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Author Topic: Interior walls?  (Read 4211 times)
grantgoold
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« on: November 10, 2008, 01:44:51 PM »

I am looking for some insight into the building of interior walls. What size lumber have you used to build out the interior walls. I am going to build the bathroom walls, including a pocket door, this weekend and want to get the materials ready. Have you used 2x4s, 1x2? ......

Thanks

Grant
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« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2008, 01:59:47 PM »

for most the walls. i used riped down 2x4`s
i rip them on my table saw into 4 1x2`s which in real life equills 13/16 by 1-1/2
that maks walls thin enuf to not waste space and thick enuf to run wires and outlets and switches
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« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2008, 02:00:52 PM »

The only 2 walls I have are the walls that seperate the bathroom from the kitchen where there is a pocket door and the bathroom and the BR. I used 1x2's which was enough to house the electrical switches. 2x4's are way overkill and take up too much room.
On my pocket door, I used extended drawer slides on the bottom and made a track for the top. The door is a 3x4 inch ply covered on all sides with matching laminate! Has worked great for the last ah, say 4 years. Never needed adjusting, yet and it stays closed while travelling via a small barrel latch.
Ace
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« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2008, 02:31:34 PM »

Wish I had a Pic of this, but will try to explain. I saw a bus with a pocket door, but it did not have a pocket!! So I guess it was not really a pocket door. The door simply slid out to close bathroom, it was against wall behind toilet when open and slid on track to close of bath area. Very simple concept and saves a wall. Looked goood also.
 I bought a pocket door assembly and with some tweaking used that as the wall. Wires were run in void betweeen assembly and outside wall and then over door.
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« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2008, 02:42:59 PM »

I try to find nice and true (a challenge) 2x2 material for the bottom plates, and then depending on it's purpose, either 2x2 or 2x4s for the studs, utilizing the 2x sides for the wall thickness.  If in the center of a wall I use 2x2, if a corner or door frame I'll use the 2x4, again turned 90 degrees.  Hope that makes sense.

I've taken plenty of high-end conversions apart in the last few years and see much less strength built into them, but they suffer from that, with walls that move.  One was a Parliament conversion and the other from Superior Coach.  On both, interestingly, they used 1/4 inch plywood in places I wouldn't dream of, especially in million $+ coaches!

I'll try to dig up some pics.

Todd
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« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2008, 02:54:05 PM »

Todd i am very interested in those pictures if you manage to dig them up!
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« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2008, 04:31:59 PM »

me to please post pictures if possible.
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« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2008, 04:47:47 PM »

On my bathroom walls I used 3/4" furniture grade plywood with birch wood vineer.  This is available at Home Depot and is really nice to work with. It has very few if any voids in the plys and while one side is furniture grade, the other side is also grade B finished that still looks great when varnished with 2 or 3 coats of gloss clear.  On independent panels that needed stiffening, I used 1.5" by 3/16" angle iron on the inside with a 1.5" wide by 3/16" steel plate running the length on the outside.  Some might not like it since it looks a bit industrial strength, but this way my walls are only 3/4" thick!  I'd do the same technique again-it makes for a stiff wall.  Good Luck, TomC
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« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2008, 05:24:52 PM »

Grant,

Consider folding doors. Cheap and easy to mount or replace. My bus came with them and I'm sure they came from HD.
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« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2008, 06:30:03 PM »

OK, found one kinda similar to what I mentioned.  This is an inside shot from a bathroom.  the walls fore and aft were 2x4, with 4 inch depth for electrical and a/v boxes, where the wall towards the aisle the 2x4s were turned to flat side, to save an additional 1.5 inches of width for aisle.

You can see in the corners that I "L'd" the 2x4s, then screwed them together.  A very strong corner!  Let me put it this way, with my 250 pound butt I could lean into this corner and rock the whole bus without any deflection to the corner.  Before closing up the inside walls of the bath, I insulated the walls, for sound mostly.  The bathroom was so air-tight that when you turn the fan on, it will suck the door closed even when open 3 inches.  Alleviating the other bathroom concern, odors creeping into the rest of the cabin.

Anyways, I don't scrimp on interior walls at all, I figure that they will probably last the longest in any conversion.  I put 1/2 inch hardwood plywood on both sides of the studs, glued and screwed!

Todd
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« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2008, 06:37:28 PM »

I use 2X3 studs and 2X2 which were usually available at home depot and lowes.
you could also rip 2X4's to make an odd size...
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« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2008, 08:48:08 PM »

I used metal studs in my walls to save weight.  I used 1 5/8" studs for the bunk walls.  I used 2 1/2" studs for the bathroom to accomodate the plumbing.

Brian Elfert
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« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2008, 06:02:17 AM »

Wish I had a Pic of this, but will try to explain. I saw a bus with a pocket door, but it did not have a pocket!! So I guess it was not really a pocket door. The door simply slid out to close bathroom, it was against wall behind toilet when open and slid on track to close of bath area. Very simple concept and saves a wall. Looked goood also.
 

