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Author Topic: What is Your Favorite Tool?  (Read 9039 times)
Dallas
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« on: June 24, 2006, 04:44:51 AM »

This isn't a poll. I was just wondering what different people consider their favorite tools in the bus conversion process.
To start this out, I'd like to list some of my favorite and most useful tools. I've used a smiley instead of a star for a scale of 1 -10.

#5. Air operated Angle Grinder.. great for geting in those tight spots to clean up welds and make small changes in pieces of metal. I can also use it with 3M pads of different coarseness to clean gaskets and metal. Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley

#4. 2HP portable air compressor. I use it's 4 gallon tank in conjunction with an auxiliary 5 gallon tank. It has an oil filled crank case and will keep up with my 1/2" drive impact wrench. Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley

#3. Ingersol-Rand 1/2" drive impact wrench #2135PTI. Light (2.95 lbs.) powerfull (up to 700Ft. Lbs. of torque), it had no problems taking off the lug nuts on my bus that had been on there for years. I had even used a breaker bar and cheater pipe and couldn't budge them. Took 10 nuts off in 2 cycles of the compressor. It is also selectable for power and does light work well. Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley

#2. Kregs Pocket hole Jig. Great for building cabinet face frames, makes a perfect pocket screw hole everytime. Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley

#1. Drill Doctor Model XPK. This thing has saved me a ton of money in drill bits. Sharpens most types of bits, including masonary bits, allows changing the ange of the bit face to make a more or less agressive cut, and makes it possible to make split point bits out of standard bits. one chuck sharpens 3/32" to 1/2" bits and the larger chuck sharpens 1/2" up to 3/4" bits.  Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley

OK, now I've listed some of mine, let's hear about some of yours!

Dallas
« Last Edit: June 24, 2006, 06:08:49 AM by Dallas » Logged
mikeH8H-649
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« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2006, 05:22:46 AM »

Hi Dallas I had thought something like this would be good to let someone know the tools needed to do a conversion 1.sawsall 2.mig welder 3.BUD LIGHT 4.14'' cot off saw 5.drill doctor(saves lots of money)more bud light 6.air riveter(must have when doing 3,000+ rivets 7.information from Mak and bno boards 8.A better half when she is as much into it as you are 9.jim beam(good at the end of the work day to relax) 10.41/2 " elect grinder with lots of discs 11.to own stock in home depot or lowes would be nice,to name everything would be a long list but my best by far is # 8 Kathy             Mike
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Frank @ TX
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« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2006, 05:44:11 AM »

Mine is a Multi meter with a clamp on AC and DC amp meter.
It's just great.
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« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2006, 05:54:32 AM »

My vote would be for the cordless drill for #1, the other #1 would be the Drill Doctor, one of the better investments I've made!!
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« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2006, 06:10:02 AM »

There are so many....For chassis work, the torch is priceless.  For the rest of the conversion, I'd say that a good quality cordless drill is pretty much a neccessity.
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belfert
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« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2006, 06:21:27 AM »

My favorite tool so far has been my Makita 18 volt cordless impact driver for 1/4" hex bits.  Much lighter than a cordless drill for removing hundreds of screws to strip my interior.  I have a 5 gallon bucket with two to three inches of screws in the bottom!

My second favorite tool has been my sawzall.  This has been invaluable for sawing up the all fiberglass bathroom and luggage racks in my Diina bus.

Brian Elfert
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Ace
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« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2006, 06:38:09 AM »

Interior work  like my Dewalt 12v (cheap) cordless drill found at a pawn shop 6 years ago for 20 bucks that has survived 3 busses and still going with only ONE battery. I also like the good ole' caulking gun and my trusty carpet knife! I like my T sqaure too but if you look closely you might find some areas where it wasn't used so take that one off! My sears craftsman table saw was a god send and my jig saw that was handed down from who knows where. There just too many tools that I tried in the interior. The exterior I like my miller maxstar welder and a friends plasma cutter. Don't forget the local food store for the stocking of Corona's! SmileySmileySmileySmileySmileySmileySmileySmileySmileySmileySmiley

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TomC
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« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2006, 07:21:36 AM »

