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Author Topic: NEW HERE and a question or two!  (Read 6167 times)
pvcces
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« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2009, 10:05:10 PM »

Jamie, welcome!

These 4106s do not have convenient square tube to fasten to, but if you stop at RJs and look at his bus, I think that he could show you some of the inside skin construction.

I would think that a bus could be one of your least expensinve ways to travel with a big family. Good luck with your find.

Tom Caffrey
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Tom Caffrey PD4106-2576
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Ketchikan, Alaska
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« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2009, 06:37:48 AM »

Jamie, I'm back in Dallas, and I'm available Friday.  We're just north of Dallas.  On your map, it'll be near the intersection of I-35E and the 190 Toll Road, the George Bush Turnpike.

On our update of the mid-1970's conversion, we started at the front of the coach and we're working our way back.  We haven't taken out the bunks yet - so you may get some ideas.  With a little notice, there's another bus fan in the area - a retired GM field engineer - who may be available to take a look at your 4106 if you're interested.  If you think it likely that you'll come through this way, let me know and I'll give him a "heads up."     

An earlier point mentioned the engine cover, which was under the original 5 rear seats (across the back of the bus, 5 with no lav, 3 with lav if I recall correctly.

There is an access panel in the center of this "bench", and you will want to be sure to keep this available.  It's mainly for access to the starter.

Arthur
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Arthur Gaudet    Carrollton (Dallas area) Texas 
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NewbeeMC9
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« Reply #17 on: January 14, 2009, 01:52:20 PM »

If you worked i in to a Side aisle,  You could put six bunks in at an Angle with a divider between them, then have cabinets at the ends where angle form spaces.  Also in the navy, the mattress box was hinged at the top along the wall and would open up to storage underneath in a similar size box.  There was a tether and hook to hold it open.  Amazing how much stuff you can get in there.  There was another smaller drop down tray from the ceiling of the rack and a lockable foot box.  the was fan and reading light at the head, some people put players and small screens in in the later years.

Welcome and good luck
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« Reply #18 on: January 28, 2009, 04:46:27 AM »

Well, here goes a rather long and sordid update.  We picked up our bus and had relatively few issues the first 10 miles but then we started overheating.  We discovered (the hard way) that Detroits like to be pushed hard and wound out so once Doug got that *kind of* figured out, the overheating was less frequent.  We stayed in San Angelo, TX for 5 days and had a great time and then we had to leave and the trouble started.  We were overheating almnost every ten miles from  San Angelo to El Paso and Doug discovered that the hoky cooling fans (somebody ripped out the original cooling system.....to our chagrin) wefre not running or barely running so we made the call to stay in a park in El Paso and try to get the cooling working better.  Doug had to drain the radiator to replace the hoky fans with newer, but still equally hoky, cooling fans (MacGyver comes to mind at this point) but in doing so, here is what he encountered.  He said he drained about 6 (maybe 7) gallons of fluid out of the radiator to get the hoses off but once he got it all back together, he could only add about 4.5 gallons back in.  He has spoken to John Vickers, RJ and Arthur (all salt of the earth guys I might add), and John and RJ tried to walk him through bleeding the system, but he could not find any pet cocks to drain air from and all oof the original heating in the front of the bus is missing and capped off so what was suggested was to let her idle on high for a while and see if she would bleed the air out herself, but that has proven fruitless.  She doesn't overheat when just sitting idle but the fear is that she will once we start running her.  Does anyone know of a sure fire way to bleed the air out without dismantling anything or causing Doug too many more banged knuckles, gash marks on his head or wild expletive rants?  By the way, we have the maintenance manual, operators manual and parts manual on CD that came with the bus (from the Coach Information Network) and Doug has read them thoroughly but the procedures they describe for bleeding air out seem not usable since the heater core up front is non-functional and most of the stuff the maintenance manual describes is missing on our coach.  If anyone has any suggestions or just wants to talk to Doug and give him advice, words of encouragement or whatever, his cell phone number is 541-324-9772 and his email address is doug@thecomputerpros.net (he has a BlackBerry so he gets email pretty readily).

P.S.  Our plan is we are leaving El Paso this morning and trying to get to the Tucson area today, God willing. (going through Las Cruces, Deming, Lordsburg,etc. on I-10)

Thanks for any help or suggestions.

Jamie
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John316
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« Reply #19 on: January 28, 2009, 06:43:56 AM »

Jamie,

First off, I want to let you know that I am sorry. Somehow, I think most of the good folks here on the board knew that something along these lines would happen. It can be very tough getting an old bus up and running in order to be able to transport it that many miles back to your house.

I don't have any suggestions for how to help you cooling issues, since our bus is much newer, and a completely different make. I do know, however, that if you overheat and end up hurting your engine, you are in for some serious bucks (just ask BoboftheNorth Wink). It sounds like you have a really long trip in front of you.

Anyways, I will be praying that you get home safely.

God bless,

John
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John316
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« Reply #20 on: January 28, 2009, 07:04:59 AM »

Jamie,

One other thing. Have you all considered using a mechanic? We might be able to find you one.

