Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
October 22, 2014, 07:38:25 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: You can zoom in to make the text larger and easier to read.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Used Michelin: are these decent deal?  (Read 5366 times)
Paladin
Dave Knight
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 711





Ignore
« on: March 09, 2009, 03:39:43 PM »

I found some used Michelin takeoffs in 12R22.5, about 70% tread, 2007 tires, claims to be in really good condition and the guy says he'd put them up front for steers in a heartbeat. Only problem is that I think he only has 3 otherwise I'd use them in back but I'd just need 2 for front I guess unless I could mix and match that odd one but that's not wise is it??
Price is $225.00 each plus $18.00 mount and $25.00 computer spin. Is this reasonable for used Michelins in this condition?
I haven't gone to see them yet, want to see what the jury thinks first since I haven't a clue.

Yea or nay?

-Dave
Logged

'75 MC-8   'Event Horizon'
8V71  HT740
Salt Lake City, Utah

"Have bus will travel read the card of the man, a Knight without armor in a savage land...."
JohnEd
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4571




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2009, 04:27:07 PM »

I say yes!  You could mix on the tags but you can now afford a new Mich to match the odd one.  Rotate from the fronts to the tags and keep the new one in a position that gets the most wear...front vs tag???

From what I am reading of late, caps are the super deal for the rears.  Sean likes the off road knobbies for getting in and out of DISASTERS and just for the showy looks.  Can't have too much traction. Cheesy Roll Eyes Lips Sealed



John
Logged

"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
boogiethecat
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 634



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2009, 04:31:49 PM »

Dave,
I got 6 almost new Michelins mounted on rims from a yard that scrapped school busses, $100 each.  Although I have an idea that was one amazing deal...

You can use  2 of the ones you found on the rears but you can't really mix the third with a new one.  Tread depth -more important actual diameter- much match between any two on the same side rear or they'll eat themselves up. (this doesn't apply to tags though) But to use as duals you'd have to find an old one that matches fairly closely.  What part # are they? If they happen to be XZU-2 I have one unmounted one that I'd send ya for the cost of the shipping (probably around $100) if it's tread depth matches one of yours... it's older by a few years but not much tread's been used.


Mine were all off the front of busses and I used em for steers for a long time... until I found out how QUIET XZA-3's were in comparison.  An AMAZING difference, so I got new XZA-3 steers and stuck these XZU's on the rear.
I have this one as an extra 'cause somewhere along the line I hit one of my rears on it's sidewall and it grew a football.  Had to toss it- this one was it's "inside" mate and is now the orphan...

Cheers
Gary
« Last Edit: March 10, 2009, 08:37:09 AM by boogiethecat » Logged

1962 Crown
San Diego, Ca
BG6
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 642




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2009, 05:04:36 PM »

If you are in SLC, check with the guy at the corner of the streets which Freightliner dealer and Prime Trucking are on.

For that matter, check with the Freightliner repair shop to see if they have any used tires.
Logged
lostagain
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1564


MC5C




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2009, 06:30:23 PM »

I have gotten virgin take-offs from truckers for Cnd$100 each. (US$75). 11R22.5, 1 to 3 years old with 50 to 80% tread on them. Good name brands. That's how much they would get for a casing from the retreaders.

JC
Logged

JC
Invermere, BC
1977 MC5C, 6V92/HT740
HB of CJ
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1263




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2009, 07:23:57 PM »

I would say that is way too much money.  Even though it is the "hard to find" size, that could actually be your advantage because who else is he going to sell them too?  White elephant?

Out here in SW Oregon, the logging industry is dying hard.  Lots of good used equipment and stuff including tires going dirt cheap.  The sellers need the money and will entertain any offer.

A while back I turned down $4000 for a set of ten (10) used 11R x 24.5 Michilens (75% tread remaining) mounted on polished Alcoa wheels mounted and spun balanced on the Crown.

Never got to the point where we determined if longer studs would have been required.  Point is with the economy taking a nose dive, it MAY be possible to hold out for that super deal.

Also be careful about any used truck tire and ask why the tires are available.  Sometimes crash damage may be concelled like flat spots or unseen bead damage from impacts and stuff.  HB of CJ

used tire Post
Logged
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5447




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: March 10, 2009, 05:50:16 AM »

I have gotten virgin take-offs from truckers for Cnd$100 each. (US$75). 11R22.5, 1 to 3 years old with 50 to 80% tread on them. Good name brands. That's how much they would get for a casing from the retreaders.

