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Author Topic: Just say Howdy  (Read 5766 times)
Jeremy
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« Reply #15 on: January 28, 2009, 08:44:10 AM »

Everything sounds very similar to the UK in terms of how drivers communicate with each other, which is I guess what you would expect. As an aside, we have a breakdown-assistance organisation here called the AA (http://www.theaa.com/) which was apparently nothing to do with breakdowns originally - instead it was network of men who stood about in areas where police speed traps commonly operated, and if the AA man saw an AA badge on the grille of an approaching car he would warn the car if the speed trap was in operation. Not surprisingly this activity was soon outlawed, so the AA turned itself into a network of mechanics instead.

The original AA men often had their own huts at the side of the road, which you still occasionally see in country locations, the huts invariably being carefully restored and maintained by local heritage enthusiasts:




Jeremy
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Lin
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« Reply #16 on: January 28, 2009, 11:15:43 AM »

Interesting, AA is also very popular in the US.
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rusty
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« Reply #17 on: January 28, 2009, 12:57:03 PM »

Now that's funny Grin Grin. Thank You for making my day.

Laugh at lest once a day Wayne
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busshawg
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« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2009, 09:58:42 AM »

I find it almost disturbing how people have let the addressing of one another slip by the way side. I have been a part of the biking community for a long time. It used to be that everyone would wave when meeting each other. No a days it just seem sto have slipped away. It seems like it is a status thing and if I were to maybe trade my old harley off on a new one they might wave again? Doesn't mean a hill of beans to me really if that is the case, however a wave or addressing one another is a sign of respect and I will keep flashing my lights and waving.
 However I'm with you BUSNUT104, the high beams at night makes my eyes bleed, make a person feel like installing some big @$# spot lights pointing backwards to say thanks $@@**, Obviously these guys don't work hard enough to have tired eyes I guess.

Have Fun
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Have Fun!!
Grant
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« Reply #19 on: January 29, 2009, 10:06:31 AM »

It has been a few years since I read the CDL manual (NJ) but I believe it is illegal to use lights to signal another driver. May be the reason we do not recieve more lites in return.

I happen to believe a subtle marker lite blink is fine, but do not do more.

I do wave to most all conversions, noting the 5's.....

Have a great day.
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« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2009, 10:07:24 AM »

We live on a dirt road in Joshua Tree, CA.  As you drive in and out to the highway about a mile away, everyone waves at each other as they pass.  Once you hit the pavement though, it's a different story.  Maybe its because your going so slow on the dirt road that there is time to acknowledge each other.  This goes for everyone but my wife, who runs the dirt road at 50 mph and thinks its a real kick.
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bobsw
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« Reply #21 on: January 29, 2009, 10:23:05 AM »

When I see another conversion I give a wave and try to raise them on the CB. I only get about a one in ten responce but it is always fun to chat with other busnuts.
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chargePlus
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« Reply #22 on: January 29, 2009, 06:19:56 PM »

I have been a part of the biking community for a long time. It used to be that everyone would wave when meeting each other. No a days it just seem sto have slipped away.

When I rode my Honda Nighthawk (back in the mid 80s), I found that the *only* riders who didn't wave to me were the Harley riders. I figured it wasn't because they weren't friendly, they just didn't approve of my ride. OK, that's cool.

I experienced the waves from people I didn't know several times before I caught on and started returning or initiating the greeting. I have also waved or given a "thumbs up" to particularly interesting motorcycles, and cars. The smiles are worth it.

- John

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fraser8
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« Reply #23 on: January 29, 2009, 06:36:50 PM »

On our country road we always wave when you pass a vehicle, the city boys usually don't wave back but that's the way it is. When I drove truck back in the late 60's the 5 ton I drove had a button on the dash that looked like an old style starter button, it was marked "Blink Mark" which gave the marker lights a blink. It worked good and made me feel like a real trucker, I was only 18 then.
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Fraser Field
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JohnEd
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« Reply #24 on: January 29, 2009, 07:12:17 PM »

In 66 I returned from Europe with a brand new VW Variant station baby wagon.  Great little car but not much power.  I left Pittsburgh, Pa. for my first cross country drive in the afternoon.  I had precious little experience with highway driving, let alone highway etiquette.  Into West Virginia and going down hill on a twisty two lane road without any shoulder I drew up behind a semi.  He was going fast enuf and was obviously in a down hill gear.  I wanted to pass and took a peek and a car was coming.  Repeated that a few times and then I saw clear road.  Problem was that a turn was approaching.  I down shifted and the mighty 80HP engine roared.  Off I went into the left lane and was accelerating about even with the cab and I noticed lights on the mountain twilight lit bank of the turn in front of me.  As if by magic a car materialized in front of me going faster that all hell.  He just flashed around that curve and stared me in my wide eyes and he didn't even blink.  It was sure as heck too late for me to stop and he wasn't even trying to slow.  Just as were to hit and my sudden death by Buick was about to happen, my car filled with this mysterious flashing white light.  It happened faster than I could think of Divine intervention but at that moment I wrenched the wheel over thinking that smearing myself cross the front of the semi was preferable to embedding my rear bumper in the grille of the Buick.  Well, I made it and left a big scratch across my rear window rubbing against that semi's front bumper. (that's a joke, but not much)  My rear view was filled with semi bumper and he had every light on that rig on hi beam.  Had i been a half second slower I would not have made it over in time and I think the flash started me moving.  Thank you mister trucker....thank you.  I haven't forgotten you.

In Oregon we flash you back in, day or night.  Years ago I saw headlight turned off to invite the other back in but I haven't seen that in a while or at least I haven't noticed it.  The flash at night lights up the roadway and markers in front of the passing truck so gets a positive signal.  Not that i haven't led a sheltered life and should not have the last word.

About that left turn signal:  I have always seen a left turn signal as a warning to NOT PASS.  It has proved true for me over the years.  A 'blink" meant it was safe to pass.  Am I completely wrong on this?  Truckers please comment.  Come Back!

Thanks and always signal and greet...especially two quick flashes,

John
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Barn Owl
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« Reply #25 on: January 29, 2009, 10:07:28 PM »

By the time I get over my excitement and find the switch, they have already reached their destination!
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busshawg
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« Reply #26 on: January 30, 2009, 07:56:28 AM »

Quote from: busshawg on January 29, 2009, 10:58:42 AM
I have been a part of the biking community for a long time. It used to be that everyone would wave when meeting each other. No a days it just seem sto have slipped away.

Quote from Chargeplus: When I rode my Honda Nighthawk (back in the mid 80s), I found that the *only* riders who didn't wave to me were the Harley riders. I figured it wasn't because they weren't friendly, they just didn't approve of my ride. OK, that's cool.

ha ha , maybe that what my problem is, I just wave at everybody, live and let live. I always tell my wife that I just so happy I have to sit on both my hands to keep from waving at everybody.

Grant
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Have Fun!!
Grant
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« Reply #27 on: February 05, 2009, 02:51:43 PM »


"ha ha , maybe that what my problem is, I just wave at everybody, live and let live. I always tell my wife that I just so happy I have to sit on both my hands to keep from waving at everybody.

Grant
[/quote]

Grant, That's just plain cute Grin
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buswarrior
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« Reply #28 on: February 06, 2009, 03:24:38 PM »

If the vehicle is equipped with daytime running lights, the driver can't turn the headlights off.

So, a flash of the high beams is all we've got, not the best when there's only a single bulb both sides, hard to tell if it was a flash of a bump in the road, sometimes.

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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