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 61 
 on: February 26, 2015, 02:52:37 PM 
Started by Bryan - Last post by Bryan
I found out today that one of my batteries was completely dead, ended up replacing both of them, I'm feeling charged and powerful at the moment :-)

 62 
 on: February 26, 2015, 02:51:11 PM 
Started by Bryan - Last post by Bryan
I had a similar situation in Boston, 1974, during Christmas week. I had a really fun 1966 Dodge Town Wagon that I had changed the original 318 cubic inch engine out to a 392 cubic inch Hemi. That week the outdoor temperature did not get above -5 degrees. I went out to start the Wagon and it started, but like you, the starter disengaged but kept spinning. I had to remove the battery cable to get it to stop. Yes, the problem was the starter solenoid. I was able to get one locally and did the replacement laying on the concrete floor in my brother-in-laws unheated garage. Never experienced another problem with the starter or solenoid after the fix. I'll never forget the feeling of freezing fingers working on metal bolts at -5 degrees!
My vote goes to your having to replace the starter solenoid.
Good luck on getting yours repaired.

Wow! That is COLD!!! Glad you got it fixed though!

 63 
 on: February 26, 2015, 02:35:00 PM 
Started by Bryan - Last post by expressbus
I had a similar situation in Boston, 1974, during Christmas week. I had a really fun 1966 Dodge Town Wagon that I had changed the original 318 cubic inch engine out to a 392 cubic inch Hemi. That week the outdoor temperature did not get above -5 degrees. I went out to start the Wagon and it started, but like you, the starter disengaged but kept spinning. I had to remove the battery cable to get it to stop. Yes, the problem was the starter solenoid. I was able to get one locally and did the replacement laying on the concrete floor in my brother-in-laws unheated garage. Never experienced another problem with the starter or solenoid after the fix. I'll never forget the feeling of freezing fingers working on metal bolts at -5 degrees!
My vote goes to your having to replace the starter solenoid.
Good luck on getting yours repaired.

 64 
 on: February 26, 2015, 01:49:42 PM 
Started by Tikvah - Last post by PP
If they were my batteries, I'd check the voltage on each with a voltmeter and make sure you haven't dropped a cell. Then I would check the gravity in each cell and find out what's going on. They boiled out because your charger had a brain fart and cooked them. I had a 'smart' charger do that to me a few years back. I took the charger out of my system and fixed it with clamps and use it as a loaner when someone needs a quick charge on their car or something. I have a hard time parting with things, just ask my DW.
BTW-you can pick up a specific gravity tester for a couple three bucks in most stores that deal with autoparts or batteries. Very handy device if you ever want to know whether to swap out a battery or try to save it.
Will

 65 
 on: February 26, 2015, 01:06:05 PM 
Started by siberyd - Last post by siberyd
Tom,

Sometimes people will share the price they pay in their bus transactions. I have seen buses go for unique amounts. Anything fromun free to 25k. I will inquire how much the bus went for and see if I get a response. I do know that there were atleast 2 different people that wanted that coach. The non-winner went and bought a seated coach that will be painted in Greyhound colors. Seems the movie Shawshank Redemption was filmed in his town. He already bought the Ford bus from the opening credits.

 I filled the University's email box with enough bus stuff to help them with any endeavor.

National Bus Trader Magazine has a price list in the back every quarter. It gives the going price for seated coaches including 4104's.

Siberyd

 66 
 on: February 26, 2015, 11:58:15 AM 
Started by siberyd - Last post by pd4501-771
Hey Jon

Do you ever get sale price info on these transactions? As a seated 04 owner I would love to know what that bus sold for. I keep close tabs on all 4501 prices, as people often ask what things are worth. In my opinion, recent sale prices are at least somewhere to start with for a value. Or maybe I'll cry, as I missed a smoking deal! Feel free to PM me if you prefer not to discuss on line. Take care

Tom


 67 
 on: February 26, 2015, 09:22:58 AM 
Started by Tikvah - Last post by eagle19952
I believe what Brian said, one or more batteries has a bad cell or are aged out.
A good battery will not boil out that quickly, in my experience.
as long as the plates are covered there is enough water.
Do you use distilled or tap water ?
Wre they my batteries I would do an equalization charge and then a heavy load test.

 68 
 on: February 26, 2015, 09:09:10 AM 
Started by Tikvah - Last post by bevans6
You may have one failed or failing cell in a battery.  The smart charger shifts into trickle charge/maintenance mode when it senses the voltage of the battery is up to a certain level and current flow has tailed off to near zero.  If a battery has a bad cell it might never get to that point, and the smart charger might not switch to it's maintenance level point.

Brian

 69 
 on: February 26, 2015, 08:56:37 AM 
Started by Tikvah - Last post by Tikvah
Quote
When was the last time you checked water levels?

I made sure they were full, and clean the terminals at the end of summer when we left our park in Michigan.  Put on some miles since then but just normal stuff.
I have a small smart charger... but I've had that awhile.

Dave

 70 
 on: February 26, 2015, 08:52:13 AM 
Started by Tikvah - Last post by Oonrahnjay
I opened my battery door the other day and my engine start batteries were gurgling.  Also, the top of them were a bit wet. 
I haven't been driving for awhile, just parked and maintained on a battery charger.
I haven't seen that before, so I killed the disconnect switch and unplugged the battery charger and left it there a few days.
Tomorrow we start driving again, so today I opened the door again, unhooked and pulled the batteries and they were low on water.  I poured about 1-1/2 gallon into the two batteries.

So, did they boil because they were low on water?
Or, did are the low on water because they boiled?

Dave

     Hard to know without measuring voltages, etc. but it sounds to me like your charger has been overcharging them.  You need a higher voltage to get through the resistance of the battery when charging but when the battery is at (or very nearly at) full capacity, the charger should drop back to a lower "float" charge (assuming that you have a "smartcharger".   And batteries will react differently to charging depending on whether they're fresh and working well or older and showing signs of aging.
     On the other hand, wet-cell batteries lose a little water over time with normal charging.  When was the last time you checked water levels?
     All just WAIG'n, but that charge system is the first thing I'd look at.

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