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Bus Discussion => Bus Topics ( click here for quick start! ) => Topic started by: David Anderson on December 06, 2012, 07:35:43 PM



Title: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: David Anderson on December 06, 2012, 07:35:43 PM
Getting started on my dream shop/bus garage.  Anyone interested in a project thread from beginning to end?  If so, should I post it here or bus projects forum?  I figure at my speed it will take me about 2-3 months to complete.

David


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: wg4t50 on December 06, 2012, 07:39:44 PM
I had a 40 X 60 garage built with a 14 X 14 door and a 10 X 10 door, only regret  too small, had a MCI7 at the time, filled up quick.
Good luck
Dave


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: John316 on December 06, 2012, 08:05:02 PM
David,

I would 100% follow a project thread. Please do. The project section would be the ideal spot for it.

I hope it goes well for you!

God bless,

John


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Midwilshire on December 06, 2012, 08:34:49 PM
I'd follow it with interest.  Please do.


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: sdc53 on December 06, 2012, 08:55:11 PM
I would be interested, so I vote yes.  Include materials budgets if you can..


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: buswarrior on December 06, 2012, 09:05:35 PM
Yup, do it!

happy coaching!
buswarrior


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: scanzel on December 07, 2012, 03:24:49 AM
This might be a good article for the BCM. It would give everyone getting the magazine something to see and dream about. Good way to help the magazine out with articles. We all need to contribute to BCM, otherwise it may fail.


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: crown on December 07, 2012, 05:17:58 AM
 sounds good to me we just broke ground on our bus  garage but we are off to fl. tomarow
so will get back to working on it in mid jan. mine will be simple being build useing 90 0/0
recyled matrials john


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Jeremy on December 07, 2012, 06:14:00 AM
It would be be of great interest to me if 'building' actually involves fabricating and then erecting the structure yourself - but not so much if it means buying a standard building and then paying someone to put it up for you.

I've thought quite hard about putting up a barn for my bus, but while I've done a good job on some fairly large sheds in the past, the height of a bus barn scares me a bit.

Jeremy





Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: boxcarOkie on December 07, 2012, 06:18:06 AM
It would be be of great interest to me if 'building' actually involves fabricating and then erecting the structure yourself - but not so much if it means buying a standard building and then paying someone to put it up for you.

I've thought quite hard about putting up a barn for my bus, but while I've done a good job on some fairly large sheds in the past, the height of a bus barn scares me a bit.

Jeremy

If you are going with 14' doors, then you are going to get into some "serious height" issues.  It can get intimidating when you have nothing between you and the rafters but concrete.

BCO


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: PCC on December 07, 2012, 06:51:58 AM
GO FOR IT !!!

I have a design for one for my vehicle/s, so you start yours and tell us all the things you do, then we will learn all those ideas we forgot to think about !!  LOL

With pleasure, I would love to see what you are doing, in Oregon (I presume). Winter protection will be something to consider, right?


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Jeremy on December 07, 2012, 01:39:34 PM
If you are going with 14' doors, then you are going to get into some "serious height" issues.  It can get intimidating when you have nothing between you and the rafters but concrete.

BCO

My bus is something of a baby in that 12' doors would still give me almost 6" of clearance - but that's still plenty high enough to be way outside my comfort zone as a DIY shed builder.

Jeremy


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: wg4t50 on December 07, 2012, 02:37:08 PM
One reason I used the 14' X 14' Overhead Doors (electric) and the 8" min.  4000 concrete with both fiberglass and steel, 72 yards,    after I no longer need it, someone might like to have a truck or dozer or who knows, so I felt like doing it correct the first time, I have too much experience with hind sight, trying to get ahead a little for once.
Great low bay lighting, well lite up, and all my air toys, jacks, wrenches, etc etc.
Since  the MCI is gone, feels empty with the Foretravel & not needing work.
Joy
Dave


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 07, 2012, 02:47:05 PM
David are you using a pre/fab metal or wood frame building metal is the way to go IMO I used 14x10 doors wish I would have went with 12 wide doors ,14 ft tall doors are not a problem in a 16 foot tall metal building fwiw