   That was probably ou bus. Instead of purchasing a pocket door frame, we just purchased the track. we attached this to the ceiling, made our door using a 5/4 red oak frame with 1/4" red oak flat panels. After hanging the door  "cover strips" of 1X2 oak attached to  the ceiling on either side of the track block the track from view.
   When in the open position it is against the wall behind the toilet. When closed it blocks the hallway between the kitchen and bathroom. We have a similar door between the bathroom and bedroom that is on the bedroom side of the shower when open and blocks the opening between the bedrrom and bathroom when closed.
  Using 5/4 oak for framing gave us a door thickness of 1 1/8" when finished. Total space used for door (door thickness and a little clearance between door and wall) is about 1 3/16".  Jack
« Last Edit: November 11, 2008, 03:38:19 PM by JackConrad » Logged

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« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2008, 08:00:29 AM »

Hi Grant,
I agree with Brian Elfert. Why use wood at all? Metal studs are STRAIGHT and stay STRAIGHT. They are as easy, or easier, to work with as wood and did I mention that they stay STRAIGHT. Good luck with whatever you decide to use.
Sam 4106
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« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2008, 03:24:41 PM »

 My memory is not very good, I forgot about your bus Jack!  I thinking it was Gary's bus, but my memory is not very good.  Jim
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« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2008, 06:06:53 PM »

Jack, thanks for the pictures. It has got me thinking about how to make the work and keep the wall thickness to an acceptable minimum. Now, can you describe how you keep the door closed and what about the door moving or "slapping" when driving? Do you also have a track on the floor?

Thanks

Grant
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Grant Goold
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« Reply #16 on: November 11, 2008, 06:27:27 PM »

It took me a while but I found a picture showing my wall studs and pocket door while it was being made prior to laminate covering. Had to make sure it worked first! Anyway, you cant see the top track but you can plainly see the bottom extended drawer guide! Since this picture was taken, there was a 3/4 inch plywood wall up against (not touching) the door forming the pocket and that would be the start of my cabinetry in the kitchen.


Ace
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« Reply #17 on: November 11, 2008, 06:31:34 PM »

Here is another pic a little further done. The pocket door actually is behind the refrigerator on the right!

Ace
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grantgoold
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« Reply #18 on: November 11, 2008, 06:54:00 PM »

Ace, thanks for the pictures!

I was hoping to see if anyone has used steel studs that are smaller than the 2x4? I want to save as many inches as possible and with a 3/8 or 1/2 exterior panel on each wall I think I can save nearly 6 inches of wasted wall space. 

Anyone used smaller steel studs?
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Grant Goold
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« Reply #19 on: November 11, 2008, 07:06:57 PM »

Hi Grant,
I agree with Brian Elfert. Why use wood at all? Metal studs are STRAIGHT and stay STRAIGHT. They are as easy, or easier, to work with as wood and did I mention that they stay STRAIGHT. Good luck with whatever you decide to use.
Sam 4106

Sam, did you have any problem with the steel studs attaching to the top plate where the roof has a curve in it going toward the wall?

Dean
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« Reply #20 on: November 11, 2008, 07:08:44 PM »

Ace, thanks for the pictures!

I was hoping to see if anyone has used steel studs that are smaller than the 2x4? I want to save as many inches as possible and with a 3/8 or 1/2 exterior panel on each wall I think I can save nearly 6 inches of wasted wall space. 

Anyone used smaller steel studs?

I haven't seen any mention of using steel tubing, you can buy it in just about any size, shape, or gauge. No worries about taking up a bunch of space using steel or wood studs.
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« Reply #21 on: November 11, 2008, 07:50:25 PM »

Paul; my last BlueBird had tubing for wall framing with foam between the plywood the only problem I ever had was my wife wanting to redo a wall in the bathroom it is almost impossible to remodel with steel tubing welded in place   

have a great evening
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« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2008, 05:05:28 AM »

Jack, thanks for the pictures. It has got me thinking about how to make the work and keep the wall thickness to an acceptable minimum. Now, can you describe how you keep the door closed and what about the door moving or "slapping" when driving? Do you also have a track on the floor?
Thanks Grant

No track on the floor, only a guide.  We originally tried a barrel catch that the door seated into when open, but it did not always hold. We then installed a barrel catch near the ceiling that goes into a hole in the piece of oak trim on the ceiling. This catch holds the door in both the open and closed position (using different holes in the ceiling trim).  If you open or enlarge the photo of the door , you can see the barrel bolt in the top right hand corner of the door. Jack
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« Reply #23 on: November 12, 2008, 08:10:43 AM »

Hi wvnative,
Forming the plate to fit the contour of the ceiling if relatively easy. Use an aviation snips to cut the sides of the plate to form any curves then tack weld the overlaping metal at the cuts. By making your cuts close together you can form a very tight curve. Clamp or tack weld one side, after you are satisfied with the fit, then clamp the piece to a flat surface before tack welding the other side. Otherwise, you may have a compound curve in the piece. It helps that I have many years of metalworking experience, but if you are careful, you can do a good job. I placed my 1 1/2" studs 12" apart and after I had my electrical boxes and wiring in I filled the cavities with block foam insulation for sound deadening and full backing for the 1/4" luan plywood I used behind the wall paper.
Paul Hastings' idea of using square or rectangular tubing is also a good suggestion. Your choice.
Good luck, Sam 4106
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« Reply #24 on: November 12, 2008, 10:12:32 AM »

I was hoping to see if anyone has used steel studs that are smaller than the 2x4? I want to save as many inches as possible and with a 3/8 or 1/2 exterior panel on each wall I think I can save nearly 6 inches of wasted wall space. 

I used 1 5/8" steel studs around my bunks and 2 1/2" steel studs for the bathroom walls.  No 2x4 (really 3 1/2") studs used here.
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« Reply #25 on: November 13, 2008, 05:14:22 PM »

I think I am going to go with the 1.5 inch steel studs and 1/4 plywood. Thanks for all the help and suggestions. I think I may also try the slider door that doesn't require a true pocket door frame, again saving valuable space. I hope this gives the impression of a much larger space.

Thanks

Grant
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« Reply #26 on: November 14, 2008, 07:45:08 PM »

I justused 3/4" plywood for walls and I too built a pocket door with no pocket.  Jerry
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