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Author Topic: The best way to monitor the engine and compartment.  (Read 5080 times)
johns4104s
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« on: January 20, 2009, 12:21:12 PM »

Over the past 25years I have had three engine and engine compartment problems.1) Fire due to the 4104 hand beak being left on the drive shaft. 2) Fan hub letting loose and fan going though the radiator and 3) Two blown cylinder head gaskets ( 15 years between the two).
I sure would like to know what all is available out there that I can install to protect my 8V92T investment?  whats he has done. It is not fun being on the side of the road awaiting a wrecker. When there maybe several things I might do to avoid this .
I just read that Jack may be able to share.

John
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HB of CJ
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« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2009, 01:07:02 PM »

I know my hearing is really going South and possibly I couldn't even HEAR a major disaster happening.  About the only thing relatable from personal experience with a Bus Conversion or school bus was both fan belts busting at once.  Happened a long time ago.

Just a dull, loud THUD; felt as much as heard.  Hauling kids to school.  About 10 of them looked up at me as if to say, "What was THAT?"  That was it.  But, it was enough that I safely stopped, opened the mill hatches (Crown Supercoach) and saw both belts were gone.

Could gadgets be installed that monitor (sp?) noise?  How about smoke or steam?  We already have high/low oil, water, volts and temp lights and alarms.  How about a camera looking at the mill?  Suppose it depends upon how much one wants to know.  HB of CJ 
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Ednj
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« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2009, 01:09:16 PM »

Ross had a camera in the engine compartment and could watch everything on his monitor on the dash.
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MCI-9
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VanTare
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« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2009, 01:11:35 PM »

There are a lot of monitoring systems for the aircraft and marine industry that will work on a bus.One Newell I owned used a aircraft system on a 8v92.I would think dual temperature gauges, oil temperature,and a dual pryometer along with oil pressure gauge would tell all that you need for the engine and one of the RV fire systems for the compartment. I know for sure the pryometers work I broke a manifold  and the temperature dropped on that side warning me of some type problem and there was they are also good for monitoring the performance of the engine if a injector goes bad that side will be cooler.    


David
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JackConrad
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« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2009, 02:15:09 PM »

    We have dual water temperature gauges (one in each cylinder head), oil temperature, transmission temperature, oil pressure, fuel pressure, pyrometer, fuel level, 28 volt voltmeter, 12 voltmeter, air pressure, brake application pressure, tachometer, speedometer and Jim shepherds Fire detection/suppression system (this system gives me a digital readout of ambient air temp in the engine compartment, generator compartment, at the inverter, the rear bay [water tanks] and the outside air temp under the front bumper [potential icing conditions]) as well as our PressurePro tire pressure monitoring system. We also have a microphone in our rear camera that picks up noises from the engine compartment. 
    In the engine compartment, we have mechanical water temperature, oil pressure and fuel pressure gauges.
     I feel the more I can monitor, the better chance I have of seeing a minor problem before it becomes a major problem.  Jack
« Last Edit: January 20, 2009, 03:11:01 PM by JackConrad » Logged

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RTS/Daytona
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Pete RTS/Daytona ->'89 TMC 35' 102" 6V92TA 4:10


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« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2009, 02:38:38 PM »

I've had one of these on EVERY RV (including my current RTS) over the last 10 years.

http://www.digi-panel.com/digidevicesweb/photo.htm

I call it my "marriage keeper" - My wife also drove the RVs & sometimes drives the RTS Bus.

I allways felt that she never looked at the gauges as often I did - With the digi-panel - I can go to sleep on the couch knowing that if he have
a major problem the ALARMS / Cautions will sound.

My wife was a FEDEX driver for 20 years - so forget about telling HER ANYTHING about driving (she usually right about that subject - at least)

Pete RTS/Daytona

They have a Diesel model that brings the engine temp limits for that of a D/D engine

« Last Edit: January 20, 2009, 03:19:53 PM by RTS/Daytona » Logged

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johns4104s
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« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2009, 02:45:35 PM »

Pete,

The site you posted was a Yahoo photo site, can you please re post the correct one.

John
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gus
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« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2009, 02:55:40 PM »

Jack,

You definitely need a flight engineer station to monitor all those gages!!
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RTS/Daytona
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« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2009, 03:20:44 PM »

DIGI PANEL URL has been corrected in the post

or see--> http://www.digi-panel.com/digidevicesweb/photo.htm

here's how mine is mounted
« Last Edit: January 20, 2009, 03:28:23 PM by RTS/Daytona » Logged

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Van
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« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2009, 03:44:25 PM »

There ya go Pete,thats more along the lines of what I had in mind,even the most vigilant gauge watcher is glad to have an extra measure of coverage ,thats a nice system you have.Here's another nice system one I think I will look into.

http://www.rvsafetysystems.com/
« Last Edit: January 20, 2009, 03:48:22 PM by THE BIKE WHISPERER » Logged

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« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2009, 08:41:34 PM »

Gentlemen,

Some outstanding instrumentation and gadgetry!  I've once again found more toys I "must" have.   Wink

Actually I've been mulling those questions around myself.  I don't like the way my bus' dash is laid out and was plotting reorganizing and adding some more gauges.

WOOT!
« Last Edit: January 20, 2009, 08:45:24 PM by MattC » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2009, 08:52:33 PM »

Jack and Van, thanks for mentioning our system.

I have an air clutch on my radiator fan (controlled by me with a switch on the dash).  I leave the fan off for warm up, or shut it off if I am in a dusty area (Quartzsite for example  Smiley).  Our system has an owner settable first level "early warning" alarm.  I have mine set for 200 degrees for the engine compartment.  If I forget to turn on the fan once I am on the road, the early warning alarm goes off before the engine gets to 205 (not very high for a Series 60).  

I think Jack caught a cooling problem with his generator with the same set-up.

I do not want to suggest that the system will "detect" major engine problems before they occur (was not designed for that purpose), but it is one more piece of information and has helped me avoid a "stupid operator" caused problem (several times - slow learner?  Roll Eyes).

Jim
« Last Edit: January 20, 2009, 09:09:18 PM by rv_safetyman » Logged

Jim Shepherd
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JackConrad
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« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2009, 05:47:46 AM »

I think Jack caught a cooling problem with his generator with the same set-up.
Jim

    Yes we did. Our generator compartment relies on 3 bilge blowers for cooling air (radiator is remotely mounted outside the compartment). When one of the fans failed, and caused the other 2 to loose power, the air temp in the compartment started climbing. We had the low alarm set at 120 degrees (PowerTech recommends a maximum air temp at generator head of 120 degrees). When the compartment temp reached 120 the alarm sounded and we immediately shutdown the generator and stopped to see what happened. Fortuanately, we were only about 1 hour from home, so we proeceded home before making repairs.  No damage was done to the generator.Jack
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johns4104s
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« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2009, 05:52:08 AM »

Pete/RTS,

Looks great and not expensive, So this system is above and beyond all your factory gauges? I will be seriously looking at installing one on my 9.

Thanks

John
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VanTare
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« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2009, 06:13:40 AM »

An inexpensive way to protect you mechanical engine is the Murphy gauges they have been around for years in commercial use 

David
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