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Author Topic: Used Michelin: are these decent deal?  (Read 5215 times)
Sean
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« Reply #30 on: March 12, 2009, 05:13:22 PM »

I would spend more for an American product because usually more times than not it's worth it. Also I support my fellow country' mans working wages by not purchasing foreign goods ...


Then, with respect to tires specifically (to try to bring this back somewhat closer to topic), I suggest you (and anyone else here with similar aim) are best served by checking the manufacturer's code on any tire you buy, and check to see that it is made in a U.S. plant.  That will get you much closer to your goal than "brand" shopping.

The two characters after "DOT" on the tire are the code for the plant of manufacture.  Look up the plant on one of these lists:
http://www.tireaccidents.com/tire_plant_codes.htm
http://www.tirebusiness.com/subscriber/databook/tirecodes.html

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... However I do ride a rice rocket ...


Put your money where your mouth is:

The Honda GL1800 is made in Ohio, at least until later this year.  Hard to find a more capable motorcycle.  The Kawasaki Concours, another very capable machine, along with other models are built in Lincoln, Nebraska.  Many Kawasaki engines are made in Maryville, Missouri.  Buell and, of course, Harley Davidson motorcycles are made here, along with Victory (Polaris) and American Eagle.

All of these motorcycles have approximately the same foreign content (yes, even Harley).

Quote
... as it's just a better product ...


But it's not OK in this thread for Michelin to be "just a better product" than Goodyear?  Sauce for the goose...


-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
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Full-timing in a 1985 Neoplan Spaceliner since 2004.
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Len Silva
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« Reply #31 on: March 12, 2009, 05:39:44 PM »

I agree that this should probably go OT, but I am enjoying it none the less.
Going back a hundred years or so, German and Swiss were admired for their superiority in engineering.  Swiss watches, German optics were the best in the world. During the industrial revolution, America came into it's own, primarily developing better, faster, more accurate methods of production and led the world for many years.

After the war, Japanese products came to America and most were junk.  I had a 65 Toyota Corona (I think) that was a POS. Later a 74 Datsun that was marginal at best.  Since that time, Japanese products of all kinds have come to mean the best in quality and value.

When Korea started sending cars over here, they were the butt of many jokes.  That is no longer the case, Hyundi and Kia are pretty well respected these days.

The Chinese are only a few years behind and will become major players in manufacturing as America falls further and further behind. 

Until we place a MUCH higher value on education and the value of work, it's only going to get worse.
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circusboy90210
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« Reply #32 on: March 12, 2009, 07:57:54 PM »

I agree sean and the post before. yes Edumacation are difeenlanty wrose in this country than could be. The current air of entertainment tends to undermind the achievements of education. American's have mostly been good at being mediocre but making more of it such as the sherman tank. the panzer was a bettter tank we just overran it with superior numbers. but bang for the buck I would rather have a lincoln town car than a honda accord any day.  even an accura for style room, etc.... Mercedes ride to rough and are no American.  Yes Americn standards have been slipping, but alot of this has to do with blaming the worker for the expense of operation when in acutality even at high rates of pay like uaw , this is nothing to the overall cost of the vehicle... the shareholders are demanding way too much return. remember a company has 3 customers... the consumer , the worker and the shareholder......none should have total precidence over the other except for maybe the consumer.. blah blah new topic needed hahahaha Roll Eyes
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Slow Rider
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« Reply #33 on: March 16, 2009, 08:45:14 AM »

To add a comment to Seans, there is only one brand of motorcycle that can wear a "Made in the USA" label and it is not Harley.

Any guesses?

Frank
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« Reply #34 on: March 16, 2009, 09:43:29 AM »

Polaris Victory.  I got to work on that project when I worked for Gates.

Also got to work on the Excelsior-Henderson project (http://www.motorcyclecruiser.com/roadtests/1999_excelsior_henderson_super_x_motorcycle/index.html).  The Hanlon brothers tried their best to get another US bike going, but just could not make it in a rather crowded market.

This thread has sure progressed over a twisted path, but at least it has risen above the direction it was taking. 

BTW Sean, I really appreciated your posts.  Spot on as usual.
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Jim Shepherd
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Ednj
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« Reply #35 on: March 16, 2009, 10:01:23 AM »

To add a comment to Seans, there is only one brand of motorcycle that can wear a "Made in the USA" label and it is not Harley.

Any guesses?

Frank
>
Very tricky Frank.
ATK Shocked

Here's your tire's
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MCI-9
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rv_safetyman
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« Reply #36 on: March 16, 2009, 10:36:06 AM »

One more comment on American motorcycle products.  The Polaris project leader was a Brit who brought Triumph back to life.  I know that Polaris sources some of their  parts off shore like everyone else. 

Concerning the rear belt drive, about the time I was leaving Gates, Polaris came back to us (had gone to Dayco with less that great results) and wanted us to help them make the conversion to our PolyChain belt.  They wanted to source the rear sprocket out to a Chinese company.  There was some licensing issues since our tooth profile was proprietary.  Not sure how that all worked out.

Excelsior-Henderson was outsourcing the engines from the UK as I recall.

As has been pointed out, HD has significant off-shore content. 

Bottom line, as has been previously stated, it is hard to name a product that does not have off-shore content.

Jim
« Last Edit: March 16, 2009, 10:39:36 AM by rv_safetyman » Logged

Jim Shepherd
Evergreen, CO
’85 Eagle 10/Series 60/Eaton AutoShift 10 speed transmission
Somewhere between a tin tent and a finished product
Bus Project details: http://beltguy.com/Bus_Project/busproject.htm
Blog:  http://rvsafetyman.blogspot.com/
junkman42
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« Reply #37 on: March 16, 2009, 11:04:14 AM »

Yes I know OT, I will post a picture of My 1942 Harley WLA and at the ripe old age of 67 or so a quick battery charge, a field flash and fresh gas and it will run.  Although a tank shift at least it is on the proper side.  Oh did I mention it belonged to the us army in the Philippines and very possibly was used by the Japanese troops.  It was purchased in the early 50's by a Philippine citizen and then bought by a us army officer after Mt Pinatubo blew up!  All American and still very usable if You can stand the lack of rear springs or suspension.  It is raining so I had to blog.  Sorry,regards John
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uncle ned
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« Reply #38 on: March 16, 2009, 12:14:58 PM »



   I have a pair of Indian Velloccett Thruxtons   by Floyd Clymer.  One is titled and the other is still in a crate.

I bought them from Southeast Indian  after they declared bankrupcy in 19 71.

and a bunch of old british bikes but ended up riding a 72 750 honda  because of the "button" electric starter.

also have a lot f dirt bikes the latest one are ktm and husaberg.

uncle ned
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