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 11 
 on: Today at 01:03:08 PM 
Started by bigred - Last post by bevans6
Bruce, your idea is exactly the same as mine!  I actually have such a charger, glued to the roof of my truck camper.  It has a little regulator box that controls the charge.  I'm sure the new ones would have a similar option.

 12 
 on: Today at 12:49:47 PM 
Started by bigred - Last post by Oonrahnjay
Warning Warning - Contrarian answer coming!  Ah-ooogha Aooogha   Grin

I was thinking about this the other day, and came up with this answer for a buddy.  It assumes all you want to do is trickle charge the batteries at a maintenance level - keep ahead of their natural tendency to discharge for a period of time.  Your batteries are connected in series for 24 volts, chassis ground up to plus 24 volt terminal.  If you get two of those panels, you can connect them in series as well, and charge both batteries at the same time.  Connect the negative of one panel output to negative of the battery pair, positive to the center connection between the two batteries, negative of the second panel to the same place, the center connection between the two batteries and the positive of the second panel to the plus 24 volt terminal.  Best to throw the disconnect switch to disconnect the batteries from the bus to eliminate phantom loads.  If your panels can supply rated up to 20 - 40 watts, they will be able to keep the batteries topped off if the batteries are good and charged to start with. 

      My thought was simpler (not saying it's any good).  Assuming that it's for trickle storage, as Brian outlines, turn off your isolator switch so that the batteries are not connecting to anything and under no load.  Get two 40 watt solar panel charger and attach one to the pos pole of one battery and its other connection to the neg pole of the same battery; do the same thing with the other one so that you're supplying a separate charge to each battery (I am pretty sure that it doesn't matter if you leave the jumper between the two connected for this). 
      That should work, but I have one question -- how good is the voltage regulation on these solar battery chargers?  If you start with something like a Group 31, fully charged and in good condition, and put a charger (any charger) on it that gives an excessive voltage -- even at fairy low wattages -- that battery will begin to get overcharged and overheated after a couple of days.  After that, you're just running a slow but definite damage to the battery and over time you'll find that you've cooked it.  And you SURE that these solar things are good quality and provide the proper voltage regulation?

 13 
 on: Today at 12:44:44 PM 
Started by luvrbus - Last post by thomasinnv
Hey cliff is that a common issue for the 11.1?

 14 
 on: Today at 12:41:34 PM 
Started by biff - Last post by Iceni John
Just bear in mind that you cannot check the Specific Gravity of any type of sealed battery such as AGM or gelcell.   With good ol' flooded lead-acid batteries you can easily check their SG every month, and top up with more water if needed  -  this can greatly prolong their life.

If your space constraints require AGMs they're your only option, but if you have space to access FLA batteries they will be the lowest cost per watt per year.

John

 15 
 on: Today at 12:35:56 PM 
Started by rkillmon - Last post by edvanland
What is the MCI phone number I need some 4 inch red reflectors
Thanks

 16 
 on: Today at 12:14:16 PM 
Started by jjb - Last post by bevans6
If I was to suss out that diagram, I would say fuel comes out of the filter and into the rails on the head via thingies 19 and 4, and the return comes out of each head and is tied together at thing 13, so thing 14 is a real good bet.  I take it the engine still isn't running well?

Brian

 17 
 on: Today at 11:41:53 AM 
Started by bigred - Last post by bevans6
Warning Warning - Contrarian answer coming!  Ah-ooogha Aooogha   Grin

I was thinking about this the other day, and came up with this answer for a buddy.  It assumes all you want to do is trickle charge the batteries at a maintenance level - keep ahead of their natural tendency to discharge for a period of time.  Your batteries are connected in series for 24 volts, chassis ground up to plus 24 volt terminal.  If you get two of those panels, you can connect them in series as well, and charge both batteries at the same time.  Connect the negative of one panel output to negative of the battery pair, positive to the center connection between the two batteries, negative of the second panel to the same place, the center connection between the two batteries and the positive of the second panel to the plus 24 volt terminal.  Best to throw the disconnect switch to disconnect the batteries from the bus to eliminate phantom loads.  If your panels can supply rated up to 20 - 40 watts, they will be able to keep the batteries topped off if the batteries are good and charged to start with.

 18 
 on: Today at 11:15:59 AM 
Started by bigred - Last post by Iceni John
To effectively charge a 24V battery requires up to 29.4V during the Absorb stage, so at the minimum you'll need big grid-tie panels that typically produce just over 30V each.   However, this still may not be enough due to cable losses and charge controller inefficiences, unless you have pairs of GT panels to provide about 60V to the CC.   MPPT charge controllers work best when the panel voltage is no more than twice the battery voltage, but cheaper CC's will just chop off the unneeded voltage.   Flooded lead-acid batteries should be charged at between 5 and 13% of their 20-hour rate  -  this will determine how many and what size panels, and how many amps output of the CC.

John   

 19 
 on: Today at 10:44:27 AM 
Started by luvrbus - Last post by luvrbus
They are 11.1 L I am sure the counter bores are bad,the cranks don't go bad unless you run one dry.I just priced out a rebuild on a 12.7 using all DD parts over 18 grand in parts alone to do it right   

 20 
 on: Today at 10:24:41 AM 
Started by luvrbus - Last post by Dave5Cs
Cliffords are the blocks cracked or broken cranks or is it just the cost itself of rebuilding as a whole?
Dave

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