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: sledhead on December 07, 2012, 02:58:00 PM
Please post updates as you go                                                                                       On mine its 32' x 48' x 15' high.One 12'8"h x 12' w roll up door , a 8' h x 10' w roll up door. I put in a pit 4' x 8' x 30" deep the only down side is the cost to heat it is more then my house (don't tell my wife ) But in the end it is worth every penny to go out to work on the bus when its sub zero out side .                 dave


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: robertglines1 on December 07, 2012, 02:58:16 PM
Not OSHA correct  but I have a shallow pit that I have a cover for. Just 4 ft deep and 8 ft long . So if you need under front of bus you need to swap ends. Nice elect and air in it. Have never had a water problem as I left bottom bare with rock and then put wood planks to smooth bottom of pit.  Any spilled or runaway water just soaks in. Could pump if it had to be.  25yrs never have. Like some other we have other things that share shop that are on steel so part of shop(most of)is rock floor.  Running water so you can wash parts or bus(out of sun).  Sewer hook up stubbed out for future hook up from bus if your pouring floor. Never know when you come in with tank full and need to empty into burried tank outside building(future project). Or you need to move into bus.  RV hook up electrical box to plug coach into when in barn and one outside for visitors.   Just a few ideas.  Hope I understood your question correctly.   Bob


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Timkar on December 07, 2012, 03:09:04 PM
Just finished siding mine this past summer. 40 x 60 with 16' walls. One 14H x 12W door for the bus  and two 12'H x 10' doors (one on each end)
Finally got mezzanine done over workshop side and as usual it is full...next one may have to be bigger.... ;) ;) ;)


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: bevans6 on December 07, 2012, 04:55:27 PM
My "bus barn" is a frame building around 40' by 50' with a 14' by 12' door.  You want a decent amount of elbow room.  Pour a thick floor where you plan to actually part the bus, so it can support jacks.

Brian


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: wg4t50 on December 07, 2012, 05:25:13 PM
Luvrbus, If that was ment for Dave, my building is a metal, prefab type,  have forgotten the name of it, but it is plenty strong for our snow load etc. Love the 14 X 14 door, sometimes they are too narrow, haw..
As usual, the only mistake, should have made it 60 X 100 and certainly that would be too small too, I seem to have the ability to collect useful  junk.   ;D
And yes, would do it again, only bigger.  Still have parts for the MCI7, like block off plates for rear bags, brake foot valve-new, etc, etc...
Dave


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: chessie4905 on December 07, 2012, 05:35:59 PM
Mines 48x 60x 15 ceiling. 38 foot full depth pit, two 12x12 doors, super insulated, waste oil furnace, full bathroom with shower. Only change would be to have 13 or 14 tall doors instead. Coach roof airs only clear by about 1 inch at normal ride height.


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: David Anderson on December 07, 2012, 07:23:54 PM
Okay I'll post it in the "bus projects" section.  It won't get buried in the threads there.  This will be 100% DIY by me except the concrete pour.  I am doing the form work, however.  It will be a bolt up Mueller building 40x50x15 with a 13'T x 12'W rollup door. 

David


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: buswarrior on December 07, 2012, 08:26:23 PM
My advice would be to make the door tall enough for all legal max height vehicles.

You, or your estate, take yourselves out of a chunk of the potential market if a condo sleeper semi tractor can't get in the door.

Ask any real estate salesperson, a big garage hurts your available market, you don't want to cut it even further.

And, you never know what vehicles or roof mounted equipment you might get into in the future and curse yourself for not spending the couple of bucks now to go tall enough.

And, yes, your accumulated treasures ALWAYS expand to fill the available space.

happy coaching!
buswarrior



Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 07, 2012, 08:29:29 PM
David just remember the roof goes on last on a pre/fab metal building I had to help a friend in Quartzsite take his roof off he was looking for shade early in the process.

