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Author Topic: Removing paint  (Read 2319 times)
NCRealAuctions
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1975 MC8




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« on: April 09, 2006, 08:43:30 AM »

I need some advice on the best way to remove exterior paint off the coach body made of aluminum on my MC-8.  I been told to have the bus soda blasted.  This is a very expensive process.  I was quoted $4000.00 which I consider to be highway robbery. Others have suggested using aircraft stripper.  I am concerned that I might not be able to remove this chemical with a pressure washer from under the coach rivets and thus damage the future paint.  Your suggestions will certainly be appreciated....Ron
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alkco1-rts
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« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2006, 09:23:03 AM »

When I was involved in rebuilding aircraft we used paint stripped all the time. the secret is to wash the surface with warm soapy water after you are done using the striper.
leroy
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Ross
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« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2006, 02:25:42 PM »

I used aircraft stripper.  No problems at all.  I didn't even pressure wash it afterwards.  Just washed it with soap and water and a hose.
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Danny
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87' MCI 102A3 - getting there...


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« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2006, 07:47:50 PM »

Please give more information about this product - aircraft striper.  What is it called?

Thanks
Danny
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I have heard it said, "life comes at you fast".  I didn't know it would be in the shape of a bus  :-)
Clarke Echols
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« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2006, 08:10:11 PM »

It's called "aircraft stripper".  :-)  Available at most respectable automotive paint stores.

It is a gel-like material containing some very aggressive solvents.  The gel keeps in in place while the chemicals do their magic.  The paint wrinkles and turns loose of the substrate underneath, then you wash it off with water.  You may need to use a wide-blade putty knife/scraper to give it a little help, but it shouldn't need much if you put it on right.  It comes in 1-gallon cans with a corner cap, similar to what
paint thinner and such come in.

It is compatible with steel, aluminum, and other metals, and is commonly used in the aircraft industry.  That's why it's called aircraft stripper, but even in the automotive and other trades, they still use the same term.  It is sold "for use by the professional trade only", so don't expect to act like a stupid consumer, screw up, then become independently wealthy by winning a mega-lawsuit.  The residue is water soluble, so it should wash clean with a good car-washing or quality liquid household detergent (some liquid dishwashing detergents are rather ineffective despite lots of advertising and high sales).

Clarke


Please give more information about this product - aircraft striper.  What is it called?

Thanks
Danny
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glang
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1998 Prevost XLT




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« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2006, 02:30:24 PM »

We have had great luck SODA BLASTING. It will not damage anything.

Gary
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