Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
November 22, 2014, 06:14:52 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: The dog will not eat it.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Lucas Hub Oil?  (Read 6807 times)
JohnEd
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4571




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: February 23, 2009, 10:17:06 AM »

Long ago there was(is) a product called STP.  It closely followed something called "Motor Honey".  These were "new tech" wonder products.  I used them for awhile.  The testimonials read like this thread.....cured everything from acne to rumitis.  I think Lucas is related to those products and only cause it is golden and thick.  I quit using the stuff cause there was a bombshell piece of breaking news back then that said the stuff was creating large amts of sludge that was ruining engines.  My oil pressure went up LOTS with that stuff.  A number of things came up about those heavy viscous additives and I am not saying all of them applied to Lucas:  They increased viscosity and subsequently oil pressure.  They broke down and made sludge.  The prevented the cooling that results from oil flow/bath and that accelerated wear and failure.  They had poor temp stability and turned to a rather hard substance in winter.  The increased vis robbed MPG....especially in a trans.  This stuff has been around for 50 years that I know of and it seems to be "discovered" every ten or so years.  Then it fades....again.

This stuff isn't that costly and if it was the magic that the mfr says it would be added to every new car in the world straight from the factory.  That being said, if I had a bad steering box or whatever I would add the stuff and hope.  At that point it would not have a down side.

To properly eval these "wonder" products you need that engineer.  There is a lot of data out there on the relative virtues of different oils and additives and i am sure there is a tech discussion on the "scientific" advantages of this one.  Lubricity and cling properties and "impact resistance(diff grease)" and a host of others.  Again, I would use this stuff in a New York minute in a "failing" system just to nurse it along for a while.

There is a product that passes all the Dine stuff right up and is proved.  Truckers are said to have changed to this stuff right after it was introduced.  Synthetics!!!!  Truckers use a temp gauge in their diffs and on a long hill and in the desert heat they will slow to protect an overheating diff.  Even have coolers and pumps on the diffs.  Synthetics are PROVEN to be the slipperiest stuff on the planet next to snot on a peeled onion, that you can pour into an engine.  It was a wonder product when they first introduced it to the automotive market and it still is and has no down side.  Alas, it to is not all created equal so choose wisely young Skywalker.

For wheel bearings there first was that stuff with fibers that would cling and pack nicely.  Then they found out how to formulate grease so it didn't need fibers.  The MCI bearings originally came packed with grease....I think.  Any way many did.  Time went by and they had a better idea and that was to run the bearing in 140wt oil or some such.  My understanding is that the oil served to carry some of the heat away from the bearing and in severe use save it's life.  Heavier oil, like honey, will carry away less heat as did bearing grease.  Freshly packed and without a heat consideration I think grease is better.  Then there is roll Resistance and MPG.  The truckers quickly started switching to Syn in the trans and PS and other places although the engine oil seems spendy to me.

Don't forget what I said about my being quick to use the stuff in a badly worn or failing sys....I am with you there.

John

 
Logged

"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
Old4103
Guest

« Reply #16 on: February 23, 2009, 10:38:04 AM »

MCI recommends SAE 30 in the leading and trailing axles on the 96 and 102 series buses.. (See Picture Below)
Logged
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12908




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2009, 11:13:28 AM »

Dallas, to me it is funny how different manufactures using the same bearing use a different lubrication guide on my CAT equipment it was 10w motor oil in the transmissions and the final drives where the most wear was they used 15/40 engine oil same as the engine.I about come to the conclusion if it's wet and slick it works.      good luck
Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
Old4103
Guest

« Reply #18 on: February 23, 2009, 12:18:51 PM »

Me too.

I've seen just about every kind of lubricant used in just about every bearing from our old McCorrmick Deering Trac-Tractor to my 1941 A-40 Mack to the newest and bestest truck and heavy equipment. Some of it doesn't make a bit of sense.

Dallas

Dallas, to me it is funny how different manufactures using the same bearing use a different lubrication guide on my CAT equipment it was 10w motor oil in the transmissions and the final drives where the most wear was they used 15/40 engine oil same as the engine.I about come to the conclusion if it's wet and slick it works.      good luck
Logged
Lin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4583

1965 MC-5a




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: February 23, 2009, 02:04:55 PM »

John.