Rent you a small electric hyd scissor lift you can put the whole building up with one in 2 weeks by yourself BTDT


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: wg4t50 on December 08, 2012, 01:46:00 AM
The reason I used the 14' X 14' door, so later you never know what you will need to get in the door, trucks are 13'6" generally and some stuff is more than 8' wide.  Just saying
Dave


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: sledhead on December 08, 2012, 07:14:32 AM
If your winters are cold and you plan to heat it size does matter . I have r 24 in the walls r 20 under the heated floor r 50 in the ceiling . I heat with propane hi efficient boiler and if the sun were to ever shine in the winter I have 22,000 btu solar  panels ( water ) which will heat the garage . The average propane bill is about $1000.00 per year. Wow! That's like a tank and a 1/4 of bus fuel or 1600 mile trip .              dave


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 08, 2012, 07:38:03 AM
Here in AZ I installed the 14 ft doors on each end for air movement and drive through in your part of Texas you are probably going to need that air movement too David is your building going to have skylights I have 6.

Redoing the restaurants in Phoenix I found something that will move some air and a lot of it and that is the vent fans off the hoods I have a extra one if you decide to install one, the vents from the building suppliers are about useless so don't waste your money on those


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Len Silva on December 08, 2012, 08:07:41 AM
You want to give serious consideration to adding a pit to your shop.  I built a 40 x 60 shop and the pit was one of the best parts about it.  It was relatively inexpensive (about $2k as I recall).

If you do it, be sure to plumb in advance for a sump, air, and power.


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 08, 2012, 08:22:12 AM
You don't even want to go there David with the pit deal there is reason for no pits now only a shallow pit is allowed nothing over 2 foot for front end work in new construction you are a business man check the pit falls lol you will run from it

 I would say even if the locals allow a pit you would be in the $15,000 range for 4x4x8 pit to comply with the safety standards of today

good luck


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Sam 4106 on December 08, 2012, 11:55:51 AM
I love my 44" wide X 5' deep X 20' long pit. I didn't seek a permit, nor does it comply with the requirements of a commercial pit. But is very nice to have. I keep it covered with a combination of 3/8" aluminum deck plate and 3/4" plywood when the bus isn't over it so no one can fall into it. The cost was for the form plywood, rebar, and concrete. The walls are 6" thick surrounded by a 6" concrete floor with the wall rebar extending into the floor. I did all the labor myself including the digging, rebar, forming and pouring the concrete. I don't know what the requirements would be in David's area, if a permit is even required, but when I built my pit 15 years ago there were no building codes in our rural area, although I did need a building permit for the garage. Just my way. Your method may be different,

Good luck, Sam


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 08, 2012, 12:20:52 PM
Lol his bus doesn't set on the jello bags a creeper he can roll about any place he wants and besides 5 ft deep David being small in stature he would need a step ladder 

I had a pit so you guys tell me what can be done from a pit besides light duty maintenance I can tell you not much on a Eagle 


good luck


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: sledhead on December 08, 2012, 12:47:03 PM
For myself I have the jello bags and use my pit all the time ,no longer have the fear of my wife coming out to see me squashed under the bus after hours of yelling for help.    dave


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 08, 2012, 12:50:13 PM
David doesn't need to worry about the bags his Eagle won't squash him unless his wife runs over him,pits hurt the resale of property I filled one with sand and paved over it on a piece of property we sold


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: wg4t50 on December 08, 2012, 03:55:00 PM
The funny is that we are all different (crazy), me, my first requirement is a very sturdy concrete floor, then build a great bldg, 200 amp 208 Volt 3 Phase power, insulate it, have big doors and have the lift system to lift the bus, think the electric jacks like at Cummins etc, they work great, one reason for the high ceiling and the 14 X 14 doors, had the head room to get the bus up 5'.
No end to this game, even when getting too old, down size to the Foretravel, now tow the F150 Ford and haul the ATV everywhere, getting old is not so bad.
Merry Christmas
Dave M


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: belfert on December 08, 2012, 04:20:58 PM
Dave, can you actually get three phase power at your location?  I asked once about getting three phase power and the answer was a firm no.  You can get a lot of old woodworking stuff in three phase cheap.  More commercial operations going under than operations replacing equipment or expanding.