Why would anyone replace a tire of that age if it had a minimum of 50% tread remaining?
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Paladin
Dave Knight
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 711





Ignore
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2009, 07:24:19 AM »

Yeah, I'm kind of wondering this too. I thought most ran the tires pretty much out before getting rid of them just like a car owner.
I would see it maybe if the vehicle was scrapped but is the vehicle running and in service? Even if the vehicle was scrapped, was there damage that might affect the tires?
That's one of the things that's got me wondering on these tires I found, why so much tread left?

-Dave



I have gotten virgin take-offs from truckers for Cnd$100 each. (US$75). 11R22.5, 1 to 3 years old with 50 to 80% tread on them. Good name brands. That's how much they would get for a casing from the retreaders.

Why would anyone replace a tire of that age if it had a minimum of 50% tread remaining?
Logged

'75 MC-8   'Event Horizon'
8V71  HT740
Salt Lake City, Utah

"Have bus will travel read the card of the man, a Knight without armor in a savage land...."
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12753




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2009, 07:47:56 AM »

How much are you guys paying for new tires I ordered 8 new Toyo M111z 315/80 22.5 to pickup in June and with my Toyo fleet price and the $125.00 trade in on each tire I am under $400.00 each with everything after a 6% increase that went into effect Mar 1, except the 8 new 9 in wide rim's (that is a kicker)  good luck
« Last Edit: March 10, 2009, 08:54:07 AM by luvrbus » Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6852





Ignore
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2009, 08:29:06 AM »

I don't know how anyone could be satisfied with using someone elses take off tires.  Tires are more than just big black round things that hold air to support the bus.  Many are forgetting that tires are the only link to the road and responsible for traction, lateral stability, and most importantly, braking.  Some of you are running open shoulder traction tires on the drives.  While this is an advantage for the very few times you might be in soft dirt, sand or snow, the dry pavement traction is compromised as compared to a highway closed shoulder design.  The only really great traction tire I know of is the Michelin XDN2 (and they know it too because of the price).  It has hundreds of built in sipes that gripe the pavement-whether it be dry, wet or icy.  In my opinion, there is no substitute for quality tires when you and your families safety is on the line going down the road. Please don't get cheap with tires-get cheap in other areas-cheap furniture, plumbing, etc won't get you into an accident.  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
Airbag
Guest

« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2009, 08:39:57 AM »

I don't know how anyone could be satisfied with using someone elses take off tires.  Tires are more than just big black round things that hold air to support the bus.  Many are forgetting that tires are the only link to the road and responsible for traction, lateral stability, and most importantly, braking.  Some of you are running open shoulder traction tires on the drives.  While this is an advantage for the very few times you might be in soft dirt, sand or snow, the dry pavement traction is compromised as compared to a highway closed shoulder design.  The only really great traction tire I know of is the Michelin XDN2 (and they know it too because of the price).  It has hundreds of built in sipes that gripe the pavement-whether it be dry, wet or icy.  In my opinion, there is no substitute for quality tires when you and your families safety is on the line going down the road. Please don't get cheap with tires-get cheap in other areas-cheap furniture, plumbing, etc won't get you into an accident.  Good Luck, TomC

Tom I kind of agree with you based on what my experience at the school bus yard has taught me. I drove the same bus for almost two years and it just amazed me how the garage treated tires. They took zero chances with the tires, I brought the bus in for a very slightly low front tire once and they installed six brand new tires not recaps. They won't add air to a front tire if it is low it means it has a leak and two new tires are installed on the front. What a difference in the way the bus handled and I was amazed at how much softer and quiter the ride was.

Now that said I think we all should use the best tire we can afford. Recaps, used, or new tires which ever the case may be.
Logged
Merlin-PV
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 36




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2009, 08:49:10 AM »

Tom you are right!! but you forgot,to mention, you don't  know the history of the tire: such as curb damage, stone bruise, internal damage from unknown sources like turning the tire backwards.(which causes the wire to pile) not the safest thing. I hope I never meet anyone on the road using them on the steering axle. If you can't afford new tires on at least the front axle you sure can't afford a bus!!!
Logged
Paladin
Dave Knight
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 711





Ignore
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2009, 09:07:25 AM »

If you can't afford new tires on at least the front axle you sure can't afford a bus!!!

