Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
October 25, 2014, 11:57:58 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: It takes up much less space in your bus.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Should ceiling fans suck or blow?  (Read 4876 times)
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1894


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« on: February 24, 2009, 02:50:14 AM »

I'm talking about simple ventilation fans here, not air conditioning - should they blow fresh air into the bus or suck hot air out? Or would the ideal be to have some sucking and some blowing to have a flow of air through the bus? I've got a total of five openings in my roof, and I'm not sure how to configure them for best effect. In brief, I have two large opening skylights in the middle of the roof, one towards the front and one towards the back. The skylights don't have fans fitted, although I know it is possible to do so. In addition, there is a fairly small fan-powered vent in the middle of the roof about two-thirds of the way along the bus. The fan in this vent 'sucks', and the vent is of the 'permanently open' mushroom-type (which makes me wonder whether I will lose lots of heat through it).

Lastly, there are two large vents located in the centre of the bus, but at the sides of the roof above where the baggage racks used to be. These large vents opened on an air-operated system controlled by the driver, and had very powerful fans fitted to them that blew air down ducting in the baggage racks to the vents above each seat. I have removed the big fans and the ducting, and want to fit much smaller fans to the vents, but I cannot decide whether the new fans should suck or blow - although on one side of the bus the vent is located immediately above the kitchen area, so I guess that one should suck at least.

What do you think?

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
jjrbus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2313

MCI5C/N Ft Myers FL




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2009, 03:27:56 AM »

Hey Jeremy, most RV vent fans are reversible. You walk in the RV and it has been closed up all day in the sun. Maybe not a problem in the UK?  It is real hot inside so you want to suck/blow the hot air out.

 Now you have me thinking, I cannot remember any reason to suck/blow outside air into the bus?? I do not recall ever doing it.

  http://www.fantasticvent.com/products/products.html     Link to RV vent manufacturer you will see most are reversible.
                                     HTH  Jim
Logged

Remember, even at a Mensa convention someone is the dumbest person in the room!

http://photobucket.com/buspictures

http://photobucket.com/buspictures
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1894


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2009, 03:59:32 AM »

Thanks for the reply. I had thought of reversible fans, but am not sure how it affects the type of fan to buy - I was actually leaning towards AC fans (cheap, efficient, silent, and fit the space well), but I have not seen these in a reversible format. I expect there are 24v DC fans out there that would do the job, but I've not come across them yet (although I have not really researched the market yet)

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
NewbeeMC9
NewbeeMC9
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1167


1981 MC9 8V71, HT 740




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2009, 05:43:23 AM »

Jeremy,

Reversible will leave you the most options since conditions will change whenever you travel or where your sitting.  Seems you would want the ducted one to lean toward blowing down the duct.

Just my tucense. Smiley
Logged

It's all fun and games til someone gets hurt. Wink
WEC4104
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 779





Ignore
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2009, 05:52:38 AM »

I'd like to take Jeremy's question a little deeper and discuss usage of reversible Fantastic-like roof fans.  I have two installed (bathroom and bedroom).  I frequently use them on very warm days that are not quiote to the point of needing A/C.  

I almost always run mine in the exhaust direction.  If I come into the bus after it has been closed up and I need to cool things down a bit, I crack a couple windows open and turn the fans on. My rationale is that the heat is going to be up near the ceiling. I want to get that sucked out the fan openings, rather than pushed through the bus and out a window.

Sometimes I may only open the windows on one side of the bus, depending on an outside wind direction or the side that is out of the sun and cooler.

There have also been times when I have considered setting one fan to exhaust and the other pulling air in.  My thought would be to try to set up a directional flow from one fan to the other. Typically the bathroom fan would be set exhaust with the bedroom pumping in air to backfill.   That might be used to get rid of moisture after a shower, or to ventilate after some other bathroom activity I won't get into discussing.  

What do others do with their fan(s)?

Logged

If you're going to be dumb, you gotta be tough.
Tenor
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 991



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2009, 05:58:49 AM »

I've got 3 reversible  Fantastic roof fans and I love 'em!  Hot bus? Pull air in from the rear, pust air out from the front.  Vise versa.  You definitley want to be able to suck air out of the shower/bathroom area.

You could use single direction fans since you have so many options.  Draw air in throught the floor vents (powered or not) and pull air out from the roof.  That would cover most situations, and you could do that with AC powered fans.  Good luck!

