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September 30, 2016, 10:19:33 AM *
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 71 
 on: September 29, 2016, 07:31:00 AM 
Started by belfert - Last post by luvrbus
If you use too much pressure or hold the air nozzle too close to the filter, yes, but applying an air flow that is more gentle from a distance will not be much different than the air flow coming in when the engine is running. The big air filter elements are priced just a bit above my level of cheapness, but then, I am pretty frugal.  Roll Eyes


Cat has always allowed you to blow a filter out they even sold a fan type air nozzle to use.I even bought 1 of the washers they sold to clean the filter you added the chemicals in the rinse you could wash the filter twice.
It saved me tons of money the inner and outer filters on some of the equipment could cost $ 250.00 in the year 2000. 
lol I never lost a Cat engine from a faulty air cleaner,Filter Minders sell air filters every piece of equipment I owned had 1 on the dash they were more trouble than they were worth IMO.
A friggn hung over operator would shut your equipment down because it was in the yellow just to take a nap I plugged every one on every piece of equipment we owned.My service guy was smart enough to know when the filter needed changing  
        

 72 
 on: September 29, 2016, 07:26:10 AM 
Started by Scott & Heather - Last post by TomC
When I was driving my truck, it had 4 fuel tanks (2-150gal Diesel fuel tanks, 1-75gal gasoline tank, 1-75gal water tank), 6 aluminum wheels with park ranger hats, 2 buddy boxes (one was the generator). Needless to say, was a weekend job to polish everything. Paying someone to do it was well worth it.
I had one friend that polished his fuel tanks so much, he had to replace them because they got too thin. I doubt you have to worry about that with aluminum wheels though-since they are so thick. Good Luck, TomC

 73 
 on: September 29, 2016, 07:18:42 AM 
Started by belfert - Last post by TomC
On my truck, I have a dash mounted (helps with front engine) air filter restriction gauge. You can see almost zero restriction when it is new, and gradually getting dirty. I believe change when it got to 10" restriction.
Also have a fuel filter restriction gauge for the same reason. Gives you warning that you need to change the filter well in advance of loosing power.
Just to give you an idea of how many gauges you can have, here's the list of what you can have (at least with a twin screw [tandem] drive) truck: Speedometer, odometer, trip odometer, tachometer, engine hour meter (in tachometer), engine oil pressure, engine oil temperature, engine water temp, pyrometer (exhaust temp), fuel filter restriction, fuel pressure, air filter restriction, volts, ammeter, trans temp, front drive axle temp, rear drive axle temp, front air pressure, rear air pressure, brake application. Going to add an altimeter (have one open gauge spot). Good Luck, TomC

 74 
 on: September 29, 2016, 06:30:39 AM 
Started by belfert - Last post by DoubleEagle
At least on my air filter, the dirty air comes from the outside of the filter to the inside-then into the engine. Hence the little wood block has no way of getting into the turbo.
Highly recommend you do NOT use compressed air to blow out an air filter. In doing so, you can create small micro holes in the filter and allow dust into the engine-that will basically sand down the rings until they don't seal anymore, prematurely. Air filter elements are relatively cheap (>$100). Much cheaper than an engine overhaul. Good Luck, TomC

If you use too much pressure or hold the air nozzle too close to the filter, yes, but applying an air flow that is more gentle from a distance will not be much different than the air flow coming in when the engine is running. The big air filter elements are priced just a bit above my level of cheapness, but then, I am pretty frugal.  Roll Eyes

 75 
 on: September 29, 2016, 06:23:16 AM 
Started by Geom - Last post by Detroitenginespecialist
We received George's engine 2 days ago and we are anticipating that it will be ready to ship back to him next week.

 76 
 on: September 29, 2016, 06:15:26 AM 
Started by Scott & Heather - Last post by bigred
Scott,I found some stuff at a truck stop that has really worked well for me.I am going to the bus in a little bit and will get the name of it for you,

 77 
 on: September 29, 2016, 03:01:38 AM 
Started by Scott & Heather - Last post by Scott & Heather
Update, our rims needed some love...so we paid $320 to these peeps to sand and polish them. They also polished all the stainless hardware/door latches as well as the frame around my generator bay. Next year they said it would be much cheaper since the hard work restoring the finish is now done. I'll keep up with it using mothers. The wheels really need a professional refinisher to work on them off the coach to make them look like new again, but honestly from 4 feet away, they look amazing. And the new center caps are...quite shiny Smiley



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 78 
 on: September 28, 2016, 10:19:08 PM 
Started by belfert - Last post by TomC
At least on my air filter, the dirty air comes from the outside of the filter to the inside-then into the engine. Hence the little wood block has no way of getting into the turbo.
Highly recommend you do NOT use compressed air to blow out an air filter. In doing so, you can create small micro holes in the filter and allow dust into the engine-that will basically sand down the rings until they don't seal anymore, prematurely. Air filter elements are relatively cheap (>$100). Much cheaper than an engine overhaul. Good Luck, TomC

 79 
 on: September 28, 2016, 09:58:12 PM 
Started by RJ - Last post by pvcces
Hi, RJ.

I'm sure that you know that lead acid batteries produce gas when overcharged. That gas is a perfect mixture for ignition. If the slightest spark occurs inside the battery, the mixture explodes violently. This why safety caps are used.

Since most sparks occur during discharges, gas production is very low UNLESS the battery is agressively overcharged.

Since batteries in a hot environment have lower voltage between the posts, a charger set to a fixed voltage can easily overcharge a battery. When the battery is overcharged, it gets rid of that energy as heat, unless the charger output voltage is reduced enough to prevent heating.

This makes a temperature compensating regulator a must.

In cold weather, the situation is reversed and the batteries fail to recharge in service.

Your mileage may vary. If you can stay on top of this, you should have very little trouble.

Good luck.

Tom Caffrey

 80 
 on: September 28, 2016, 09:16:58 PM 
Started by Seangie - Last post by Dreamscape
We had the pleasure of meeting you guys and will remember it forever!

So glad you are on a new adventure and will continue to stay connected. One day you might hear from us, hope you will have that space to park ours!  Wink

September 27, 2014 Abilene, TX


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