Ok, I don't get steamed too often but now I take offense to this. I am so sick and tired of elitist asses telling me what the financial criteria is for owning a bus.
As it turns out, few of us if any actually meet this elitist bar that I see now and then. You run whatever you need to and I'll run what I need to and never our paths shall cross I say and I'll be pleased for that.
My motivating factors and plans are nobody elses concern and it's NOT for others to decree what level each of us should step to in order to own a bus. If you want to buy my tires then you can tell me what I have to buy, if not then kindly keep silent with your opinions and decrees.


 
Logged

'75 MC-8   'Event Horizon'
8V71  HT740
Salt Lake City, Utah

"Have bus will travel read the card of the man, a Knight without armor in a savage land...."
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12753




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2009, 09:29:15 AM »

Good answer Paladin I use my bus 10,000 to 20,000 miles a year traveling in and out of the desert that is the only reason I buy new tires every 3 or 4 years. Good luck  and I when I come to Fairview this summer I'll contact you and buy your lunch
Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5447




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2009, 10:53:19 AM »

The spare tire for my bus is a brand new Firestone, but it is from 1996.  I would replace it right away if I had to use it. 

Someone had bought a brand new shell in 1996 or 1997 and they didn't like the tires so they replaced them when new and I ended up with one of the original tires as a spare. 

Sometimes people replace tires because they don't like them, but I would think they would do it when nearly new, not when they have 50% tread or whatever.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12753




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: March 10, 2009, 12:19:07 PM »

You don't really know if used tires are 50% or what with out knowing the original tread depth some of these tires start at 10/32 and some like the Toyo start at 19/32.You guys correct me if I am wrong here but isn't 2/32 tread the minimum legal limit for the DOT.    good luck
Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
jackhartjr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1326


Beauty is in the eye of the beholder!




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: March 10, 2009, 03:25:17 PM »

Clifford, for a truck it is 2/32nds on all but the steers which are 4/32nds.  I am thinking but not sure that is the same for a bus.
I'll try to check that later.
Jack
Logged

Jack Hart, CDS
1956 GMC PD-4501 #945 (The Mighty SCENICRUISER!)
8V71 Detroit
4 speed Spicer Trannsmission
Hickory, NC, (Where a call to God is a local call!)
BG6
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 642




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: March 10, 2009, 04:25:56 PM »

I have gotten virgin take-offs from truckers for Cnd$100 each. (US$75). 11R22.5, 1 to 3 years old with 50 to 80% tread on them. Good name brands. That's how much they would get for a casing from the retreaders.

Why would anyone replace a tire of that age if it had a minimum of 50% tread remaining?

One reason would be a change to a different tread pattern.  Another would be having lost a tire to damage, and replacing all at once (on duals, putting a new tire next to a worn tire shortens the life of both).
Logged
circusboy90210
Chat Banned
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 271





Ignore
« Reply #18 on: March 10, 2009, 04:55:29 PM »

forgot to mention one big thing about these tires.... they are not american.
Logged
Sean
Geek.
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2553


'85 Neoplan Spaceliner "Odyssey"


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #19 on: March 10, 2009, 08:02:04 PM »

forgot to mention one big thing about these tires.... they are not american.


How do you know?

Most tire manufacturers have US plants, including Yokohama and Toyo.

The only major US brand is Goodyear.  All others are foreign-owned, including Michelin/Goodrich (France) and Bridgestone/Firestone (Japan).

To know where a tire was made (US or overseas) you need to look at the manufacturer's code stamped on the tire, which identifies the plant of origin.  Even Goodyear manufactures overseas.

Welcome to the global economy.

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
Logged

Full-timing in a 1985 Neoplan Spaceliner since 2004.
Our blog: http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
Sean
Geek.
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2553


'85 Neoplan Spaceliner "Odyssey"


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #20 on: March 10, 2009, 08:10:44 PM »

...  Sean likes the off road knobbies for getting in and out of DISASTERS and just for the showy looks.  Can't have too much traction.


Well, I just replaced those tires with... four identical tires.  The open-shoulder tread lasted me about 85,000 miles, and when we pulled the tires off, they were almost exactly five years old, so I probably would have opted to change them soon even if I had not worn the tread off.