Glenn
Logged

Glenn Williams
Lansing, MI
www.threemenandatenor.com
1968 MCI 7 Ser. No. 7476 Unit No. 10056
8v71
4 speed Spicer
HighTechRedneck
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2935


BCM Editor


WWW
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2009, 07:29:31 AM »

I've always had the most success using fans to exhaust air out rather than blowing in.
Logged
H3Jim
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1398


1995 Prevost H3-41, series 60, B500 Allison




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2009, 07:50:08 AM »

I have two Fantasitc fans, and although they are reversible, I have alwasy used them to exhaust the air up and out.

If I had a ceiling fan, I'd probably want it to be reversible, so I could try it both ways, but I bet if I found it worked better in one direction, thats the one I'd always use.  The ones in my house seem to work better blowing up rather than down.

I am considering putting a ceiling fan above the bed, and as it turns out, one of the original bus esdape hatches would be just above and in front of where I  mount the fan.  I suspect that having the fan blow up, and the hatch open would be the best, get that cooler air coming in all the windows.

Logged

Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1894


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2009, 08:55:21 AM »

On my bus it isn't possible to open the windows, but the idea of having all the ceiling fans/vents 'sucking', and to have fresh air coming in at a low level somehow is a good one. I will also have AC incidentally, but only in the form of a fairly small unit mounted in one of the bays (actually a portable office-type AC unit that I already have). I don't expect to use the AC very often, but with it's big windows my bus is a bit of a greenhouse on hot days, which is why I'm concerned to have a decent ventilation system, and I'm at the stage of needing to make some decisions as I am currently working on the ceiling.

Thanks for the replies so far

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
H3Jim
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1398


1995 Prevost H3-41, series 60, B500 Allison




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2009, 09:22:42 AM »

NOt sure how strong the sun is there, but in southern California, the sun coming in those big windows puts a lot more heat in than anything but the 9 tons of bus airconditioning could deal with.  When I'm parked, three roof airs would not be able to keep up with it.  I put front to back awnings on both sides, and that makes a HUGE difference in the amount of heat I have to deal with.  Just awnings and open windows is enough sometimes.
Logged

Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
Don4107
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 407





Ignore
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2009, 09:27:33 AM »

We have one of the roof vent fans that is variable speed and reversible with a thermostat.  Seems to be very ineffective as fans go.  We carry a 24 inch box type el cheapo fan.  We set it against what ever window we want and blow out or in depending on conditions.  Many times more effective than roof mounted fan.

Typically if we come 'home' to a hot bus we put it in the bedroom and open a window/s in the front.  If we don't want to run the air all night we will put it up front and open a bedroom window.  Bedroom hot from driving during the day, (engine heat) put it in the bedroom and open the other bedroom window and move lots of air to cool it down quick.  

If I could come up with a good way to build a spot to put a box fan enclosure in the new bus I would.  Beats the roof mount fans and a bunch cheaper. The only likely spot is the rear cap.  Hoping that the much better insulation in the new rig will make it less of an issue.

Don 4107
Logged

Don 4107 Eastern Washington
1975 MCI 5B
1966 GM PD 4107 for sale
1968 GMC Carpenter
gus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3524





Ignore
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2009, 11:51:28 AM »

To me, this boils down to the basics of air circulation which are that a fan is an air pump.

Any pump needs and intake and an outlet.  If all fans exhaust the bus will be evacuated and will collapse or if all fans intake the bus will expand and explode (just kidding!)!

The bus is the air chamber so it needs both inlets and outlets.

As already posted, the main idea in a bus is to vent the heat from the ceiling which includes the bath and kitchen.

So, for hot weather in a bus, the ideal setup is inlets at the floor and outlets in the ceiling. Ceiling fans therefore should exhaust, the problem is where to have intakes.

Most passenger buses have some type of lower fresh air intake designed into the original heating  system. I use this on my 4104 although most all my windows are original and still open so I have a choice.

It is also possible to use one ceiling fan for exhaust and another fan or vent for intake but this is not nearly as efficient as having a floor intake. In this case it is not necessary to run both fans, just the exhaust. Or, if parked, just leave the door open and exhaust with all ceiling fans.
Logged

PD4107-152
PD4104-1274
Ash Flat, AR
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5448




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2009, 12:04:14 PM »

I had two Fantastic Vents in my travel trailer plus a regular vent with fan in the bathroom.

