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 41 
 on: June 24, 2017, 10:33:20 PM 
Started by Archer - Last post by Archer
Bob-

Thank you. Just now (Sat Night) getting back to the bulletin board, flying out Sunday night. The local Detroit Diesel house got me an oil cartridge and a fuel cartridge, they are in the car and not handy for numbers. He was of the opinion that primary and secondary fuel filters were only available in spin on style.

Offhand, what would the cooling system capacity be, so I can get sufficient antifreeze?

Thanks again,


Tony

 42 
 on: June 24, 2017, 10:01:39 PM 
Started by edvanland - Last post by Dave5Cs
Don emailed me today and was telling me that guy is very good to work with on the trailer-toad. There are two versions. One is more heavy duty than the other which is the one he got and he mentioned he had them modify it the way he wanted it.And he said yes you just insert a pin to back up and it backs up very easily. Travels like a dream. About $5,000.00 was the price after the mods he made to it.

Here a picture Don sent me of Clifford trying to steal it when he wasn't looking....... Shocked Grin

 43 
 on: June 24, 2017, 09:48:28 PM 
Started by Dreadnought - Last post by Dave5Cs
Awesome. The top one must be the BLUE LIGHT SPECIAL..........
Very creative....... Grin

 44 
 on: June 24, 2017, 08:38:22 PM 
Started by Dreadnought - Last post by luvrbus
Very interesting, thank you for those insights.



You mention the difficulty of producing liners with different port windows.   Didn't Don Fairchild do this with his CCTS-modified 2-stroke Detroits that could achieve later emissions standards?

John


Yes Don did do that,you can buy different port size liners aftermarket or from Detroit the   
95 and 105 are the 2 most popular now

 45 
 on: June 24, 2017, 08:09:52 PM 
Started by Dreadnought - Last post by Dreadnought
I just watched Space Balls again with friends. Got bored of doing engineering type of stuff and have always been a bit of a sci Fi buff. I thought what a great parody space craft Capt Lonestars Eagle 5 is in Space Balls. I wondered what a similar comedy parody of a 60s MC5 would look like. I wanted to keep it looking somehow period so used bits off contemporary mythical space craft:







Ok, I'll start taking my pills again Cheesy

 46 
 on: June 24, 2017, 07:54:55 PM 
Started by Zephod - Last post by DoubleEagle
I would recommend that you look for a welding course for beginners at a local vocational school or community college so that you can get on the spot guidance. One of your problems, beyond the wrong rod for the situation, is your vision of the welding puddle, and the steadiness of the arc length. Good welding helmets with auto-darkening and adjustable levels of darkness would help you see what is going on better. They are expensive, but very useful. The welding unit you have might only be AC with a short duty cycle like 10-20%, units that have AC and DC + or - with longer duty cycles can keep you going over long welds. Again, that costs money as well, but good used units can be found. I am still using a Lincoln Idealarc 250 that I bought used in 1984 at an auction.

 47 
 on: June 24, 2017, 07:18:12 PM 
Started by Dreadnought - Last post by Dreadnought
Very interesting, thank you for those insights.

I often wonder how much improvement a 6V92 would derive from an air-air CAC instead of that air-water aftercooler that probably heats up the coolant more than it helps the engine's intake air temperatures.   I think a lot of our perennial cooling problems are directly related to that aftercooler.

During your research did you have any chance to compare the venerable Commer TS2 with Detroit's 2-strokes?   Is the TS2's opposed-piston design advantageous to a non-OP 2-stroke?   (How does the Deltic also compare?)   TS2s used to get quite a lot of power from a relatively small displacement, but I suspect they weren't torquey.

You mention the difficulty of producing liners with different port windows.   Didn't Don Fairchild do this with his CCTS-modified 2-stroke Detroits that could achieve later emissions standards?

John

I mentioned the difficulty of producing a liner- yes, as I'm a single independent guy- trying to save my money! At Achates with opposed piston engines- we made them all the time, but I'd build a one off. Believe me, I'm not going into some sort of business trying to pedal this. I don't see a viable market.