I'm guessing that I could have gotten another year/20,000 miles out of a high-mileage rib tire.  I would also guess that these tires cost me about 2%-3% in fuel mileage.  But they have gotten us out of a few dicey situations, and I figure if they saved me even one tow (our $100 per year emergency road service does not cover us off the pavement), they have more than made up for the fuel and wear penalty.

They do "sing" a bit on the highway, but heck, we don't sit in the back!

And they do look butch.   Smiley

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
Logged

Full-timing in a 1985 Neoplan Spaceliner since 2004.
Our blog: http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
gus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 3524





Ignore
« Reply #21 on: March 10, 2009, 09:57:07 PM »

Whether or not something is "American" doesn't have much to do with anything to me. What I want is quality and value. I've had to re-engineer too many "American" things to make them work properly to consider that any advantage any more.

Is my Dodge minivan with a Mitsubishi engine American? Nope, it's made in Canada!
Logged

PD4107-152
PD4104-1274
Ash Flat, AR
TomC
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6852





Ignore
« Reply #22 on: March 11, 2009, 09:23:17 AM »

With 21 years and 1.3 million miles of over the road driving, I don't say this lightly-and the comment of being elitist is the furthest from my mind.  I never had a front tire blow out-why?  Because I was vigilant on both watching my tire pressures (checked all 18 once a week), every time I stopped-which averaged 2-3 hour intervals-I felt the tires for hot runners that would indicate a low pressure situation (I now have Pressure Pros on my bus for continuous pressure sensing-not available when I was driving).  The most important position on the bus is the steer tires. These should always be new tires off the shelf that you know have not been injured in anyway.  Your drivers could be take offs, recaps, etc-since a blowout on the duals or even the tags is not going to be catastrophic, like a steering tire blow out could be.  So when one of us gets a bit strong in our language encouraging you to get the best new tires for the steering axle, maybe, just maybe there is some experience backing up these comments.  Good Luck, TomC
Logged

Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
jackhartjr
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1326


Beauty is in the eye of the beholder!




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: March 11, 2009, 10:01:05 AM »

Clifford...and everyone else;
I said I would check on the tire tread info, this is out of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration book;


Subpart G—Miscellaneous parts and accessories 
§393.75 Tires.
(a) No motor vehicle shall be operated on any tire that (1) has body ply or belt material exposed through the tread or sidewall, (2) has any tread or sidewall separation, (3) is flat or has an audible leak, or (4) has a cut to the extent that the ply or belt material is exposed.

(b) Any tire on the front wheels of a bus, truck, or truck tractor shall have a tread groove pattern depth of at least 4/32 of an inch when measured at any point on a major tread groove. The measurements shall not be made where tie bars, humps, or fillets are located.

(c) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, tires shall have a tread groove pattern depth of at least 2/32 of an inch when measured in a major tread groove. The measurement shall not be made where tie bars, humps or fillets are located.

(d) No bus shall be operated with regrooved, recapped or retreaded tires on the front wheels.

(e) A regrooved tire with a load-carrying capacity equal to or greater than 2,232 kg (4,920 pounds) shall not be used on the front wheels of any truck or truck tractor.

 
 Jack
Logged

Jack Hart, CDS
1956 GMC PD-4501 #945 (The Mighty SCENICRUISER!)
8V71 Detroit
4 speed Spicer Trannsmission
Hickory, NC, (Where a call to God is a local call!)
circusboy90210
Chat Banned
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 271





Ignore
« Reply #24 on: March 11, 2009, 05:37:19 PM »

being assembled here does not make it an american product. ... where does  the profit go? who designs them? where does the raw material come from? who owns the company? ( I drove the pres of michelin and his enterage.. many times in las vegas. big clue here ... he's french.)
Logged
Sean
Geek.
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2553


'85 Neoplan Spaceliner "Odyssey"


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #25 on: March 11, 2009, 06:33:18 PM »

being assembled here does not make it an american product. ... where does  the profit go? who designs them? where does the raw material come from? who owns the company? ( I drove the pres of michelin and his enterage.. many times in las vegas. big clue here ... he's french.)


Well, these factors apply equally to all tire companies, including the sole major American label, Goodyear.  All of these companies use the same suppliers for raw material, all have engineering branches in the US, and all are owned by stockholders, whose makeup is as global as the financial markets.  Goodyear is not really any more or less "US-owned" than Michelin or Bridgestone.  Michelin is 57% non-French owned (though their bylaws confer extra voting privileges on EU residents.)  These are public companies.

