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Author Topic: Wind Turbine  (Read 6501 times)
Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
1989, MCI 102C3, 8V92T, HT740, 06' conversion FMCA# F-27317-S "Wife- 1969 Italian/German Style"
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« on: November 08, 2008, 02:43:51 PM »

Hi Guy's,

I just started a new project for the bus. I purchaced a 400watt wind turbine that I am mounting to the roof of my shed that my

bus backs up to. I figure that since I keep the Proheat running all winter, I would try and generate enough power to keep the

battery bank charged up. The turbine arrived yesterday and today,  I ordered 30ft. of 1 1/2" sch 40 galv pipe. I figured that since

it is always windy here during the winter, it would make more sence then solar panels. Plus, it will still generate at night!

Let me know what you think.
http://www.southwestpv.com/Catalog/Wind%20Power/AIR403.HTM

As soon as I get these 3 big boiler replacment jobs done this week, I hope to have time next weekend to install it.

Nick-

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« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2008, 03:22:42 PM »

No personal experience, though I've been an avid reader of Home Power for a few years. My understanding is these small wind turbine can be very noisy, especially if attached to living space, which it seems your will not be.

This is something I've been considering, too, though I'd like to find one that can be stowed easly and take it with me on the road and set it up when we're parked. Maybe attach a pole to the hitch of the bus. I think solar panels mounted on the bus roof would probably provide more power, though, and be easier to use.

Anyway, please keep us updated as you go forward with this project.

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Craig Shepard
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« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2008, 03:31:25 PM »

Another non expert here.  When they rate it at 400 watts, I am guessing that is figured at something like a 30 mph wind.  I was once looking into installing a wind turbine at home.  If you have dependable wind, it seemed that you get more watts/dollar from it than solar.  It can be noisy though.  I sounds like you should be able to produce more power than you need for the batteries.  I think that I, as well as others, would be very interested in how it goes.
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« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2008, 04:24:32 PM »

How does the wind generator compensate for differing rotor speed, or doesn't it matter with DC?  I know the big wind turbines automatically rotate the blades to keep the generator at a constant speed and they put the blades in a neutral position if it gets too  windy.

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« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2008, 05:03:16 PM »

Northern AZ Wind has info and spec's on wind turbines if any of you are interested in one   www.wind-sun.com I read where they work best with winds 12-25 mph and need 7 mph to start       good luck
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Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
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« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2008, 07:05:36 PM »

Hi Guy's,

Craig is thinking what I was..... Taking it with me on the road. Craig, hitch mount is a very good idea! Now ya got me thinking..

This unit is very small and light. It could easily fit in one corner of a bay, poles and all.
Nick-

video
http://video.google.com/videosearch?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4TSHB_enUS230US233&q=air+x&um=1&sa=X&oi=video_result_group&resnum=7&ct=title#

Here is the write up on the turbine I have


Introducing the latest evolution in small wind turbines. The AIR-X builds upon what has made AIR the world’s #1 selling small wind turbine with new technology previously found only in today’s state-of-the-art mega-watt-class wind turbines.

All of these features are primarily found within the body of the turbine. The new microprocessor based turbine controller results in increased performance, improved battery charging capability, greater reliability and the reduction of flutter noise from the machine.

The controller allows for peak-power tracking of the wind by optimizing the alternator’s output on all points of the cubic curve and then efficiently delivers the energy to the battery. The turbines smart controller allows it to actually control blade rotation speed thus eliminating the buzzing noise commonly found with the AIR 403 and 303 in high winds. Furthermore, a new series of carbon-reinforced blades with a modified pitch angle further increases power production.

Much Lower Noise: Previous AIR wind modules relied on their aero-elastic blade design for protection in high winds. This caused a loud flutter noise in winds above 35 mph (16 m/s). AIR-Xs circuit monitors the wind speed and electronically slows the blades as it reaches its rated output preventing it from going into flutter. This results in a much quieter wind turbine. In high winds, the AIR-X will continue to produce power at a reduced level until the wind decreases, at which point maximum potential output will resume. The Benefit: Quieter and neighbor friendly wind turbine.

