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Author Topic: Please help me understand the basics of walls.  (Read 3250 times)
Tom Y
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« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2009, 01:48:47 PM »

Oregon, I also put 1/4 foam to have a thermal barrier. Each to their own. Just what I did, hope it helps.  Tom Y
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« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2009, 02:14:06 PM »

I think in the end you will very disappointed if you do not take the inside walls and ceiling down and insulate as much as possible.  Our first bus was not insulated.    Makes it very hard to cool in the summer and heat in the winter.  Time and money spent on insulation is the best time and money you can put into a coach.  Nothing will pay bigger dividends.

Good luck
Don 4107
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Don 4107 Eastern Washington
1975 MCI 5B
1966 GM PD 4107 for sale
1968 GMC Carpenter
Oregonconversion
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« Reply #17 on: March 05, 2009, 05:01:29 PM »

Well Don,

If I do take off those panels on the walls, how do I put them back on?

I am taking the insulation out of the ceiling and putting foam in there.



I think in the end you will very disappointed if you do not take the inside walls and ceiling down and insulate as much as possible.  Our first bus was not insulated.    Makes it very hard to cool in the summer and heat in the winter.  Time and money spent on insulation is the best time and money you can put into a coach.  Nothing will pay bigger dividends.

Good luck
Don 4107
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1977 MC8
8V92 HT740
Tom Y
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« Reply #18 on: March 05, 2009, 06:32:27 PM »

Oregon, Some do not put them back on. They figure the plywood will give the same support. I put mine back on, not to bad of job. I riveted them back in place, then put plywood over them. Hope this helps.  Tom Y 
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Tom Yaegle
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« Reply #19 on: March 05, 2009, 09:04:31 PM »

If you use phone books and spray foam your coach can be bullet proof.
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JackConrad
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« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2009, 05:15:44 AM »

     When we spray foamed our MC-8, we removed the interior panels.  We did not re-install them. My thought was that if I re-installed the aluminum panels, since they were attached to the metal framework which the outside skin was attached to, they would serve as a large radiator transmitting outside temperature to the inside. We replaced them with 1/2" plywood that was attached with urethane construction adhesive as well as screws (same diameter as OEM rivets) on the same spacing as the OEM rivets (new holes).  Over 42,000 miles and no problems. Jusy our way, YMMV.  Jack
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Don4107
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« Reply #21 on: March 06, 2009, 10:28:50 AM »

If you do plan to reuse the panels be sure to mark them before removal.  In your case with a MCI, I would  lean toward using plywood instead.  Gives a thermal break and an excellent surface to attach other stuff. 

Mine is insulated with cut to fit foam sheet insulation.  Takes some time but easy, safe, and effective.  Select foam sheets that add up to the the required thickness.  A few cans of low expansion foam gap sealer and you are in business.  Many people fir out the space for even more insulation.  My 4107 is short on overhead clearance so it is standard thickness.

Spray in foam is good too but not always available or affordable and must be done all at one time.  Forget something, more of a problem that cut and fit.

A lot of planning needs to happen before the insulation.  Wiring is a biggy. If possible plan an accessible wire run on each side of the coach to allow future service or mods.   A floor plan taking into account window locations, skylights/vents, heating cooling, bathroom location to holding tanks ect.  Lighting too.  I am a big proponent of mocking up everything in cardboard first but then wife says I am short on imagination anyway. Grin

Good luck
Don 4107
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Don 4107 Eastern Washington
1975 MCI 5B
1966 GM PD 4107 for sale
1968 GMC Carpenter
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« Reply #22 on: March 06, 2009, 10:09:15 PM »

A wall is just a floor that's been set on its side.

 Grin
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BG6
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« Reply #23 on: March 06, 2009, 10:19:12 PM »

If possible plan an accessible wire run on each side of the coach to allow future service or mods.

On my buddy's conversion, we used exposed conduit (like you use for track lighting).  It worked for him, so I'll do it on mine.  It's the fastest and easiest way to do it, there are no cutouts to worry about, and the layout can easily be changed later, if the power needs change.  It may not be as pretty as buried wiring, but I wouldn't want to try adding a couple of sockets in the living room of a coach with buried wiring.
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