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Author Topic: i discovered a 120v plug in my engine....someone said its used to preheat it?  (Read 3381 times)
ilyafish
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« on: January 09, 2009, 09:26:27 PM »

hey guys,


so today i found a 120v plug in the engine compartment coming out somewhere by the engine (it was dark outside) and its about dead smack in the middle of the engine about neck level or so.  not sure if this is stock or if someone put it on afterwards, but i was told by the previous owner when i talked to him that it is to preheat the engine....is this true/is this stock/if not what is it?

thanks guys!
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plyonsMC9
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« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2009, 09:39:11 PM »

We have an '83 MC9 with the 120 volt plug.  A 120v outlet is available at the rear of the bus to plug in an a/c power supply.  I believe this was used at the bus stations to pre-heat the engine.  You can probably trace the wire to a "plug" where it enters the engine block. This should be the heating element.

In our case, this no longer works - and I'm hoping it is a simple repair.  I've heard these are great for cold weather.  If you live in the cold weather (like we do) you know how hard it can be to start these engines when the temps are waaaaaaaay  below freezing.

Kind Regards, Phil
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Northern Arizona / 1983 - MC9
ilyafish
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« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2009, 10:02:28 PM »

yup....experienced that today  Roll Eyes

now is there any method of testing if mine still works or not?  also, what amount of time from when plugged in to where its warmed up am i looking at?
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Own: 1981 MCI MC9 w/
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« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2009, 10:13:27 PM »

Don't be like a friend of mine that plugged his up and looked at the meter on the side of the house, the bearings were about to smoke! Grin
If it is a block heater as most folks call them, they will burn a lot of electricity.
Jack
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Jack Hart, CDS
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2009, 12:14:10 AM »

You're very lucky, you have a hybrid coach!

They are very rare!

Plug it in for a few hours and you should be able to tool around town on a single charge!

I'll bet it's so quiet it's freaky!

 Tongue

Jay
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2009, 01:41:33 AM »

Block heaters work great as there was one on mine and I used it in freezing weather to keep the engine warm. draws about the same as an elextric heater.Jerry
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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2009, 03:33:59 AM »

To tell if its working, plug it in.  You can often hear them start to "sing" shortly after they are plugged in.  If not, put your hand on the block close to the plug and it should start to feel warm.  Its going to be a 1000 or 1200 watt element - a watt is a watt so about the same as a cube heater.
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« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2009, 03:49:31 AM »

It is ten degrees here and I am running mine now to preheat the engine for a trip in the morning, they preheat the water in the engine and cooling system and are very effective. I installed mine years ago for Utah weather, I have also used my generator in the boonies for the preheat.
They are generally installed in one head of the engine, are not expensive, and available at NAPA stores.>>>Dan
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luvrbus
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« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2009, 04:44:12 AM »

if the engine is a V71 series most on the right head, on 82 series it will be on the right lower corner of the block looking from the front of the engine on both      good luck
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cody
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« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2009, 06:09:58 AM »

For anyone that lives in the colder areas of the country, that plug certainly comes in handy, just by plugging it in for an hour or so makes it easier to start without taking down your batteries or damaging your starter, picture filling your crank case with mollases and then putting the engine block in a deep freeze for a while then use a hand crank to turn it over, much easier to warm it up first and less wear and tear on the engine, the meter cost is minimal unless you choose to leave it plugged in all the time in the winter.
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VanTare
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« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2009, 06:29:31 AM »

I have a fork lift with a Detroit Diesel in it and it has glow plugs for cold weather starting.   

David
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Dreamscape
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« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2009, 07:11:33 AM »

At least you have a 120v plug in the engine bay! Tha's on my list of things to do! Wink Now where'd I put that list?  Roll Eyes

Paul
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« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2009, 07:33:11 AM »

With my memory, I would also include a timer switch.
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« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2009, 12:38:05 PM »

With my memory, I would also include a timer switch.

Ditto! Wink
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« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2009, 12:44:33 PM »

We have a similar plug. And ours works Grin Cheesy Grin!!! It does a fine job of heating the engine, if we have been plugged in for a while.

