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Author Topic: Buying a bus to take to Florida or in Florida  (Read 3468 times)
Jerry32
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« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2009, 12:39:28 PM »

Most likely if you don't get stopped or in an accident nobody will ever ask you for a permit or license. I was told this by a cop that they dont't look at busses very hard for anything.
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1988 MCI 102A3 8V92TA 740
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« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2009, 04:44:22 PM »

Quote from: blue_goose
I am sure that here if Florida that you can find another bus nut that will help you get the bus home. 

Thanks, and I may just have to ask if it comes to that.
I am taking my time to learn and get a good feel for the different types of buses as I see many different types and am on a budget so that is why I was thinking of converting a County School bus or similar bus as long as it had the proper rear end gear ratio for highway travel.
Quote from: blue_goose
Just a CDL won't be all you need to meet the law, you also need a P endorsement if you have anyone else in the bus with you.

I am going to try to avoid getting a CDL. I thought about it at one point but decided if the same vehicle is a motor home and not a bus and it is not required then I should just worry about making the changes as soon as I can to make it a motor home.
Quote from: blue_goose
I don't know about Florida, but when I bought my bus NC didn't ask to see it before they gave me the title as a Motor Home. 
You can always buy the bus, get the title changed to motor home then go after it.  Be sure that you do get insurance before driving anything.
If I can be of any help we live in Polk City Fl and have the proper license to drive the bus.
Jack
Thanks for the good advice and I would never drive any vehicle nowadays without insurance.
Again thanks for the advice Jack!
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RJ
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« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2009, 07:15:56 PM »



. . . so that is why I was thinking of converting a County School bus or similar bus as long as it had the proper rear end gear ratio for highway travel.



FYI - Skoolies, especially dog-nosed ones, are extremely difficult to obtain insurance for as a conversion.  You will also run into resistance at many an RV park because of the "hippie" connotation that's associated w/ skoolies of this body style.

OTOH, a transit body style skoolie doesn't suffer the same stigma, so that might be an option.

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink
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RJ Long
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Fresno CA
orfunauto/Darrell
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« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2009, 07:29:35 PM »

For all North Carolinians:  There was some info stated previously that you do not need a special license for a motorhome.  PLEASE NOTE:  the following info is taken verbatim off the back of my NC Class B license. 

((((Class B: Any single vehicle that is exempt from CDL requirements with a GVWR of 26,001 pounds of more, and any such vehicle towing a vehicle with a GVWR not in excess of 10,000 pounds.)))) 

Note: there is NO designation of motor home exemption.  As few-and-far-between the license checks here in NC are, if you do get checked, and the officer has had a bad day - you will be cited for improper licensing!  Be careful.
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74 MCI 8
LaGrange, NC
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« Reply #19 on: March 06, 2009, 07:32:35 PM »

Same here in Ontario.

Class of licence has to do with weight, not type of registration.

A busnut typically needs a Class "D", with a "Z" endorsement for airbrakes, or better.

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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RJ
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« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2009, 08:20:28 PM »


For all North Carolinians:  There was some info stated previously that you do not need a special license for a motorhome.  PLEASE NOTE:  the following info is taken verbatim off the back of my NC Class B license. 

((((Class B: Any single vehicle that is exempt from CDL requirements with a GVWR of 26,001 pounds of more, and any such vehicle towing a vehicle with a GVWR not in excess of 10,000 pounds.)))) 

Note: there is NO designation of motor home exemption.  As few-and-far-between the license checks here in NC are, if you do get checked, and the officer has had a bad day - you will be cited for improper licensing!  Be careful.


Time to do your homework:

Go to NC's DMV website, look up the vehicle code book, and determine what the phrase "Any single vehicle that is exempt from CDL requirements" means.

Translation into a question:  What vehicles are exempt from CDL requirements?

Also paw thru the pages and find out what the definition of a motorhome or recreational vehicle is, while you're at it.

Then go to the license types section and find out what licenses are actually required for an RV.

Have fun!!

FWIW & HTH. . .

 Wink
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RJ Long
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« Reply #21 on: March 06, 2009, 11:24:33 PM »

I asked them about a CDL and again was told that I did not need the CDL unless I carried over 9 people or hauled any type of material that was NOT part of the bus.