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 08, 2012, 04:31:18 PM
3 phase shouldn't be a problem but running 3 phase to a building gets real expensive I haven't gotten over the shock yet for the restaurant 15 grand to the power co and 15 grand for the panels which takes 3 weeks to ship plus the electrical contractor the stuff is pricey  


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: robertglines1 on December 08, 2012, 04:48:09 PM
My son Andy's newest building id 23 ft at peak. 16 ft side walls with 14ft tall by 18ft wide doors on side. Wish I had that at 36yrs old. But ideal is still there. Everyone has Idea shop -storage for bus.  Was just in one with finished floors so nice they were hospital quality yet still had all the function mentioned by members. It is used to maintain his bus! I envy anyone who can keep anything that clean and neat... The pit is nice but as Clifford pointed out can be done without.  As a matter of fact my present project is being built in a differant bay.   Dave as far as the 3 phase power there is a method using a donor motor to run 3 phase on a 220V outlet. I know because we are doing it! No power loss .  Andy's friend at work (fellow engineer) hooked him up with a web site that explained the wiring .  Now running a vertical  milling machine (3 phase) with donor motor wired in circuit on 220V power supply.   Bob


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Sam 4106 on December 08, 2012, 05:01:15 PM
I realize that having a large garage and pit is a liability in some areas. But, I didn't build my garage for anyone else, i built it for ME. When I am gone my wife can sell our property to any of the people on the list that have approached us wanting to buy our place. I thing our house is the main attraction but some of the guys want my garage too. So, she has the option of selling or staying here and renting the garage to her choice of people. If no one wants the pit she can hire someone to fill it. I am not worried.

Good luck, Sam


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: wg4t50 on December 08, 2012, 05:24:52 PM
There are a few ways of cheating and getting a Hi Leg on the 240 Volt from a normal single phase, using caps or using a Roto-Phase, the Capacitors work fine on small motors such a lathe, mill, band saw.
The only problem getting old, in my case by the time I can afford all the goodies and the shop, I am too old & feeble to use them, first lesson was the two post lift for the pickup or car, had to get on knees on floor to see where to place the arms & pads, then need someone to pick me
up.  Think early Rigor Mortis ?
But after a bad stroke, heart bypass work, too fat, too dumb, I feel like the lucky Puppy.  Still keep the business running strong allowing me to play.  
Life is good
Dave M


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 08, 2012, 06:02:40 PM
Bob, I keep my hanger in Scottsdale spotless the shop here is a different story it always looks like a condemned area with other people using it my daughter is the worse culprit 

Matt helped me last week it is not too bad now but that will change while I am gone for a couple of weeks you can bet on that LOL 

Wayne Schell and Bryon Pigg have the cleanest and well arranged bus shops you ever saw and those will make you droll 

I never saw but one other shop that looked better than those 2 it belonged to a friend of mine Ron he had a complete old Texaco station inside his shop with the Eagle parked under it takes a lot to keep a shop clean if you use one that is for sure


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: boxcarOkie on December 08, 2012, 06:22:29 PM
Clifford, you ever see Charlies' shop at TeJas?  I hear that Wayne's shop is something akin to a NASCAR shop, really a looker.  Jefferson in OKC is one of the worst I have ever seen and also an EPA nightmare.  Sonnies is functional and pretty well organized.  

Clean shop ... Happy Shop.  

All loose women and unclaimed children will be sold as slaves after thirty-days.

Mine is not always tidy and the thing will get to the point where it takes four hours or more to get it back into any kind of reasonable resemblance of a shop.  I hate it when it gets that way.  I wish now that I had sprung for the pit, and not listened to my Ins. Agent (what he don't know won't hurt him).

BCO


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 08, 2012, 06:32:48 PM
Don, I would not call Charlies place a shop lol mine looks bad sometimes but nothing like that and Jefferson's shop is pretty nasty since Roy died it wasn't always like that 

I haven't been there since Norris retired but the office when Norris was there smoking 3 packs a day the office was hard to handle also


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: David Anderson on December 08, 2012, 07:43:50 PM
Only bad thing about posting this in the project section is that guests cannot see it.  Oh well, it is there.  If you are a guest, register so you can follow the progress.

David


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: boxcarOkie on December 08, 2012, 07:51:35 PM
"I haven't been there since Norris retired but the office when Norris was there smoking 3 packs a day the office was hard to handle also"

"It might be best to say "the entire place" was hard to handle also" ... Norris was quite the character. 