If I turned on only one vent with all other vents and windows closed the fan would struggle because it couldn't move any air.  It was fine if the other vent or a window was open.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1894


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #13 on: February 24, 2009, 12:27:10 PM »

I suppose in many ways we should not even be discussing this as it should be a question that has already been answered by the original designers of the bus. Thinking about my situation, there are indeed air intakes at floor level, where the air was again ducted along both sides of the bus to serve every passenger. This system has both 'inside intakes' (to recirculate the existing air) and 'outside intakes' to bring in fresh air. The reason why I had not thought of this system in conjunction with the ceiling vents before is because the floor system is built around a couple of huge heat exchangers, so in my mind I had catagorized it as 'just' a heating system - but I suppose it will also act as an intake of cold air to replace that extracted by the ceiling fans. Obvious when you think about it, but it has taken this thread to make me realise it.

So the simple answer to my original question is that all the ceiling fans should suck.

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
Nissan_DownUnder
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 36





Ignore
« Reply #14 on: February 24, 2009, 12:33:55 PM »

Hi Jeremy,

The conditions in NZ are very similar to the UK, so our experience is probably relevant to your situation.  Our bus came with two large powerful ceiling fans, one in the front & one in the back.  The fans are capable of running at 3 speeds in either direction.  So far we have used them almost exclusively to suck air out and have very seldom used them to blow it in.  Generally we use them on high speed for the first 10 min after we have opened the bus up & then if the weather is warm set them to low while we drive.

In the cooler weather, we found that we lost a reasonable amount of heat through the fans, so we made covers for them to seal them up.  Generally, we only noticed the heat loss, overnight when parked.

We have removed the OTR airconditioning & in NZ, don't think we will need it.  We just open the windows.  When we move back to Australia, we will probably install several rooftop units.

Cheers
    Peter
Logged

Peter
Nissan UA440,  Wellington, New Zealand
cody
Guest

« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2009, 01:43:58 PM »

The fantastic vent fan is good but I'm partial to the Maxxair fan, simply because the fan is located outside the bus in a shroud, I believe they are both 12 inch fans but I prefer the spinning fan and what samall amount of noise it creates to be outside the bus.  http://www.maxxair.com/Products/Turbo-Maxx.aspx
Logged
gus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3524





Ignore
« Reply #16 on: February 24, 2009, 02:18:44 PM »

If you haven't installed your AC yet be sure to install the front one as far forward as possible. I cannot overemphasize this enough. Those huge windshields bring in more heat than you can ever imagine.

Cooling the bus bedroom area does not take much AC unless you are daytime parked for long times in hot sunny areas. For overnight parking with no sun an AC in or near the bedroom gets too cold. We very seldom use the rear AC because it is too close to the bedroom. I'm thinking of moving my rear one to the front but I hate to cut any more holes in the roof.
Logged

PD4107-152
PD4104-1274
Ash Flat, AR
rv_safetyman
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2199


Jim Shepherd


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2009, 05:10:10 AM »

We,too, have the Fantastic Fans (3).  For the most part we use them as exhaust fans.

However, in the bedroom we wait unit the sun goes down and the roof cools off.  We then switch it to blowing in.  This puts a bit of air flow over the bed and helps cool us.  Even in some pretty warm conditions, it helps us feel more comfortable.  Certainly better than running the generator all night when not connected to a pole.

Jim
Logged

Jim Shepherd
Evergreen, CO
’85 Eagle 10/Series 60/Eaton AutoShift 10 speed transmission
Somewhere between a tin tent and a finished product
Bus Project details: http://beltguy.com/Bus_Project/busproject.htm
Blog:  http://rvsafetyman.blogspot.com/
John Z
1959 GM PD-4104 4139 Northern Minnesota
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 518


"Tubby"


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2009, 07:23:53 AM »

When i bought my bus, i hated the looks of the exhaust hood over the stove. It was a recirculating type so it really did not do much anyway,,, just hung there looking stupid and ugly. There was an older non-powered roof vent located right there, so i replaced it with a powered one. Set to exhaust, it does a wonderful job on venting out heat and steam etc from cooking. It has a thermostat, so it really comes in handy when cooking with the crock pot and we want to leave the coach for a few hours.

