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October 19, 2017, 06:49:40 PM *
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 1 
 on: Today at 06:26:49 PM 
Started by lvmci - Last post by DoubleEagle
Back when I was young and dangerous (21) I got a "SMOKIN'" deal on a '69 Stingray 427 4 speed basket case.
I quickly built the 427 with upgraded goodies like an edelbrock aluminum manifold, huge holley double pumper carb, huge lananti roller cam, jackson gear drive, and a host of other go fast goodies. Put a ceramic clutch in it and some sticky mickey (thompson) tires all the way around and took it for it's first drive since it was completely stripped 10 yrs earlier!
2 days later it was up for sale when I discover the lowest legal insurance required by law was going to cost ME double what I had invested in the car!
I traded it for a 1948 Harley pan head with suicide clutch & shifter. Which I rode a year before taking what I thought to be a crazy high offer on it. (wish I knew then what I know now, on both the vette and the hog!)
Grin  BK  Grin

This whole thread is one big drift in time, but it gives a few of us a warm fuzzy feeling. Speaking of Corvettes, I passed up buying a 1963 split window coupe for $2300, and a 1967 435 hp 427 with a close-ratio 4 speed for $2900 to buy a 1968 convertible with a 350 hp 327 for $3600. The first two are now worth more than that 1968. Back then, some people took out the split window to put in a one-piece to make it look newer. Yes indeed, because of the crazy street racing going on with all the super-cars of that time, only the affluent could afford the insurance.  Cry

 2 
 on: Today at 06:23:37 PM 
Started by richard5933 - Last post by richard5933
What about replacing the cast iron nipple sticking out the bottom with something like this? I can then install the appropriate coupler to the hose  to make it flow.

Richard

 3 
 on: Today at 06:20:27 PM 
Started by richard5933 - Last post by eagle19952
i'm not sure i'd sacrifice that much ground clearance for a poop pipe.  Huh

 4 
 on: Today at 06:13:44 PM 
Started by richard5933 - Last post by richard5933
First, the neutral and ground should be bonded at the source. i.e. when connected to shore power, it is bonded in the house panel and should not be bonded in the bus. When the generator is producing power, it should be bonded at the generator, which is appears to be based on your description. When an inverter is producing power, it should be bonded at the inverter. There are a few ways to accomplish this. One is a transfer switch. Another is separate sockets which you manually switch a pigtail between, depending on what source you desire to use. 

Second, If your bus is wired for 50 amp service to shore line, just buy a dogbone connector for 30 amp service. This connection has the two hot wires tied together internally, so when you plug into 30 amp post, it will power both sides of the breaker box on the one hot leg coming from the power post. If your bus is only wired for 30 amp shore power, then consider the individual sockets I alluded to above and to the crossover inside the shore power plug.


I understand what you're saying that only the source should be bonded, whether it be the generator, the shore power, or the inverter. Unfortunately they didn't know that at Custom Coach in 1974. Actually, I have heard that in some areas of the country things used to be done differently with regard to bonding neutral/ground. The 120v panel on the bus has bonded neutral/ground. It would need to be totally redone to change that, as the wiring hasn't got a spare inch to move any thing to separate things out.

It appears that the bus is wired for 50-amp service. However, this was accomplished through the use of a 3-conductor receptacle - I'm guessing because that's all they had in 1974 to work with. The 3-conductor is wired L1, L2, bonded neutral/ground. I know that's not what it should be, but it is. Apparently they've used it for 43 years this way.

I checked with the electrician that helped me re-do our first coach to bring it into this century. He said that while not ideal, continuing to run as is will work for the short term. All I need to do is re-create the original adapter spec'd out in the wiring diagram so that I can plug the bus into a modern 50-amp outlet. Eventually we'll figure out how to break out the ground/neutral and run a proper 50-amp setup throughout the bus.

There are so many oddities of the electrical system on this coach that I want to run as is if possible just to see what is powered by what. For example, there is really no house battery setup. There is a 12v 8D battery on the generator. It's not deep cycle, but it is used to run the 12v systems on the bus. I think that they planned to be on generator or shore power nearly all the time. There are also a lot of house systems running on the chassis 24v battery bank. Also not deep cycle. These are mainly lights but also include the water pump and some of the solenoids for the pneumatic controls for things like the stair well cover.

Once I fully understand how things are currently running I'll start drawing up plans to break it down and create it with a proper house battery bank.

Any insights would be welcome.

 5 
 on: Today at 05:56:19 PM 
Started by lvmci - Last post by lvmci
No problem, just meant to reminisce about the old beauties that roamed the southwest and my home town when I was a kid, lvmci...

 6 
 on: Today at 05:55:06 PM 
Started by richard5933 - Last post by kyle4501
I would look for a pvc thread to socket weld adapter. Screw it on to the pipe & glue a piece of pvc pipe in to it & then glue on the hose adapter. 

 7 
 on: Today at 05:46:14 PM 
Started by VelvetLounger - Last post by kyle4501
            On the other hand, OP said "temporary" so yah gotta make the call, how much do you want to limit yourself to make it temporary and cheap versus permanent and good.

One advantage of putting the wire in conduit is that it is easier to reuse it later in another circuit. So, while it may be overkill for 'temporary' -- later he will have a head start when he installs 'permanent'.  Grin

 8 
 on: Today at 05:16:10 PM 
Started by richard5933 - Last post by richard5933
I like the brass valve setup. If it works, I would just figure out a way to put a standard valve and hookup after it and use it for holding back the blackwater, (the water with the chunks in it  Cool). That way when you're parked for a while you can leave the grey valve open and just dump your blackwater every few days and not risk building a pyramid of doom in the tank.
Will
That's my plan... I just need to figure out how to add a modern connection to the cast iron. Not much room underneath, and I'm afraid of doing anything that lowers it more.

No gray tank on the bus. Just fresh and black. Both probably 100 gallons or more. With the smaller outlet on the black tank, being combined is probably a good thing. Otherwise, it wouldn't have enough liquid to push everything through to opening.

Is there a 'standard' method of connecting a modern sewer hose fitting to the cast iron?

1974 GMC P8M4108A-125 (Current bus)
1964 GM PD4106-2412 (totalled Sept 2017)
Located in beautiful Wisconsin
KD9GRB

 9 
 on: Today at 04:34:30 PM 
Started by rwc - Last post by Jeremy
I did mine singlehanded and used lengths of threaded rod (one on each structural beam) rather than jacks to wind the roof up to the new level. Because the roof was always held captive by those threaded rods there was never really a point at which the roof was fully detached from the rest of the bus which meant that there was no need to rush things and no need to get stressed about the things that could go wrong when the roof was balanced in the air and not attached to anything

The sides of my bus are curved rather than being flat and vertical, but that wasn't really a problem because I put the raise above the windows and covered the gap with curved panels moulded out of fibreglass which effectively extended the roof skin down to the windows. The end result looks 'factory' I would say.

Making those side panels, and also the new fibreglass front and rear caps, were genuinely the only aspects of the job which took any skill or specialist knowledge I think - everything else was just very basic cutting and welding, just quite a lot of it

Jeremy

 10 
 on: Today at 03:42:37 PM 
Started by richard5933 - Last post by PP
I like the brass valve setup. If it works, I would just figure out a way to put a standard valve and hookup after it and use it for holding back the blackwater, (the water with the chunks in it  Cool). That way when you're parked for a while you can leave the grey valve open and just dump your blackwater every few days and not risk building a pyramid of doom in the tank.
Will

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