My hat is off to anyone who builds their own shop, it is quite a process.  We are building a 30X50 not far from here, and last week had to stop because of the wind, just could not hold onto the materials.

BCO


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Geoff on December 09, 2012, 04:48:35 PM
I built my shop at my my house and did not even consider having a worthless pit I could trip and fall into.  My trump card is I am able to drive a bus or truck from one end and out the other end to a different street.  No backing up.  Plus I still have another 52' bay for all my stuff.  You guys might be dreaming about what you think is best but I already built the 2,000ft shop I wanted, and it wasn't cheap.  And I love it-- fully insulated with electric door openers. 


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: chessie4905 on December 09, 2012, 05:51:19 PM
My pit has a three inch deep by 4 inch wide  notch along edges. I keep it closed with 3x6 inch oak planks. I allowed just enough room to clear the inside of the duals to remove what is needed from below if necessary. Most servicing is at the rear but front is needed access for lubrication, etc. I usually remove necessary planks when coach is over pit.
 People need to remember that the shop is to service, store, or repair your pride and joy coach and not trying to build the Taj Mahal. Most areas need a permit to build the building. What you do inside out of sight, like a pit, floor, electric, is done after building is erected. Your area might be different, especially where you live. As far as electric, you could run that out there to a panel and one receptacle and get that approved, possibly.


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: sledhead on December 10, 2012, 05:32:20 AM
I use my pit for maintance on bus,to oil spray,change the oil,filters on our other cars and trucks.It just gives you a lot more room under the vehicles for maintance.Unlike a creeper where you are claustrophobic under a vehicle.                  dave


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: buswarrior on December 10, 2012, 07:30:49 AM
Whichever strategy a busnut follows, the easier something is to do, the more likely we will do it.

The problem with the human default capacity for energy conservation might be...

The harder it is to gain access to the slack adjusters, the less likely they will be checked as often?

A pit, though heavy with negatives, makes accessing the underside quick, easy, and relatively less physical as we age.

Used to just dive under stuff, now, there's a pause... it isn't as easy as it used to be, and now there's a 2 day recovery of strained muscles and barked skin to heal over. Don't remember it being like that before...

Of course a set of those wheel snatching hoists would be lovely, but spendy.

One variation on a pit that a busnut shared some time ago was building the pit into a drop-off, created by the end of the fill for the driveway, as I recall. Old railway ties or other landscaping techniques may be employed, as it was open at one end over the edge. Also, all the dangers of accumulated fumes/gases are gone, as they can waft away.

Nose or tail would be accommodated by turning the coach around.

Claim it is the stairs to the lower level and you are done?

happy coaching!
buswarrior







Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: wg4t50 on December 10, 2012, 09:14:53 AM
BW,
My first setup consisted of two welded ramps, 22"wide X 10" high with a ramp of 3.5' and the top was 15" length.  Used that setup for everything except when did the rear end, used a pit at a charter bus operator garage, they run about 25 MCI bus's and on a Saturday I had access to the pit and forklift for lifting out of the pit along with a wheeled hydraulic jack in the pit to bolt the 3rd member to, so in the end was a rather simple deal on the rear, new bearings, and gears, shaft, thrust washers and pinion seal, kept the origional ring & pinion, all else was new.  Never had any issue after that, very quiet and smooth.  Used the ramps for front end, rear work, greasing brake adjustment, etc..
Yes, as we age, things take a bit longer to address for sure, now why I use an employee, I'm just too old, feeble and fat I guess.
Dave M


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 10, 2012, 09:38:12 AM
It's a done deal anyway the town David lives in required a engineered set of plans sign by as registered civil or structural engineer as most do for the permit and he made no mention of a pit 

If you have access a drive through building is the only way to go this is the first one for me and like Geoff I love it


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Bob Gilbert on December 10, 2012, 12:52:46 PM
http://i573.photobucket.com/albums/ss179/oscarcurleypriss/101-1.jpg (http://i573.photobucket.com/albums/ss179/oscarcurleypriss/101-1.jpg)

trying to post a pic for the first time


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Bob Gilbert on December 10, 2012, 12:57:32 PM
Well Ill be, it worked.
This is my new bus barn and future home. It is 50x50 with a 50x18 living area across the front. Yes it has cracks, built on Okla clay lol