About the only thing you can say that makes Goodyear more an American company than Michelin is where its headquarters is located.  Both companies pay similar amounts (based on manufacturing and sales) of US tax, both have to answer to US regulators, both have to answer to US stockholders.  And in both cases, the "profit" goes to the shareholders.  You can buy Michelin stock just as easily as Goodyear stock.

If you think a greater share of Michelin profit should come to the US, rather than to, for example, the UAE or Saudi Arabia, then, by all means, increase your stake in the company, or convince your friends to do so.  But please, ranting here about how we should all only buy Goodyears (an inferior brand to Michelin, IMO) so that we are "buying American" is specious at best.

If Michelin pulled out of the US market today, on the basis, for example, of you (and whomever you could persuade to join you) getting legislation passed to ban them, or tariff them, or whatever, what you would succeed in doing is putting thousands of American workers who work in Michelin/Goodrich plants in the US out of work.  That would also decimate the tax base of those communities, and, of course, reduce consumer choice in tire brands.  How, pray tell, would this make the world a better place?

Do you refuse to stay at Motel 6 because it is owned by the French?  Do you not own or watch a TV because all the brands are overseas companies?  How about the computer you are reading this on?  What if I told you that the vast majority of the equipment that makes up the Internet is made overseas, in many cases by "foreign" companies?  Would you stop using it?  Detroit Diesel is owned by a German company -- should we all swap our engines for Caterpillars?  Oh, wait, they pulled out of the highway market.

I am sure it's convenient for you to tell me how I should spend my tire budget based on your personal political convictions.  I note, however, that when you had the chance to make a bold statement at your own expense, you chose naked international capitalism:  you accepted the job of chauffeuring Michelin executives, presumably at corporate expense, rather than to assert your convictions by refusing the assignment.

Look, I am all for keeping manufacturing (and other kinds of) jobs right here in the US.  But denying the existence of a global economy and failing to be competitive in that economy is not the path to achieving that.  And so went Firestone, Goodrich, and a host of others.  Better to have been bought by international conglomerates and kept the US factories open, than to simply have gone out of business and shuttered them.

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
Logged

Full-timing in a 1985 Neoplan Spaceliner since 2004.
Our blog: http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
Paladin
Dave Knight
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 711





Ignore
« Reply #26 on: March 11, 2009, 06:35:56 PM »

Can I ask what the origin of manufacture has to do with whether or not a particular tire is a good deal or a safe one? I think it's long been established that at least a handful of people in here have no troubles with the imports as far as safety or reliability.
As far as I'm concerned I buy American where I can but I'll be damned if I'm going to spend more for it or get an inferior product just so I can wave the flag. Let's not be too radical or stupid here, it is stupid to pay more and\or get less just because it's built in Kansas or something.

What I'm saying is that this is a whole other off topic conversation and another thread......the old buy American or you're a dirty rotten commie and the McCarthy panel is gonna get you routine.
Logged

'75 MC-8   'Event Horizon'
8V71  HT740
Salt Lake City, Utah

"Have bus will travel read the card of the man, a Knight without armor in a savage land...."
circusboy90210
Chat Banned
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 271





Ignore
« Reply #27 on: March 12, 2009, 01:15:02 PM »

I would spend more for an American product because usually more times than not it's worth it. Also I support my fellow country' mans working wages by not purchasing foreign goods hence debasing our own wages by making them seem too expensive when it's the foreign worker who works for penauts. usually more times than not you get what you pay for in quality. Why do you think china has been equated with crap for eons. However I do ride a rice rocket as it's just a better product, I drive an American full size car (read normal.) If America would build a sport bike that could compete I would buy one. however in most other areas bang for the buck most American products are stil A#1.. I do'nt stay in anything other than crown plaza, homewood suites, hilton, and sometimes holiday inn. as far as major brand names.  Cool
Logged
Paladin
Dave Knight
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 711





Ignore
« Reply #28 on: March 12, 2009, 02:04:33 PM »

Again, off topic and has nothing at all to do with the thread but hey, it's an opportunity to grandstand right?

Logged

'75 MC-8   'Event Horizon'
8V71  HT740
Salt Lake City, Utah

"Have bus will travel read the card of the man, a Knight without armor in a savage land...."
John316
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3251

MCI 1995 DL3, DD S60, Allison B500.




