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 91 
 on: October 17, 2017, 03:55:46 AM 
Started by VelvetLounger - Last post by chessie4905
10 ga. extension cords adding up to that length is going to get pretty expensive. Have you considered a portable generator? A 4 to 5 kw generator from Harbor Freight might do the job. Smaller one if your needs are lower. Just a thought. If you are going with cords, you could do that first 50,100 or 150 with 50 amp, then drop down to 30 amp #10 with adapter. Unless you don't plan on going with 50 amp in your coach, those cords can be used in future at camp grounds if hook up isn't close.
https://www.harborfreight.com/engines-generators/gas-engine-generators/4000-max-starting3200-running-watts-65-hp-212cc-generator-carb-with-gfci-outlet-protection-63089.html

 92 
 on: October 17, 2017, 02:03:41 AM 
Started by JT4SC - Last post by richard5933
Couple of things...

1) If you're trying to charge the 12v house batteries from the 24v chassis batteries, then keep using the Vanner. There are some great instructions and wiring diagrams on their website which will show you the correct way to connect things together. They also show some ways not to connect things, so pay attention to which is which. I believe the Vanner will draw from your chassis batteries even when you are not actively using it, so the switch for the chassis batteries should go between the batteries and whatever is connected. The purpose of the Vanner is to draw 12v from your 24v battery bank while maintaining an equalized charge to the 24v batteries. If you simply tapped into the point between the two batteries you'd get 12v, but doing it that way would cause one of the 24v bank batteries to overcharge, the other to undercharge, etc. The Vanner is designed to tap into the 24v bank and pull out the 12v properly.

2) My guess is that the solenoid was their at one time to enable you to connect/disconnect something (don't know what) from a distant location, probably the dash. The solenoid is nothing more than an electrically activated switch. The two large lugs are for the line that you want to make/break. Doesn't matter which of the large lugs is used for the two ends of the line that you are seeking to make/break, as those two lugs function as a simple on/off switch. The two small lugs are the power to the magnetic coil which activates the internal switch. Put + to one of the small lugs and - to the other and you'll open/close the contacts. Most I've seen are normally open and applying power closes the switch. You'll have to investigate to see if the solenoid is 12v or 24v. Maybe the solenoid was originally wired to automatically turn off the Vanner when the bus was not running?

3) The battery switch looks like a Blue Sea. If it is, they have diagrams for all their switches posted on the individual pages for each switch. Get the diagram - it will be helpful. The 1 & 2 switch can be used to connect two loads to one source OR to connect two sources to one load. In other words, you can use it to switch one load between two different battery banks, or you can use it to switch one battery bank between two different charging sources. I'm not sure how you're using it, but from the diagram you posted it looks someone was using it slightly differently than either of those. First though, are you sure that the lead labelled as coming from the bus battery alternator isn't actually coming from the Vanner? Would make more sense. What it looks like is someone connected the battery switch to give you four options: a) disconnect house batteries, b) charge house batteries, c) use house batteries to run inverter AND to isolate from chassis batteries, d) or both b & c.

There are still a lot of options on how to get this set up. Still lots of unknowns as well. Do you know what the solenoid was being used for?

Hope this helps.

Richard

 93 
 on: October 16, 2017, 10:14:50 PM 
Started by brianzero - Last post by eagle19952
That joint is supposed to pivot not be welded??? I'm missing something...


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which begs the question...why did they waste a grease fitting ? Smiley

 94 
 on: October 16, 2017, 10:13:13 PM 
Started by VelvetLounger - Last post by eagle19952
Hey OP here.

So this is a temporary but long term solution. For now its just to give the bus power for doing some work and running basic systems like heating in winter. Its gas heat so not too much electrical demand. I cant make the distance any shorter than 250 feet.

The bus is wired for 30 amp service. I am going to do this as an extension cord that gets plugged in at both ends. The garage where I am plugging in has both 120 and 240 available but I will be plugging into a 120 volt circuit.

I have an electrician friend say that a 10 gauge extension cord will work as long as the bus is using low amps.