Guys, Do you all know of any mobile mechanics, or shops, along their route? It could be a little tough finding somebody that will work on their bus...I am just thinking out loud. Anybody???

God bless,

John
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MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
Len Silva
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« Reply #21 on: January 28, 2009, 07:16:11 AM »

1. DON'T LET IT OVERHEAT!!!!!

2. There should be shut off valves on the left firewall of the engine compartment to close off the front heaters.  Make sure they are closed.  I can't tell you how to bleed it except to drive it and stop frequently to add coolant as it will accept it.

3.  See # 1

4.  Get it to where you can work on it and replace the cooling fan (and everything else there) with the original.  None of the electric fan options will work for you.  The original cooling system was very well designed.

5.  Don't let it overheat.

6.  Busted knuckles, bleeding and expletive rants are a normal part of owning a bus.

7.  Best of luck to you
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« Reply #22 on: January 28, 2009, 07:31:09 AM »

I would close the valves/lines  (2) to the front of the bus (which would have been a good idea working on the cooling system anyway).  With a bright  light find the pet cocks etc for the cooling system around the engine and burp this baby.  You're doing a good job staying on top of the overheating system as far as watching the temps and that is a major plus.  You mention that the original fan system is gone and that some sort of mcgiver system is there.  Does this mean the original fluid couple driven fan is gone and there are just electric fans trying to cool the rad?  If so, from everything I have heard this will not work.  I know that on a 6-71 the fan assembly is an expensive little rig and also prone to failure, I know less about the 8V-71 but if the fan hub is engine mounted it may fall into the same category.  Oh yeah and BTW Doug should learn how to enjoy the pain 'cause the bashed knuckles and heads are just beginning Smiley
  we're all pulling for you, stay strong and remember that learning curve is pretty steep in the beginning.
p.s. let us know if this thing is just being cooled with electric fans as this is pertinent as to whether you want to risk keeping this/investing in it etc  as overheating is probably in it's past.
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John316
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« Reply #23 on: January 28, 2009, 07:42:21 AM »

Jamie,

I just read your post again. If I was in your place, I would do somewhat like Len said. First off, DO NOT LET IT OVERHEAT. That said, I would add as much as I could, and then run the engine for a while (making sure that it DOES NOT OVERHEAT). I would then rev the engine pretty good, and see if the air would work its way out. Otherwise I would find a fitting that is towards the top, and then loosen the hose clamp to see if I could get that to work instead of a drain cock. I am not able to help much since I am not as familiar with your model.

To summarize, I would let it sit and run the engine (again paying very close attention to the temp and DO NOT LET IT OVERHEAT). If that was doing fine, then I would rev the engine pretty well. That might help, and if it doesn't then I would resort to loosening a hose clamp or to, to try to let it gasp the air out...

God bless,

John  

ZubZub and I crossed posts. He has really good advice. And I can detect a lot of experience packed into his post Grin Grin Grin. That first learning curve, like he mentioned, is going to be really tough, but keep on working at it, and you will get it eventually. 
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #24 on: January 28, 2009, 08:01:21 AM »

Do you have a temp gauge on the dash and one in the engine compartment? Do they read the same or close to it? It could be your dash gauge is off and it is telling you that it is hotter than it really is.  If you don't have the 2nd gauge you might want to go to an auto parts store and get a laser/infared temperature gun and take readings on the radiators and hoses and compare that to your gauge and see if they are the same.
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« Reply #25 on: January 28, 2009, 08:04:00 AM »

  PS. It might be that you have a thermostat problem.......
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Tom Y
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« Reply #26 on: January 28, 2009, 08:38:18 AM »

I would not run it!!! There is probally 1 side of the engine (Head area) without water. I know someone with a GM that ruined their motor like that. Sorry I do not know how to get the air out.  Tom Y
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Tom Yaegle
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« Reply #27 on: January 28, 2009, 08:42:02 AM »

Okay Tom. I will concede to you. That is why I was just saying what I would do. Still though, Doug has some coolant in there...

God bless,

John
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Barn Owl
Roanoke, VA
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« Reply #28 on: January 28, 2009, 03:35:52 PM »

I don't have time to add to this discussion because I am at work, but everyone posting about shutting off the coolant valves to the front needs to always mention in you post to make sure the bus is properly blocked and secured before getting under it. Possibly we need to make an easily inserted link that could be referenced to with easy generic instructions so we don't need to retype it everytime. We don't know how much any given reader knows about air suspension and how dangerous it can be. Even if the poster already knows the hazards there could be future readers that read this from the archives that don't. If I had time right now I would but would someone please add this warning somewhere. Some don't know that you just don't throw the blocks under it just anywhere.

Thanks,

Barn Owl
« Last Edit: January 28, 2009, 03:38:15 PM by Barn Owl » Logged

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« Reply #29 on: January 28, 2009, 04:27:21 PM »

Another note, I think the side that got air locked was the lower of the 2. Not tring to disagree or scare.  Tom Y
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Tom Yaegle
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