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Busnut83 on December 10, 2012, 01:34:34 PM
Good Idea???  I am about to start building???? Need ideas


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 10, 2012, 01:58:01 PM
Looking good Bob red clay on rock what else could be better tell Sandy hi for us and give me a call if you guys come through Phoenix I know a place where we can eat free (so to speak) lol

good luck


Title: Re: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Dave5Cs on December 10, 2012, 02:28:29 PM
Costco

Dave5Cs from Galaxy S III


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: David Anderson on December 10, 2012, 05:18:46 PM
Well Ill be, it worked.
This is my new bus barn and future home. It is 50x50 with a 50x18 living area across the front. Yes it has cracks, built on Okla clay lol
Very nice Bob,  I saw a lot of buildings with the wainscot walls of different color in Missouri.  It's very popular there.  Don't see it much in Texas, but I think it looks great.  My building will be so hidden from the street when done, I decided not to do mine that way.  It saves me a few $$.

I thought about doing a wood frame building like yours, but I was getting so much grief from the city about engineering, I gave up and said, "Mueller".  Their blood pressure then dropped to normal.  

Did you use regular flanged type windows that can be bought and any orange box store?  I'm leaning that way because they are 1/2 the price of steel building windows.  As long as I get the drip trims installed correctly it looks like regular windows will work fine.  The trim reveal on your windows looks extra large and doesn't look like a regular J trim piece around each window.

David


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: junkman42 on December 11, 2012, 04:10:22 AM
David, I have a Morton built building with the wainscot.  The biggest advantage besides looks is when Your wife trys to drive through the wall with a kubota RTV.  Should I mention what pallet forks on a tractor does to the overall appearance.  The wainscot makes repair easy.  Morton is used to My begging for factory panels LOL!  Just My take on things.  John L


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 11, 2012, 05:23:08 AM
Any self flashing window will work on a steel building David and any good window shop can order those for you, the framing for metal buildings (headers) get expensive did your kit come with those and don't forget to pre treat the concrete slab for termites those little guys work wonders in concrete lol


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Ed Hackenbruch on December 11, 2012, 05:46:01 AM
My brother bought a place that has a steel quonset (sp?) hut type of shop. Must be about 45ft long as we had a couple of feet of room in front of my 5A and enough room behind it to work on it when we fixed my broken radius arm pin a year or two ago.  No roof rafters to contend with and less wasted space to heat......although since it is in Yuma heating is not really much of an issue! ;D


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Bob Gilbert on December 11, 2012, 07:28:10 AM
David, my building was built by Amish from around Chouteau, Okla. it was a turn key including windows doors slab etc. I  did the electrical and built the living quarters. The windows also were built in that area by Amish, vinyl tilt in and insulated.

Clifford, we are planning on wintering around Brownsville this year but if we change are minds I will call you.

Bob


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 11, 2012, 07:49:42 AM
Bob, did Miller build your building ?


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Bob Gilbert on December 11, 2012, 08:07:39 AM
No Clifford, Ed Yoder.


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: luvrbus on December 11, 2012, 08:15:24 AM
Amazing the work Miller and Yoder can do but both sneak a little of the modern day technology and tools into the program did he drive his tractor to work or hire a van lol 

I watched those guys build a barn for Frank Robinson (RCB Bank owner) using wood pegs on the trusses per Frank amazing what they can do with so much pride in workman ship that barn looked like a piece of furniture


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: David Anderson on December 11, 2012, 05:13:24 PM
I agree, those folks do great work.  That wainscot feature is their popular style.  All those metal buildings I saw in Missouri were Amish built, most likely.  They really look good and go up so fast.

David


Title: Re: Building a bus garage/shop
Post by: Bob Gilbert on December 12, 2012, 07:37:18 AM
(http://i573.photobucket.com/albums/ss179/oscarcurleypriss/081-1.jpg)

Clifford, Ed jumped the fence, he drives a pick up and uses power tools. One of his helpers is a active Amish and drives a tractor to work.