Any objections to this? Obviously I would use waterproof connectors for any outdoor connections.

Thanks!

the only downside i see is that the wire won't be much use for anything else. for a few dollars more you can have something more versatile.

 95 
 on: October 16, 2017, 10:10:24 PM 
Started by Scott & Heather - Last post by eagle19952
Eek. Ok. I'm scared and I'm running away. So it appears I'm stuck with a 2015 Ford Expedition... they can flat tow, and it has the room we need for our family.


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Have you considered pre-2015 Honda CRV's
or a Ford Flex ?

what are you going to do with 365hp ?

i think the 8v92 has spoiled you  Grin

 96 
 on: October 16, 2017, 10:02:35 PM 
Started by VelvetLounger - Last post by VelvetLounger
Hey OP here.

So this is a temporary but long term solution. For now its just to give the bus power for doing some work and running basic systems like heating in winter. Its gas heat so not too much electrical demand. I cant make the distance any shorter than 250 feet.

The bus is wired for 30 amp service. I am going to do this as an extension cord that gets plugged in at both ends. The garage where I am plugging in has both 120 and 240 available but I will be plugging into a 120 volt circuit.

I have an electrician friend say that a 10 gauge extension cord will work as long as the bus is using low amps.

Any objections to this? Obviously I would use waterproof connectors for any outdoor connections.

Thanks!

 97 
 on: October 16, 2017, 09:33:44 PM 
Started by Scott & Heather - Last post by Scott & Heather
Eek. Ok. I'm scared and I'm running away. So it appears I'm stuck with a 2015 Ford Expedition... they can flat tow, and it has the room we need for our family.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

 98 
 on: October 16, 2017, 09:32:31 PM 
Started by brianzero - Last post by Scott & Heather
That joint is supposed to pivot not be welded??? I'm missing something...


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 99 
 on: October 16, 2017, 09:02:21 PM 
Started by JT4SC - Last post by JT4SC
Hi Richard/ BW-

This will be a 12 volt house battery bank.   This was how it was when I bought the bus and my goal is just to make it better (balanced) and safe; neither was the case when I bought it.  I'm also trying to understand why the battery switch is there and if it should be modified to work within an overall more logical/correct system.  Of course I didn't know any of this because I'm coming from a place of knowing nothing about busses or conversions, so it's been a lot of learning.  I'm thankful for all your help!!!!

The way the battery switch is configured has also not been changed in any way since I bought it.  I remember Mike trying to explain it along with the rest of the bus but it was like drinking from a fire hose kind of information overload.  I'm laughing to myself as I write this because of how naive I was.  I was 28 going on 15.  Ugh!!

Bevans6 -

My bus system is 24 volt.  The bus batteries are 2 8D batteries in series. The house batteries are 12 volt.  

I've attached 2 pictures:
-  first picture is a close up of the solenoid located in the bus battery comparment, with the red wire on left of solenoid running from the bus battery compartment back to the house battery switch.  

- second picture is one I took a couple years ago when I tried to burn my bus down.  It shows the the solenoid with the red wire fried where it connects with the solenoid.  I've since added an in-line fuse.  The main reason I wanted to share this pic was to show how it is also connected to the Vanner (which I am still trying to understand).  

My understanding is the bus batteries help charge the house batteries but not the other way around.  
So far with your help I know I need to move the inverter positive cable to the switch and not have it directly connected to the battery bank.  However I don't know which port on the switch it should go, and if I need to move/remove any of the other cables which are currently connected to the switch.  If possible can you post a pic of how you have the back of your marine switch hooked up?

** note it wouldn't let me post the close-up pic of the solenoid because of the file size, I will try to reduce the size and post it.  

 100 
 on: October 16, 2017, 07:37:47 PM 
Started by brianzero - Last post by gumpy
Well, I guess I don't understand where the break was because I don't see any welds on the upper part where I thought you were referring. Looks like you welded the jamb nut to the threaded rod as well as to the lower female end.

Well, if it gets you home, that's the goal, and then you can address it properly. 

Good luck on the remainder of the trip.

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