Bus Conversion Magazine Bulletin Board

Bus Discussion => Bus Topics ( click here for quick start! ) => Topic started by: Moof on September 25, 2006, 07:58:35 PM



Title: Slippery Roofs
Post by: Moof on September 25, 2006, 07:58:35 PM
Several weeks ago I read the post from one of our members talking about falling off of the roof of their bus.  There was quite a bit of discussion about this.  I have been racking my brain trying to think of a good solution to this problem.   Well today I finally had an idea.  How about using Rhino Lining or a similar product to make a non-skid sidewalk to any area that may need attention?  It would be pretty expensive to do the whole roof, and unnecessary.   They even make this stuff in white.  You could mask off the desired area and lay it down.  No maintenance required.

WHACHATHINK?


Title: Re: Slippery Roofs
Post by: grantgoold on September 25, 2006, 08:03:15 PM
Cool! ;D  How about the slip preventive tape (sandpaper like) you see on stairs? It seems pretty tough and built for outdoors?

Grant


Title: Re: Slippery Roofs
Post by: Nick Badame Refrig/ACC on September 25, 2006, 08:06:48 PM
Hi Jimmy,

Is that Rhino linning non skid?    Great idea if it is...

Oh, That was Ed Skiba [ednj] that took that bouncing fall. [Ouch]

Nick-


Title: Re: Slippery Roofs
Post by: Moof on September 25, 2006, 08:14:00 PM
It is non-skid.  I've had it in my last two pick-ups.  Doesn't chip, or break apart.  There are kits you can buy to do it yourself, but I don't know what colors are available.


Title: Re: Slippery Roofs
Post by: FloridaCliff on September 25, 2006, 08:39:32 PM
Jimmy,

Great Idea!

When I was in the Coast Guard we used to add white sand to the deck paint to make it as non-skid as we needed.

But I think rhino liner or its other varietys would be sturdy enough on its own.

Cliff


Title: Re: Slippery Roofs
Post by: Jeremy on September 26, 2006, 02:00:30 AM
There are all sorts of non-slip products available for boats which would do the job very easily. The cheapest option as has been said is to add sand to gloss paint, although this tends to wear out quite quickly. Using carborumdum grit rather than sand is better, or of course proper non-slip paint. Then you have more expensive options like stick on tape and 'track mat' and the like. No need to re-invent the wheel - just pop down to your local chandlers and you see a whole variety of products available

Jeremy


Title: Re: Slippery Roofs
Post by: RJ on September 26, 2006, 07:43:15 AM

. . . just pop down to your local chandlers and you see a whole variety of products available. . .




Chandlers?  ???

A British outfit?

 :)


Title: Re: Slippery Roofs
Post by: DrivingMissLazy on September 26, 2006, 07:47:42 AM
Marine Supply?
Richard


. . . just pop down to your local chandlers and you see a whole variety of products available. . .




Chandlers?  ???

A British outfit?

 :)


Title: Re: Slippery Roofs
Post by: FloridaCliff on September 26, 2006, 07:58:38 AM
I also think I would only do maybe a 1' strip down the center of the roof.

You wouldn't be able to see it from the ground.

Also any raised surface is going to be a collect all for dirt and grime, so I would keep it to a minimum.

Cliff


Title: Re: Slippery Roofs
Post by: Len Silva on September 26, 2006, 08:14:23 AM
While at a big RV shop, I noticed that they had a steel cable at the top of each bay, strung from front to back.  The techs would wear a safety harness and strap onto the cable while working on top.

Len


Title: Re: Slippery Roofs
Post by: Jeremy on September 26, 2006, 08:57:43 AM
'Chandlery' is equipment fitted to boats, ships, yachts etc, so a chandler is a company or person that supplies such equipment. If you want a 'non-abrasive' or 'non-rough' option (to prevent the attraction of dirt), there is a product called Pro-Grip, which is basically thin sheets of neoprene. It also has the added advantage of not wearing out your clothes - not relevant to the roof of your bus, but an issue with non-slip on the decks and floor of a sailing dinghy for instance.

If you cannot find Pro-Grip by name, you should be able to get neoprene sheet from a saddlery (that's a place that supplies stuff for horses, folks). I believe they sell it for use as padding between the saddle and the horse's back; you want a sheet say 2 or 3mm thick, and stick it down to your roof with contact adhesive. It makes superb non-slip even when wet through.

Jeremy


Title: Re: Slippery Roofs
Post by: NCbob on September 26, 2006, 03:24:27 PM
My first thougt were like Cliff's (Florida Cracker).  We used to use 'sand paint' for non-skid surfaces on the large Motor Yachts..and yes
it will collect dirt, mildew, etc. and the brushes, rollers, pans are strictly in the 'throw-away' zone.

So, it's a toss-up as to your safety if you're one to get up on the roof and scrub it to be as bright as the rest of the bus or high maintanance items which might require your presence up there on a regular basis.  The only thing I'm really interested in seeing up there is a reasonably sized duplicate of my State of NC license tag numbers...just in case someone needs to find me or my stolen bus.

Me?  I've already made the determination that if it's up there and needs help...I'll call a paramedic in that field of expertise and ask him to sign a waiver for my insurance company and hope all goes well.  As for me and up there?  Color me sitting under the awning sipping a long tall cool one. ;)

NCbob