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Author Topic: hybrid trucks  (Read 1025 times)
David Anderson
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South Texas in the Eagle Ford Shale area




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« on: June 23, 2006, 08:19:31 AM »

This is a bit off topic but could be bus related in the future.  I just read an article in the Wall Street Journal that the EPA patented a system that uses hydrolic fluid to compress nitrogen gas in medium duty trucks during braking.  The compressed gas is then used to turn the drive wheels in stop and go traffic, which is quite different from the current hybrids on the market now.   The EPA is partnering with Ford and UPS to install the devices in UPS delivery trucks.  The prototype results show a savings of 60% in fuel and nearly non existant wear on the brakes of the trucks. 

The device runs about $7000 and UPS estimates a 3 year payback.  That sounds pretty promising.  Maybe it can be used in transit busess in the future.  This is the 1st time I've ever read of the EPA doing something to actually help us make our lives better instead of forcing punitive fines and litigation against someone.

David Anderson
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Dallas
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« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2006, 09:25:01 AM »

This is a bit off topic but could be bus related in the future.  I just read an article in the Wall Street Journal that the EPA patented a system that uses hydrolic fluid to compress nitrogen gas in medium duty trucks during braking.  The compressed gas is then used to turn the drive wheels in stop and go traffic, which is quite different from the current hybrids on the market now.   The EPA is partnering with Ford and UPS to install the devices in UPS delivery trucks.  The prototype results show a savings of 60% in fuel and nearly non existant wear on the brakes of the trucks. 

The device runs about $7000 and UPS estimates a 3 year payback.  That sounds pretty promising.  Maybe it can be used in transit busess in the future.  This is the 1st time I've ever read of the EPA doing something to actually help us make our lives better instead of forcing punitive fines and litigation against someone.

David Anderson

Hmm,
This could scare me spitless.
A government agency obtaining a patent for a process? that means that the government is getting into the private sector.
That isn't happy making..... at all.

Dallas
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OneLapper
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« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2006, 06:58:12 PM »

Four or five years ago I read an article in Auto Week about a company in Australia that had developed a hyd motor that fit inline with the drive shaft.  On decelleration the driveling motor pumped hyd fluid from a resevoir into a tank that had a sliding piston seperating the fluid from nitrogen that was under extremely high pressure.  The energy from decellerating was stored in the tank by compressing the nitrogen.  It was then released when the truck was accellerating or starting off.  It was supposed to be tested by the military according to the article.

Mark
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OneLapper
1964 PD4106-2853
www.markdavia.com
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