I did the whole conversion with corded elec hand tools only that included-Makita 3/8" double reduction 300rpm hand drill (size of regular hand drill)that was a beast-broke many a drill bit, but was needed to drill into the metal of many hundreds of holes for anchoring; 2-regular speed drill; Makita electronic speed control hand jig saw-would keep exact rpm no matter how much pressure-very slow for metal cutting to very fast. Hardest part was finding good saw blades-which I found Bosch to be the best; Electronic variable speed grinder/sander/wire brush; two 7 1/4" elec hand saws-one with combo blade with tungsten tips and other with very fine finish blade; router; hand elec end planer; elec miter box; riveter; and various jigs and clamps.
Also have a 2hp portable compressor that mostly used a 3/8" air ratchet; also 1/2" impact; and the best-air powered grease gun with 18" hose-makes greasing so much easier than a hand gun.
What I didn't have because my room was limited but would have next time is a table saw for sure; drill press; 12" wide surface planer; end table planer; mortiser; grinder with belt sander; shaper (table router).  Maybe a lathe to make your own wood turnings and to machine parts.  If I really had the room, a metal vertical combo mill.  Good Luck, TomC

Question- When I did my conversion in the mid 90's they did have cordless, but now the selection is unbelieveable.  What voltage would you use?  My instinct says 12v to be able to charge in the bus-but not real important.  Good Luck, TomC

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« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2006, 07:41:54 AM »

 Plasma Cutter.  MY current conversion is taking probably a month less due to it, than my last one without it.
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« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2006, 07:58:35 AM »

1) computer, desktop, internet access

2) imapct gun, 12v, Makita, hex

3) multitool, Victornox, Swiss army leatherman type

4) vaccum, shop, Fien

5) hook tool, cotter key remover,Wilde

6) camera, digital

7) caulking gun, Lindsey

Cool work lights, various brands and types

9) compressor

10) chip brush

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Dallas
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« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2006, 08:27:51 AM »

Tom,
My two favorite are the 14.4V Milwaukee, I've gone through 3 batteries on it in 5 years. I think it's variable from 600 to 3500RPM, 1/2" drive and lasts for a long time.
I also have a 18V Dewalt 1/2" drive that has more torque, but is slower and eats batteries at an excessive rate. A little more than one battery (XR2) every 9 months.
I follow the Mfg's directions, and never leave the batteries in the charger past the charge time. Except for the Dewalt that says it has a 'tuneup' feature that doesn't seem to really do anything. I always know when the Dewalt batteries are dieing because the charge time will drop drastically.
I also have a 15 year old 12V Dewalt with the old style battery and it will outlast the Milwaukee and the 18V Dewalt. It's just not as strong or as variable. Oh, and I'm still working on only the second battery it ever had. The charger for it died years ago so I use the new one I got with the 18V and a set of jumpers. It still takes one hour to charge and still works well.
By the way, B&D Firestorm batteries will work in the Dewalt drills, but not vice-versa for FireStorm without grinding edges. Firestorm isn't as strong, but is a lot cheaper for a replacement battery.
Gotta Stop now, I have a HUGE 6 Week old girl Kitten that just challenging the mouse for dominion of the mouse pad.
she' just came into my life 13 minutes ago and has made herself at home.
Good thing Our 15Lb Kitty boy hasn't seen her yet. I hope he doesn't eat her.

Dallas
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« Reply #11 on: June 24, 2006, 08:45:13 AM »

Seems the cordless drill (variable speed) is top dog.  Gets my vote too.  However,  I'm perplexed that nobody has mentioned the old aviators favorite ... DUCT TAPE.  Come on guys, fess up ... I know you use it.
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« Reply #12 on: June 24, 2006, 09:01:39 AM »

 Grin Cool Roll Eyes I love all my tools, but I guess since you wanna know which one we love the most I'll have to say my SHOP KEY! It lets us get inside to use all the other tools and the second favoite which is the PIT !!! Gotta love that PIT!!! Oh how much easier life has been since getting it!  Cool Shocked Grin BK
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« Reply #13 on: June 24, 2006, 09:43:10 AM »

Ahhhh!  So many tools, so little time!

I think my absolute favorite would be the pouch on my belt.

It has gotten me out of so many jams!

Kinda like [Mcgiver]

It has a Buck knife,Brinkman flash lite, Two way screwdriver, and a Snap on mini Pliers with a side cutter!

I can almost do anything with theese Tools........

Nick-
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« Reply #14 on: June 24, 2006, 12:04:57 PM »

BOTTLE OPENER !!!!
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