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Author Topic: Interior walls?  (Read 4352 times)
grantgoold
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« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2008, 06:06:53 PM »

Jack, thanks for the pictures. It has got me thinking about how to make the work and keep the wall thickness to an acceptable minimum. Now, can you describe how you keep the door closed and what about the door moving or "slapping" when driving? Do you also have a track on the floor?

Thanks

Grant
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Grant Goold
1984 MCI 9
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Citrus Heights, California
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« Reply #16 on: November 11, 2008, 06:27:27 PM »

It took me a while but I found a picture showing my wall studs and pocket door while it was being made prior to laminate covering. Had to make sure it worked first! Anyway, you cant see the top track but you can plainly see the bottom extended drawer guide! Since this picture was taken, there was a 3/4 inch plywood wall up against (not touching) the door forming the pocket and that would be the start of my cabinetry in the kitchen.


Ace
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« Reply #17 on: November 11, 2008, 06:31:34 PM »

Here is another pic a little further done. The pocket door actually is behind the refrigerator on the right!

Ace
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grantgoold
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« Reply #18 on: November 11, 2008, 06:54:00 PM »

Ace, thanks for the pictures!

I was hoping to see if anyone has used steel studs that are smaller than the 2x4? I want to save as many inches as possible and with a 3/8 or 1/2 exterior panel on each wall I think I can save nearly 6 inches of wasted wall space. 

Anyone used smaller steel studs?
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Grant Goold
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Citrus Heights, California
wvanative
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« Reply #19 on: November 11, 2008, 07:06:57 PM »

Hi Grant,
I agree with Brian Elfert. Why use wood at all? Metal studs are STRAIGHT and stay STRAIGHT. They are as easy, or easier, to work with as wood and did I mention that they stay STRAIGHT. Good luck with whatever you decide to use.
Sam 4106

Sam, did you have any problem with the steel studs attaching to the top plate where the roof has a curve in it going toward the wall?

Dean
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Dean Hamilton Villa Grove, IL East Central IL. Near Champaign
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paulcjhastings
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« Reply #20 on: November 11, 2008, 07:08:44 PM »

Ace, thanks for the pictures!

I was hoping to see if anyone has used steel studs that are smaller than the 2x4? I want to save as many inches as possible and with a 3/8 or 1/2 exterior panel on each wall I think I can save nearly 6 inches of wasted wall space. 

Anyone used smaller steel studs?

I haven't seen any mention of using steel tubing, you can buy it in just about any size, shape, or gauge. No worries about taking up a bunch of space using steel or wood studs.
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Paul Hastings
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« Reply #21 on: November 11, 2008, 07:50:25 PM »

Paul; my last BlueBird had tubing for wall framing with foam between the plywood the only problem I ever had was my wife wanting to redo a wall in the bathroom it is almost impossible to remodel with steel tubing welded in place   

have a great evening
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JackConrad
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« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2008, 05:05:28 AM »

Jack, thanks for the pictures. It has got me thinking about how to make the work and keep the wall thickness to an acceptable minimum. Now, can you describe how you keep the door closed and what about the door moving or "slapping" when driving? Do you also have a track on the floor?
Thanks Grant

No track on the floor, only a guide.  We originally tried a barrel catch that the door seated into when open, but it did not always hold. We then installed a barrel catch near the ceiling that goes into a hole in the piece of oak trim on the ceiling. This catch holds the door in both the open and closed position (using different holes in the ceiling trim).  If you open or enlarge the photo of the door , you can see the barrel bolt in the top right hand corner of the door. Jack
« Last Edit: November 12, 2008, 05:08:56 AM by JackConrad » Logged

Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
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Sam 4106
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« Reply #23 on: November 12, 2008, 08:10:43 AM »

Hi wvnative,
Forming the plate to fit the contour of the ceiling if relatively easy. Use an aviation snips to cut the sides of the plate to form any curves then tack weld the overlaping metal at the cuts. By making your cuts close together you can form a very tight curve. Clamp or tack weld one side, after you are satisfied with the fit, then clamp the piece to a flat surface before tack welding the other side. Otherwise, you may have a compound curve in the piece. It helps that I have many years of metalworking experience, but if you are careful, you can do a good job. I placed my 1 1/2" studs 12" apart and after I had my electrical boxes and wiring in I filled the cavities with block foam insulation for sound deadening and full backing for the 1/4" luan plywood I used behind the wall paper.
Paul Hastings' idea of using square or rectangular tubing is also a good suggestion. Your choice.
Good luck, Sam 4106
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1976 MCI-8TA with 8V92 DDEC II and Allison HT740
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« Reply #24 on: November 12, 2008, 10:12:32 AM »

I was hoping to see if anyone has used steel studs that are smaller than the 2x4? I want to save as many inches as possible and with a 3/8 or 1/2 exterior panel on each wall I think I can save nearly 6 inches of wasted wall space. 

I used 1 5/8" steel studs around my bunks and 2 1/2" steel studs for the bathroom walls.  No 2x4 (really 3 1/2") studs used here.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
grantgoold
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« Reply #25 on: November 13, 2008, 05:14:22 PM »

I think I am going to go with the 1.5 inch steel studs and 1/4 plywood. Thanks for all the help and suggestions. I think I may also try the slider door that doesn't require a true pocket door frame, again saving valuable space. I hope this gives the impression of a much larger space.

Thanks

Grant
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Grant Goold
1984 MCI 9
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Jerry32
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« Reply #26 on: November 14, 2008, 07:45:08 PM »

I justused 3/4" plywood for walls and I too built a pocket door with no pocket.  Jerry
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1988 MCI 102A3 8V92TA 740
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