Another handy fan is the 12.00 12v camping fans sold at wallyworld. They have a leg arrangement that folds out from the back. I mounted one vertically on the upper cabinets right above the bed. The fan portion can be tilted out/down to any angle. It has a hi/low switch and i have the on/pff switch mounted where i can reach it from bed. Makes a real nice "ceiling fan" for the bed. I have a couple of these and can move them anywhere in the bus they are needed to help move air.
Logged

Custom patches, caps, t-shirts, lapel pins etc since 1994.
Silver Brook Custom Embroidery and Patches
www.silverbrook-mn.com
 
"Now I Know Why Turtles Look So Smug"
jjrbus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2313

MCI5C/N Ft Myers FL




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: February 27, 2009, 03:44:12 PM »

Hot bus, big windows, greenhouse?  Me thinks awnings at each window would do far more than a dozen fans!!  Jim
Logged

Remember, even at a Mensa convention someone is the dumbest person in the room!

http://photobucket.com/buspictures

http://photobucket.com/buspictures
gus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3524





Ignore
« Reply #20 on: February 27, 2009, 03:53:21 PM »

I started to install awnings when I got the bus. The PO even gave me a new 20' awning.

Then I noticed in the CW catalog how many different devices there were for holding down and rigging awnings. That told me that they were a real problem, just like all the stuff for sealing rubber roof leaks!!

Then I read all the stories in RV magazines about awnings blowing away in sudden wind gusts and storms and of people having them come loose running down the road. I'm a slow learner but I got the message, no awnings for me.

They no doubt do a great job and I would like to have that benefit but the hassle is not worth it.
Logged

PD4107-152
PD4104-1274
Ash Flat, AR
H3Jim
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1398


1995 Prevost H3-41, series 60, B500 Allison




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: February 27, 2009, 04:11:32 PM »

John Z, any pics of that wally world fan?
Logged

Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
jjrbus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2313

MCI5C/N Ft Myers FL




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: February 27, 2009, 05:31:17 PM »

There are awnings like my 21 by 8 foot awning and then there are window awnings!!
Logged

Remember, even at a Mensa convention someone is the dumbest person in the room!

http://photobucket.com/buspictures

http://photobucket.com/buspictures
John Z
1959 GM PD-4104 4139 Northern Minnesota
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 518


"Tubby"


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2009, 07:31:15 PM »

Hi Jim (H3Jim),

I am heading home from the tropical tip of Texas and am stopped for the night in mid-Arkansas. I should be home in a couple days depending on the weather up there. When i get home i will post pictures of the fan. I bought a new camera on the way down a few weeks ago and have not spent the time to learn how to resize photos.

John
Logged

Custom patches, caps, t-shirts, lapel pins etc since 1994.
Silver Brook Custom Embroidery and Patches
www.silverbrook-mn.com
 
"Now I Know Why Turtles Look So Smug"
H3Jim
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1398


1995 Prevost H3-41, series 60, B500 Allison




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: March 01, 2009, 11:35:52 AM »

Thanks, I use Fastone, a free, shareware image viewer.  It has a great section that I use all the time to email pictures to my friends and family.  Since much of my family is still on dial up,  the yare sensitve to the picture size I send them.  For pics I post here, I send them to myself, save the attachements (Pictures) and then up load the picture to the board.  I'm sure there are easier ways, but I backed into it and it works for me.  Your mileage will vary.

 http://www.faststone.org/FSViewerDetail.htm

I just went to the Fastone site, and this next link is the index page, and they have a free, standalone photo resizer. 

http://www.faststone.org/index.htm

I look forward to seeing  the pics.  These new cameras are great, but all this stuff has a learning curve.  I joke that even my microwave is smarter than I am these days.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2009, 12:09:20 PM by H3Jim » Logged

Jim Stewart
El Cajon, Ca.  (San Diego area)

Travel is more than the seeing of sights, it is a change that goes on, deep  and permanent, in the ideas of living.
Tony LEE
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 393



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #25 on: March 04, 2009, 09:13:08 AM »

The original designers of the bus were counting on coping with 60 tired Londoners getting home in bumper to bumper traffic so the direction of the original air flow will not be all that relevant. We spent a month in the UK in late summer and too much heat was never an issue. Too much rain, too much traffic perhaps, but never too much heat.
We are in Morocco for the winter and you would never have to worry about too much heat even here except maybe right down the bottom. Middle of Summer in Morocco would be crazy.

