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 41 
 on: October 20, 2017, 06:06:26 PM 
Started by rwc - Last post by Dave5Cs
That would work also but at no time with the Older type bumper jacks is the roof and or side detached from each other. They are actually incorporated by welds and or large clamps and pieces of steel that are also welded to them. Then it is simply and evenly jack up. You add the new pieces that will be welded in and reinforced and then the jacks are cut loose. Gary Bennett of B&B Coach in LV was the first to have done them many years ago.

 42 
 on: October 20, 2017, 05:44:32 PM 
Started by eagle19952 - Last post by Geoff
If Richard with his 1974 Custom Coach if having problems figuring out the wiring, I would hate to see someone figure out anything on that bus.  My RTS is a 2002 conversion, but I made everything simple to figure out.  I wouldn't trade even for that whorehouse.

 43 
 on: October 20, 2017, 05:42:52 PM 
Started by richard5933 - Last post by richard5933
In looking over the wiring diagram again, I see mention of 'grounding clip'.

Did they used to run the fourth (ground) wire from bus chassis to pedestal ground this way? I'm going to crack open one of the ends of the original shore cord tomorrow and see what's inside. Maybe there is a fourth conductor?

 44 
 on: October 20, 2017, 05:32:56 PM 
Started by Nel - Last post by dtcerrato
Forgot to mention that when the valves in the engine house are open the defroster is circulated hot coolant temp weather the larger under floor radiator core valve for the main heater blowers is open or not...

 45 
 on: October 20, 2017, 05:29:23 PM 
Started by Nel - Last post by dtcerrato
Nel here's a photo taken back in the early 80s of the 4104 defroster. We abandoned the original valve & updated it to a later brass ball valve & extended the handle so the driver could access it easily. The little air bleed screw is in the upper left hand corner of the core as pictured just above the upper line going into the core. Down under the bus extreme front toward passenger side are two 3/8 copper lines that drain the core, one is wet drain the other lets air in so water flows to drain, the small valves are accessible inside the bus under the defroster unit in an empty space there, that would be for draining where the above mentioned air bleeder would be for when filling the system. If you haven't used the defroster core, you will love it when cold. On high it will raise the temp in the drivers area & beyond. There is a lever at the right knee when sitting that mixes the air to circulate (move just inside air) or ventilate (bring in outside air). Also a diverter flap forward & lower than that lever that diverts air up (to windshield) or down (to feet/floor) or anywhere in between. Our whole system was removed & restored as most of its functions were froze from rust or dirt.

 46 
 on: October 20, 2017, 05:07:03 PM 
Started by richard5933 - Last post by richard5933
I picked up a glue-on bayonet fitting today. It's designed to go on 3" pipe. Also bought a reducing bushing and some appropriated sized PVC fittings, all in the hopes of replacing the downward-facing 2" cast iron nipple with the PVC & bayonet fitting. If all goes well, then it shouldn't hang down any lower than current setup. It seems that since I'm using PVC/ABS for the bottom portion, worst case scenario it becomes the weak link and snaps off if it hits something. It seems better to have the break below the floor in the plastic pieces rather than the cast iron parts above. The actual dump valve is so far inboard that I'm not worried about it.

I'll post photos once it's together.

Richard

 47 
 on: October 20, 2017, 04:28:52 PM 
Started by richard5933 - Last post by richard5933
Also check if there is continuity between the skin (ground) and the neutral leg. You should be able to do that without plugging it in at all.
If the bus has a bonded neutral/ground, then won't there always be continuity between them?

Isn't it current between hot and bus skin (neutral/ground ) that I'm worried about?

Richard
1974 GMC P8M4108A-125 (Current bus)
1964 GM PD4106-2412 (totalled Sept 2017)
Located in beautiful Wisconsin
KD9GRB

 48 
 on: October 20, 2017, 03:59:42 PM 
Started by richard5933 - Last post by j.m.jackson
Also check if there is continuity between the skin (ground) and the neutral leg. You should be able to do that without plugging it in at all.

 49 
 on: October 20, 2017, 03:56:13 PM 
Started by richard5933 - Last post by Dave5Cs
Especially when wet or if raining and say you touch the skin and are standing in a puddle. People have actually died this way.
Please test the skin. If you have a Multimeter. Plug the shore cord into the bus first and then with no one on board or around the bus but you plug the house side in.
Use the + prob and touch the metal skin of the bus and put the other prob into the neutral of a cord plugged into a grounded outlet. If there is a hot-skin condition you will see a current reading on your meter. if it is a GFCI outlet it should pop the breaker. HTH

 50 
 on: October 20, 2017, 03:42:37 PM 
Started by Oonrahnjay - Last post by richard5933
I've been using the Tapatalk app on Android to post photos. Automatically resizes them on upload.

Richard
1974 GMC P8M4108A-125 (Current bus)
1964 GM PD4106-2412 (totalled Sept 2017)
Located in beautiful Wisconsin
KD9GRB

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