We bought a Tillings Steven engine from New Zealand (the commers seem to have a following down there) but on the first run one of the huge rocker arms broke and we never got any useful data out of it. :-(

What I have found with opposed piston engines is the following:

The- the OP layout allows for a long stroke which has advantages in terms of scavenging and thermal efficiency but this is pretty much lost due to the friction from the extra piston- also figure that the piston skirt grows ALOT with increased stroke to maintain the port timing.

We found that less heat was rejected to the coolant and more went to the exhaust system. As I extrapolated or hypothesised above- I reckon our Detroit diesel style would possibly reject more heat to coolant- as it has a water jacket around 4 exhaust valves...

 48 
 on: June 24, 2017, 07:11:51 PM 
Started by Dreadnought - Last post by Dreadnought
Dread -

I went with Scott Robertson on Thursday to help him pick up an MC-6 with the original 12V71 engine in it.

Unlike the 5s, 7s, 8s, 9s, etc., the 6 uses a HUGE, hydraulically-driven, radiator on the LH side, like GM, Prevost & Eagle and now current MCIs.

Only reason I mention this is that the 12V71 hp & torque figures aren't that different from an 8V92TA, so you might be able to come up with some rough heat load numbers that could help with your extrapolations.

You might have to look outside the normal transportation numbers for the 12V, possibly marine or industrial applications, to find what you're looking for.

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink

PS:  I drove the 6 for about a mile - that 12V has got TONS of torque!  I remember reading somewhere that with 60 injectors, it produces 1350 ftlbs of torque at 1200 rpm!  Insane (for it's day, of course!)  Fun, none the less!   Grin

That's insane and amazing! I love the idea of the 12 cylinder however I must keep sane and I know the Turbo has benefits at high altitude!

Does the MC6 with 12v71 have just ONE radiator on the Left hand side or in this radiator in addition to the two that are there on the MC5s?

I just talked to my friend whos still at the Opposed piston 2 stroke company and we tried to figure out,qualitively if not quantitively, if the Detroit 2 stroke would be worse in terms of heat rejection than a series 60 4 stroke, or a Cummins 4 stroke, then where it stood relative to an opposed piston 2 stroke etc.

We decided that the fact that it has 4 exhaust valves and a coolant jacket around that made it worse than a 2 stroke opposed piston (this rejects less heat to coolant and more to the exhaust gases themselves) and likely worse than a the 4 strokes.

 49 
 on: June 24, 2017, 07:11:07 PM 
Started by Dreadnought - Last post by Iceni John
Very interesting, thank you for those insights.

I often wonder how much improvement a 6V92 would derive from an air-air CAC instead of that air-water aftercooler that probably heats up the coolant more than it helps the engine's intake air temperatures.   I think a lot of our perennial cooling problems are directly related to that aftercooler.

During your research did you have any chance to compare the venerable Commer TS2 with Detroit's 2-strokes?   Is the TS2's opposed-piston design advantageous to a non-OP 2-stroke?   (How does the Deltic also compare?)   TS2s used to get quite a lot of power from a relatively small displacement, but I suspect they weren't torquey.

You mention the difficulty of producing liners with different port windows.   Didn't Don Fairchild do this with his CCTS-modified 2-stroke Detroits that could achieve later emissions standards?

John

 50 
 on: June 24, 2017, 07:08:46 PM 
Started by Zephod - Last post by oltrunt
I hate it when that happens.  If this particular weld is cosmetic and not structural--say like a hatch frame, it'll probably be OK.  If there is ANY load on the weld grind it all out and do it again after a little practice with the puddle.  I also noticed your weld line isn't always following the seam but skipping around a bit.  Back grinding the edges to be butt welded goes better if you grind back the edges 45 degrees to the mid thickness of the material--both sides if possible.  As best I can tell, either stick or mig will get the job done equally well given knowledge of both the material and the rod (wire) you are working with.
Jack

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