I was also an old STP user.  It really sticks to metal.  I do not think the Lucas power steering additive is the same.  It is a good deal less viscous.  I tried another additive first and it did not work.  This one did.  I once worked for an engineering company that did some work for Martin Marietta when they were making part of the Space Shuttles.  They had ordered a piece of equipment without checking the height clearance needed to get it inside.  When it came it was so big that putting wheels under it would have made it to high to get into the building.  What they ended up doing was spreading STP on the concrete and sliding the thing in.  I thought that was impressive.  Also, I once met an engine rebuilder that said he could tell when he got an engine that had used STP.  He said that coating stuck to the metal and was a nuisance to get off.  It sounded to me that it was a negative for him, but might be a positive for the engine.  That's just speculation, of course.
Logged

You don't have to believe everything you think.
johns4104s
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 865





Ignore
« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2009, 04:53:43 PM »

I have run Royal Purple in the engine,transmission and rear end( all diffrent grades) in my 4104 for 10 years. A guy I worked with always ran it in his pick up, one day his wife had the oil changed and after a week when he was driving he noticed no oil pressure. After dipping the engine no oil, the plug had been left off. He just filled it back up with RP and it ran another 67,000 miles and is still running. He used to be in one of there adds.
I believed in it so much I put it in my 135,000 mile cadlilac, after 3000 miles I found that it had cleaned the engine so good, dropped the dirt into the filter, stopped the filter up. Starved the main bearings they started to rattle. You really have to know what you are doing with these oils.

John
Logged
gus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3540





Ignore
« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2009, 05:37:46 PM »

I used STP once for a short while when my Slant 6 started a main bearing clatter and until I had time to overhaul it. I didn't notice anything unusual when I finally got around to the overhaul.

Since then I only use it for newly overhauled engines on the cam lobes and lifter faces.

I can see how it could clog an oil filter but the filter bypass should continue feeding oil to the engine?
Logged

PD4107-152
PD4104-1274
Ash Flat, AR
johns4104s
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 865





Ignore
« Reply #22 on: February 24, 2009, 07:54:50 AM »

Gus,

It was the Royal Purple that clogged the filter, It cleaned the engine and dumped it into the filter. I should have but did not changethe filter and topped it up after 1000 miles.

John
Logged
Brian Diehl
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 986




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: February 24, 2009, 05:18:41 PM »

On the MCI drive axle hubs the wheel seal goes inside another "ring".  This "ring" is then bolted to the back side of the hub.  I'll try and find a picture and scan it in so you can see.

Jim,
I could not find a picture in the maintenance manual the picture in the parts manual is wrong.  Sorry.
Logged
Sojourner
Jesus Love You!
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 894


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #24 on: February 24, 2009, 06:02:29 PM »

On the MCI drive axle hubs the wheel seal goes inside another "ring".  This "ring" is then bolted to the back side of the hub.  I'll try and find a picture and scan it in so you can see.


Jim,
I could not find a picture in the maintenance manual the picture in the parts manual is wrong.  Sorry.


Brian...this may not be exactly the ones you were refering to but read on.

Jim...this is what repair the worn grooved and nick on axle surfaces.

........................................................................
CR (Chicago Rawhide) seal are now own by SKF.

Scotseal is their trade name for 2 part seal into one assembly. This will seal over worn groove or nick seal surface on axle shaft.

The Scotseal PlusXL, the one that need NO tool to install…light press fit…it unlike the other Scotseal that require a tool to drive it in equally.

See for your self a close-up of all 3 versions.

Scotseals®

FWIW

Sojourn for Christ, Gerald
Logged

http://dalesdesigns.net/names.htm
Ps 28 Blessed be the LORD, because he hath heard the voice of my supplications. The LORD is my strength and my shield; my heart trusted in him, and I am helped: therefore my heart greatly rejoiceth; and with my song will I praise him
Brian Diehl
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 986




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: February 25, 2009, 07:22:20 PM »

Jerry, The ring I'm speaking of does not go on the axle and is not this particular product you refer to.  This is an aluminum ring.  The standard seal is pressed into it.  Then the ring is fitted to the back side of the hub after putting in the bearings.  A paper seal is used between the ring and the hub. The ring is screwed onto the hub using 6 (or maybe 8 ) phillips head screws.  The whole hub assembly is then pushed onto the axle where the seal "seals" against the axle.
Logged
PP
Will & Wife
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1063



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #26 on: February 25, 2009, 07:56:00 PM »

It's really rough having access to the latest technology via the internet, and then going to the parts store and the guy behind the counter not having a clue as to what you're talking about! Huh One place I tried to get my seals at didn't have any options except for National and they were 5-7 days out. The place I did buy them was able to overnight them in, but I didn't have a choice on brand or style. In fact, the ones I thought I was getting turned out to be different when they arrived. Ended up with Scot Classic and felt fortunate for that LOL. Great website for seals and such. Very worthwhile information. Thanks for posting it Gerald. Grin
Will
Logged

HighTechRedneck
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2935


BCM Editor


WWW
« Reply #27 on: February 25, 2009, 11:50:49 PM »

I thought I would point out for anyone who might be having the same trouble finding them, one feature of that site is a map and contact information for their sales managers.  The appropriate sales manager could identify who carries them.

http://www.vsm.skf.com/en-US/SalesContacts/HDSalesUSA.aspx

Logged
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!