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: March 12, 2009, 02:10:04 PM »

however in most other areas bang for the buck most American products are stil A#1..

Except for cars. Granted some American cars can last a while, but Japanese cars usually last much better. I used to work for a company that provided vehicle service contracts (vsc). The Japanese cars were the cheapest to get a vsc for because statistically they were MUCH more reliable. The American cars usually were much more expensive because they usually didn't have as good reliability. (I am not saying here that American cars are bad, I just bought a GMC truck because the price was right. I am just saying that American cars aren't as good as Japanese cars.)

I am just stating facts, not my opinion. What I said above was info from a national company, that a lot of dealers used for their vsc...

God bless,

John
Logged

MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
Sean
Geek.
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2553


'85 Neoplan Spaceliner "Odyssey"


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #30 on: March 12, 2009, 05:13:22 PM »

I would spend more for an American product because usually more times than not it's worth it. Also I support my fellow country' mans working wages by not purchasing foreign goods ...


Then, with respect to tires specifically (to try to bring this back somewhat closer to topic), I suggest you (and anyone else here with similar aim) are best served by checking the manufacturer's code on any tire you buy, and check to see that it is made in a U.S. plant.  That will get you much closer to your goal than "brand" shopping.

The two characters after "DOT" on the tire are the code for the plant of manufacture.  Look up the plant on one of these lists:
http://www.tireaccidents.com/tire_plant_codes.htm
http://www.tirebusiness.com/subscriber/databook/tirecodes.html

Quote
... However I do ride a rice rocket ...


Put your money where your mouth is:

The Honda GL1800 is made in Ohio, at least until later this year.  Hard to find a more capable motorcycle.  The Kawasaki Concours, another very capable machine, along with other models are built in Lincoln, Nebraska.  Many Kawasaki engines are made in Maryville, Missouri.  Buell and, of course, Harley Davidson motorcycles are made here, along with Victory (Polaris) and American Eagle.

All of these motorcycles have approximately the same foreign content (yes, even Harley).

Quote
... as it's just a better product ...


But it's not OK in this thread for Michelin to be "just a better product" than Goodyear?  Sauce for the goose...


-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
Logged

Full-timing in a 1985 Neoplan Spaceliner since 2004.
Our blog: http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
Len Silva
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4086


Angle Parked in a Parallel Universe


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #31 on: March 12, 2009, 05:39:44 PM »

I agree that this should probably go OT, but I am enjoying it none the less.
Going back a hundred years or so, German and Swiss were admired for their superiority in engineering.  Swiss watches, German optics were the best in the world. During the industrial revolution, America came into it's own, primarily developing better, faster, more accurate methods of production and led the world for many years.

After the war, Japanese products came to America and most were junk.  I had a 65 Toyota Corona (I think) that was a POS. Later a 74 Datsun that was marginal at best.  Since that time, Japanese products of all kinds have come to mean the best in quality and value.

When Korea started sending cars over here, they were the butt of many jokes.  That is no longer the case, Hyundi and Kia are pretty well respected these days.

The Chinese are only a few years behind and will become major players in manufacturing as America falls further and further behind. 

Until we place a MUCH higher value on education and the value of work, it's only going to get worse.
Logged


Hand Made Gifts

Ignorance is only bliss to the ignorant.
circusboy90210
Chat Banned
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 271





Ignore
« Reply #32 on: March 12, 2009, 07:57:54 PM »

I agree sean and the post before. yes Edumacation are difeenlanty wrose in this country than could be. The current air of entertainment tends to undermind the achievements of education. American's have mostly been good at being mediocre but making more of it such as the sherman tank. the panzer was a bettter tank we just overran it with superior numbers. but bang for the buck I would rather have a lincoln town car than a honda accord any day.  even an accura for style room, etc.... Mercedes ride to rough and are no American.  Yes Americn standards have been slipping, but alot of this has to do with blaming the worker for the expense of operation when in acutality even at high rates of pay like uaw , this is nothing to the overall cost of the vehicle... the shareholders are demanding way too much return. remember a company has 3 customers... the consumer , the worker and the shareholder......none should have total precidence over the other except for maybe the consumer.. blah blah new topic needed hahahaha Roll Eyes
Logged
Slow Rider
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 669




« Reply #33 on: March 16, 2009, 08:45:14 AM »

To add a comment to Seans, there is only one brand of motorcycle that can wear a "Made in the USA" label and it is not Harley.