Improved battery charging: Previous AIR designs required 300-400 amp hour battery banks so the trickle charge of the wind turbine could be adequately absorbed. The AIR-Xs charge controller periodically stops charging, reads the battery voltage, compares it to the voltage setting and if the battery is charged, it completely shuts off all current going to the battery. This function is performed within a few milliseconds. The closer the battery is to reaching its full state of charge, the more often the AIR-Xs circuit repeats this action. This means any size battery bank from 25 to 25,000 amp hours or higher can be charged safely. When the battery has reached its charged state, the AIR-X will slow to an almost complete stop. Only when the battery has dropped below its voltage set point will it startup and resume charging. The Benefit: Extended battery life, no overcharging.

Lower stress design: AIR-X limits power on the input side of the electronics by controlling the torque from the blades. The power no longer has to be dissipated by the electronics resulting in lower stress on the circuit, bearings and other materials. Furthermore, stress on wind turbines occurs primarily in high winds. Under these conditions, the electronic stall design reduces the blade speed to 600 rpm, thereby significantly reducing turbine and tower loading while still producing power.

« Last Edit: November 08, 2008, 07:18:03 PM by Nick Badame Refrig. Co. » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2008, 07:47:38 PM »

Nick

I had the earlier model which fluttered the blades when it hit over speed and flattened and the noise was not that bad to me but some neighbors in RV park complained.

I never had to charge batteries in the 7 years I had it operating and it was hooked to a bank of 6 volt trojans 105's and it's still operating today up in Seligman AZ.

It will keep your batteries charged and I had a a dpdt toggle switch and could apply brake and stop it completely or a very slow barely turning in winds over 35 mph. I believe you will be happy with it but get it at least 20 feet above any buildings within 100 feet if possible.

Larry H
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« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2008, 07:52:11 PM »

Nick, my boating friends...mostly sailboats...say the only drawback is the noise.  Your application should not have that problem. 
Jack
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cody
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« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2008, 08:31:56 PM »

I saw a write up about a wind turbine that used a different blade design that looked kinda like an old time egg beater instead of blades, the article talked about it haveing a more effective pattern for operating at lower wind speeds and was much quieter, something about it being used in europe now, I can't remember where i saw the article, anyone else see it?
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« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2008, 08:57:35 PM »

I saw a write up about a wind turbine that used a different blade design that looked kinda like an old time egg beater instead of blades, the article talked about it haveing a more effective pattern for operating at lower wind speeds and was much quieter, something about it being used in europe now, I can't remember where i saw the article, anyone else see it?


http://www.livescience.com/environment/080910-pf-energy-ball.html
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cody
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« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2008, 09:02:49 PM »

Yep, thats the one I was talking about.
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« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2008, 06:31:50 AM »

Home of the small wind turbines (left click)

Now go where the wind is and have fun.

FWIW

Sojourn for Christ, Gerald
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« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2008, 06:45:39 PM »

With your skills Nick,  I would have expected you to go vertical. Cheesy



or



 i saw someting similar a while back
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« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2008, 05:31:09 AM »

The vertical sort work on a fundamentally different aerodynamic principle (drag rather than lift) and as such are not capable of producing as much power as a horizontal axis turbine. If you think about it is simplistic terms, a vertical turbine always has one side of the blade being 'pushed into' the wind, so a lot of power is lost. They do have the advantage of being able to work in wind coming from any direction without having to pivot, which is especially useful in gusty conditions. They also turn a lot more slowly, so produce less noise. Even the very fancy vertical-axis turbines with curved corkscrew-shaped blades have to be very big though to produce any useful power.

Jeremy
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« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2008, 06:55:53 AM »

That AIR X and/or AIR403 are the ones I'll be buying, when the time for adding wind to the sails comes along. Read a ton over the years and they seem to be the standard in that size range.

And you'll be hard pressed to find anyone complain about their performance or reliability. Problems are usually installer/designer based, not in the turbine.

The weed whacker noises from it spinning are more than compensated for by the absence of a running generator....Ask the complainers if they'd like you to fire up 'ol smokey?

Keep us updated, this is a good one for the boondockers to live vicariously through!

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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