God bless,

John
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« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2009, 01:04:37 PM »

Im moveing to Montana, i will need Block Heaters for my Vovlo, Kia, Wife, 4 dogs and me.. Huh i dont thimk im going to like this  Undecided
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cody
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« Reply #16 on: January 10, 2009, 02:31:11 PM »

I got used to it after a while but my dog really hasn't adjusted to the block heater yet.
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Chopper Scott
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« Reply #17 on: January 10, 2009, 04:22:53 PM »

Just really check that cord to the block heater out very good. I once lost a building and contents plus the vehicle that was plugged into a block heater. In fact here in farm country many fires seem to occur due to block heaters starting fires. The cord on my 8v71 was pretty bad so I cut it off and if need be will replace the whole unit if I ever do any winter excursions. Later
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« Reply #18 on: January 10, 2009, 08:39:43 PM »

Yes, check the length of the electric cord for cracked insulation and all the usual electrical wire safety stuff. No broken ground pins...

Think what might happen if the cord is chafed through against the coach body, and the ground pin is snapped off the plug....

Replacement cords may be readily purchased, in many lengths, that will just plug in to the heater.

Block heaters are a lovely thing and another option available for warming the engine to prepare it for starting, providing a load for your generator, bragging rights at a bus rally, and on and on...

plug it in for as long as it takes to get the block warm, and no more, to save electricity.

happy coaching!
buswarrior

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Oregonconversion
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« Reply #19 on: December 07, 2011, 09:32:31 AM »

Should I use my block heater at night when it gets down to 28F or so? I am talking about when the bus is just parked for storage.
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« Reply #20 on: December 07, 2011, 09:36:04 AM »

Should I use my block heater at night when it gets down to 28F or so? I am talking about when the bus is just parked for storage.

No not just for storage, just if your gonna be starting it.
Grin  BK  Grin
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« Reply #21 on: December 08, 2011, 06:15:30 AM »

Helps keep the bedroom warm too! I put a switch in the bedroom to turn it on so I xan start warming the engine without going outside.
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« Reply #22 on: December 08, 2011, 06:16:09 AM »

I have noticed that below 60deg I can tell a difference in the bus starting.

I have my block heater connected to my shore power/generator for the winter.
If I'm going to be connected to shore or have the generator running for long periods I disconnect the block heater.

I just plug in my shore power about 2 hours before I have to leave for a gig and the block is warmed and also the interior of the bus because of the space heater I have plugged in.
I also start the generator about an hour before leaving the gig to warm up the bus and engine.


.
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« Reply #23 on: December 08, 2011, 06:38:19 AM »

On my big rig, I had an Onan 6.5 Emerald Commercial gasoline generator (the compact Diesel gensets weren't made yet).  Whenever the generator was running, the block heater was also-no matter the temperature outside.  It created a constant 1500 watt load that kept it from carboning up.  Hence in the 12,000 hours that it lived, never had to have the cylinder heads off for de-carboning.  Onan didn't believe me on that one-that no carboning and the unit lasted 12,000 hours.  Amazing what good maintenance will do.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
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« Reply #24 on: December 08, 2011, 06:39:06 AM »

I don't see one on my engine. Would somebody with a 6V92TA be kind enough to tunnel out to your bus through the 10 feet of snow and post a picture of this?

How expensive is it to purchase? How difficult to install?

Thanks in advance!
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Dr. Steve, San Juan del Río, Querétaro, Mexico, North America, Planet Earth, Milky Way.
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« Reply #25 on: December 08, 2011, 06:54:52 AM »

Quite the thread resurrection! Ours has a stock block heater. Works wonders. Below 40 and coach not plugged in? No starty. Plugged in for a few hours? Starty.
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Scott & Heather
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« Reply #26 on: December 08, 2011, 09:19:01 AM »

Dr. Steve, you might not have one. They were not installed on every engine. Look in the end of the block just under the head for a chord coming out. There were a few different places they put them, but that is the one I know of. (I think the most common too)
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