Any guesses?

Frank
Logged

The MCI has landed..... We are home.
Dale City Va.  Just a southern suburb of DC
Yes I am a BUSNUT
1976 MCI MC8
rv_safetyman
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2199


Jim Shepherd


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #34 on: March 16, 2009, 09:43:29 AM »

Polaris Victory.  I got to work on that project when I worked for Gates.

Also got to work on the Excelsior-Henderson project (http://www.motorcyclecruiser.com/roadtests/1999_excelsior_henderson_super_x_motorcycle/index.html).  The Hanlon brothers tried their best to get another US bike going, but just could not make it in a rather crowded market.

This thread has sure progressed over a twisted path, but at least it has risen above the direction it was taking. 

BTW Sean, I really appreciated your posts.  Spot on as usual.
Logged

Jim Shepherd
Evergreen, CO
’85 Eagle 10/Series 60/Eaton AutoShift 10 speed transmission
Somewhere between a tin tent and a finished product
Bus Project details: http://beltguy.com/Bus_Project/busproject.htm
Blog:  http://rvsafetyman.blogspot.com/
Ednj
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 997


Ed & Sue Skiba




Ignore
« Reply #35 on: March 16, 2009, 10:01:23 AM »

To add a comment to Seans, there is only one brand of motorcycle that can wear a "Made in the USA" label and it is not Harley.

Any guesses?

Frank
>
Very tricky Frank.
ATK Shocked

Here's your tire's
Logged

MCI-9
Sussex county, Delaware.
See my picture's at= http://groups.yahoo.com/group/busshellconverters/
That's Not Oil Dripping under my Bus, It's Sweat from all that Horsepower.
----- This space for rent. -----
rv_safetyman
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2199


Jim Shepherd


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #36 on: March 16, 2009, 10:36:06 AM »

One more comment on American motorcycle products.  The Polaris project leader was a Brit who brought Triumph back to life.  I know that Polaris sources some of their  parts off shore like everyone else. 

Concerning the rear belt drive, about the time I was leaving Gates, Polaris came back to us (had gone to Dayco with less that great results) and wanted us to help them make the conversion to our PolyChain belt.  They wanted to source the rear sprocket out to a Chinese company.  There was some licensing issues since our tooth profile was proprietary.  Not sure how that all worked out.

Excelsior-Henderson was outsourcing the engines from the UK as I recall.

As has been pointed out, HD has significant off-shore content. 

Bottom line, as has been previously stated, it is hard to name a product that does not have off-shore content.

Jim
« Last Edit: March 16, 2009, 10:39:36 AM by rv_safetyman » Logged

Jim Shepherd
Evergreen, CO
’85 Eagle 10/Series 60/Eaton AutoShift 10 speed transmission
Somewhere between a tin tent and a finished product
Bus Project details: http://beltguy.com/Bus_Project/busproject.htm
Blog:  http://rvsafetyman.blogspot.com/
junkman42
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 452





Ignore
« Reply #37 on: March 16, 2009, 11:04:14 AM »

Yes I know OT, I will post a picture of My 1942 Harley WLA and at the ripe old age of 67 or so a quick battery charge, a field flash and fresh gas and it will run.  Although a tank shift at least it is on the proper side.  Oh did I mention it belonged to the us army in the Philippines and very possibly was used by the Japanese troops.  It was purchased in the early 50's by a Philippine citizen and then bought by a us army officer after Mt Pinatubo blew up!  All American and still very usable if You can stand the lack of rear springs or suspension.  It is raining so I had to blog.  Sorry,regards John
Logged
uncle ned
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 929



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #38 on: March 16, 2009, 12:14:58 PM »



   I have a pair of Indian Velloccett Thruxtons   by Floyd Clymer.  One is titled and the other is still in a crate.

I bought them from Southeast Indian  after they declared bankrupcy in 19 71.

and a bunch of old british bikes but ended up riding a 72 750 honda  because of the "button" electric starter.

also have a lot f dirt bikes the latest one are ktm and husaberg.

uncle ned
Logged

4104's forever
6v92 v730
Huggy Bear
Pages: 1 2 3 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!