Interesting to note and resulted in a bit of a chuckle from me was the sight of many Europeans and Brits parking in full sun, carefully covering their tyres against damage from the sun and then putting out the lounge chairs and stretching out as naked as was decently possible to soak up the sun all day. Skin must be tougher than tyres.
Logged

JohnEd
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4571




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: March 04, 2009, 09:38:03 AM »

Gus,

There are so many coaches equipped with awnings that "some" must be installed or maintained poorly.  Also,  any awning will blow away in wind.  If you are home wind is easy to detect as the entire coach rocks from the sail force exerted by the awning.  Problem is when you leave for the afternoon and wind comes up.  That will rip the thing right off.  There are three clamps that restrain the thing from opening while you travel.  A clamp that is detented on the arm, a screw down clamp on the arm and the "cog wheel" like mech in the roller that won't unwind till a lever is thrown.  I have never seen one unrolled on the road and I acct for 67 years of looking down roads. 

These things add so much to the comfort of the coach that I hope you will find some way around your considerations.  Quality install and a qualified operator are the key issues.

HTH,

John
Logged

"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
BG6
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 642




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: March 04, 2009, 09:50:34 AM »

I'm talking about simple ventilation fans here, not air conditioning - should they blow fresh air into the bus or suck hot air out? Or would the ideal be to have some sucking and some blowing to have a flow of air through the bus?

That's the ideal!

You can't suck air out unless you're letting air in somewhere else.

You want your exhaust fans to be as close to the peak of the ceiling as possible, and intake fans lower than that, to take advantage of natural airflow.  If you have escape hatches, these are a really good place to mount fans or aircons.
Logged
BG6
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 642




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: March 04, 2009, 09:54:27 AM »

On my bus it isn't possible to open the windows,

They don't swing out for emergency exit?  Every coach I've seen has the windows hinged at the top and latched at the bottom.

This means that you can put a screen across the inside, open the window and prop it open through a small hole in the screen.
Logged
BG6
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 642




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: March 04, 2009, 10:01:06 AM »

I started to install awnings when I got the bus. The PO even gave me a new 20' awning.

Then I noticed in the CW catalog how many different devices there were for holding down and rigging awnings. That told me that they were a real problem, just like all the stuff for sealing rubber roof leaks!!

Then I read all the stories in RV magazines about awnings blowing away in sudden wind gusts and storms and of people having them come loose running down the road. I'm a slow learner but I got the message, no awnings for me.

They no doubt do a great job and I would like to have that benefit but the hassle is not worth it.

You see all of those different mechanisms because each company wants to make money from you.

I've never seen a awning be a problem on the road except when the owner failed to cage it properly before driving away.  However, a friend of mine worries about this, so he developed a simple, foolproof lock -- he put eyebolts in above and below the awning, about a foot back from the front support, and sticks a bungee there.  If the front is secured, the rear won't be a problem unless you get a 75 MPH tailwind.

In the campground, just close it up if there is a windstorm.

Logged
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1894


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #30 on: March 04, 2009, 01:22:19 PM »

On my bus it isn't possible to open the windows,

They don't swing out for emergency exit?  Every coach I've seen has the windows hinged at the top and latched at the bottom.

This means that you can put a screen across the inside, open the window and prop it open through a small hole in the screen.

No, European coaches like mine are required by law to have emergency exit doors rather than using the windows to escape. In fact the windows don't even have frames as they are bonded directly to the steel. They are also very large, have curved glass and are double glazed (twin pane), so are incredibly heavy - but I love them, and they are one of the main reasons I bought my bus.

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
BG6
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 642




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: March 05, 2009, 01:23:05 PM »

No, European coaches like mine are required by law to have emergency exit doors rather than using the windows to escape.

Yeah, that would put a crimp in things.

Could you modify an existing window?  You could single-pane it and put a small slider at the bottom.
Logged
Jeremy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1894


1987 Bedford Plaxton


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #32 on: March 05, 2009, 02:29:58 PM »

Anything is possible, but there is no need to as, thanks to the replies to this thread, I've realised that I just need to use the bus ventilation as it was originally designed. Air in at floor level and out at ceiling level - obvious really. I think some of the later comments regarding awnings are equally valid; I've always planned to have awnings but don't have any fitted yet, and have experienced how hot it can get in the bus with the windows unshaded (contrary to belief, it does occasionally stop raining here, and not only because it's snowing instead). Anyway, it's entirely possible I will take the bus next time I drive down to an event in southern Spain, and then I will wish I had a roof-ful of AC units.

Jeremy
Logged

A shameless plug for my business - visit www.magazineexchange.co.uk for back issue magazines - thousands of titles covering cars, motorbikes, aircraft, railways, boats, modelling etc. You'll find lots of interest, although not much covering American buses sadly.
Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!