They told you wrong.

You need a CDL if the GVWR is 26,001 or higher, even if all of the seats are out, until you get it registered as a motor home.


I was told by 2 different people that work for the DMV and one officer at the Southbound Scales on I-85 at Belmont and they said that "IF" I hauled anything in my "private bus", only then I would need CDL's. Thats why they stressed not to haul anything but myself...no people, no furniture, no lumber, no stored boxes, not even firewood.. You say both DMV people and the officer at the scales told me wrong???. You may be right..but could you lead me and the others that were also told wrong to where you got the right info? I was even told I could leave the seats in.... they didn't care about the seats...they only cared if people were sitting in them.  I've searched and searched and can't find anything in writing concerning the State of North Carolina regarding a non-commercial, empty private owned bus, and CDL's. I've already got mine home anyways but sure there are others that may need to read those laws you have since there is so much bad info floating around with the NCDMV..  Thanks...


From the Feds (http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration-licensing/cdl/cdl.htm):

"THE DRIVER

"Drivers have been required to have a CDL in order to drive a CMV since April 1, 1992.

"The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has developed and issued standards for testing and licensing CMV drivers. Among other things, the standards require States to issue CDLs to their CMV drivers only after the driver passes knowledge and skills tests administered by the State related to the type of vehicle to be operated. Drivers need CDLs if they are in interstate, intrastate, or foreign commerce and drive a vehicle that meets one of the following definitions of a CMV:

"Classes of License:

"The Federal standard requires States to issue a CDL to drivers according to the following license classifications:

"Class A -- Any combination of vehicles with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds provided the GVWR of the vehicle(s) being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.

"Class B -- Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing a vehicle not in excess of 10,000 pounds GVWR.

"Class C -- Any single vehicle, or combination of vehicles, that does not meet the definition of Class A or Class B, but is either designed to transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver, or is placarded for hazardous materials. "

Now, a guardhouse lawyer will jump on the "interstate, intrastate, or foreign commerce" part, and say that it doesn't apply to the coach that you just bought.  However, under the law, transporting the coach itself is "commerce" -- it is a commercial vehicle until the minute that a title is issued to it as a motorhome.  It doesn't matter whether or not it's for hire, or what the actual weight is on the scale.  The number of seats only determines whether you need a Passenger endorsement on your CDL to legally drive it. 

This is the LAW.  Luckily, a lot of the time, we can skate around it because of COMMON SENSE on the part of the officials we meet.  However, if you get an Earn While You Learn nugget State Trooper, or a weighmaster bucking for the next pay grade, they can make your day a memorable and unpleasant one.
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blue_goose
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« Reply #22 on: March 07, 2009, 04:29:20 AM »

If you drive a Motor Home with a dealer tag you have to have a CDL.  It isn't a motor home when it has a dealer tag.
Jack
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orfunauto/Darrell
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« Reply #23 on: March 07, 2009, 05:13:48 PM »

RJ, 

I have done my homework.  That's why I went and obtained a class B endorsement on my license.  Your interpretation of our laws here in NC by reading them on line does not back up what I have been told by several law enforcement personnel including the NC DOT.  I'd rather get my info from the person that can cite me, without having it interpreted in court and handing the government more of my hard earned money. Roll Eyes 
It only cost me a few dollars, and a little of my time to prevent fines and towing fees.......       
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74 MCI 8
LaGrange, NC
Povertyhill
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« Reply #24 on: March 09, 2009, 05:00:38 AM »

Quote from: RJ link

FYI - Skoolies, especially dog-nosed ones, are extremely difficult to obtain insurance for as a conversion.  You will also run into resistance at many an RV park because of the "hippie" connotation that's associated w/ skoolies of this body style.

Actually I am surprised that more people do not use skoolies to convert! Since you can find many that are bluebird stubbies as well as short nosed Int..

When I talked to my insurance company their concern was for the registration being a motorhome and not a bus. But since you mention it I will question them further to be sure my information was correct.

I have seen some real nice conversions and so I guess I am surprised that some still consider them a hippie mobile just because they used to watch the Partridge family years ago..

Thanks again for the advice from everyone.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2009, 05:03:19 AM by Povertyhill » Logged
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