Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
October 23, 2014, 04:40:33 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If your computer is lost, damaged, or stolen, your Online mags will be safe.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Any tips for welding on my fuel tank?  (Read 6248 times)
wrench
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 166





Ignore
« Reply #15 on: March 18, 2009, 03:42:40 AM »

Little leary about asking after the last welding question I had but here it goes. I am going to drill a hole in my fuel tank to accommidate a fuel pick up line , and then weld the nut it is attached to, to the fuel tank. I will be using a vacuum and also be using plenty of grease on my drill bit and will be going slow. As for the welding I only have 1/4 tank of fuel and will be welding at approx. at the same level as the filler cap. Anything I should know. Do I leave my fuel cap open while I'm welding? etc
         HASTA LA VISTA AMIGO!!
  wrench
Logged
Chopper Scott
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1301


MCI 7




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: March 18, 2009, 05:25:54 AM »

Static electricity has caused quite a few injuries Jim. I had a friend get burned bad years ago when he began putting diesel into a metal 5 gallon can that had been used for gasoline. If you notice at gas pumps they require you to remove containers and place them on the ground before filling them. Later
Logged

Seven Heaven.... I pray a lot every time I head down the road!!
Bad decisions make good stories.
kyle4501
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3145


PD4501 South Carolina




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2009, 05:38:10 AM »

Welding metal together is easy.

KNOWING & UNDERSTANDING what is going on in the puddle & area around it is something else entirely.

In my work I see lots of 'professional' welders. Some are good & know what they're doing. Some, not so much.
Some think that they are experts since they can strike an arc.


If I HAD to have a fuel tank welded on, I'd hire it out (based on recommendations & past performance) & have them call me when they're finished. That way I avoid the risk to what is really important - me, myself & I.

Some things ain't worth the potential savings. . . .



Good luck in whatever path you take.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2009, 05:40:26 AM by kyle4501 » Logged

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. (R.M. Nixon)
Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
1989, MCI 102C3, 8V92T, HT740, 06' conversion FMCA# F-27317-S "Wife- 1969 Italian/German Style"
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4874


Nick & Michelle Badame


WWW
« Reply #18 on: March 18, 2009, 06:39:33 AM »

Hi Guy's,

I had a friend fabricate mine out of a block of aluminum.  It took him an hour to make it. Pretty simple.

I cut a 2 1/2" hole in my tank to recieve this 3 1/2" flange. Then I used a rubber gasket and 4 screws.

Good Luck
Nick-
Logged

Whatever it takes!-GITIT DONE! 
Commercial Refrigeration- Ice machines- Heating & Air/ Atlantic Custom Coach Inc.
Master Mason- Cannon Lodge #104
https://www.facebook.com/atlanticcustomcoach
www.atlanticcustomcoach.com
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12755




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2009, 06:51:08 AM »

If you don't feel safe about welding on the tank check with marine dealers for years when we relpaced a metal tank they had fitting with threads and a neoprene washer that you drilled a starter hole and screw the fitting with a screen filter and had threads for a pickup tube into any location on the tank.I don't know if living the plastic world if the fittings are still available now or not. For me it would be no problem to weld a fitting I would clean both parts good use acid and sliver solder works for me and has for years Good luck
« Last Edit: March 18, 2009, 07:07:47 AM by luvrbus » Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
busshawg
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 490





Ignore
« Reply #20 on: March 18, 2009, 08:20:37 AM »

well thanks once again for all of your imput, lots of good advice. I like the bulk head fitting idea. Same deal only less work and no welding.  I aso appreiciate all of you safety concerns about welding on a fuel tank.

Thank-you
Logged

Have Fun!!
Grant
Chopper Scott
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1301


MCI 7




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: March 18, 2009, 10:50:30 AM »

I like the bulk head route better myself also. It looks better and with vibrations and such a direct weld into the tank could eventually cause the tube to break at the weld. You won't have to worry when drilling except for any fillings getting into the tank. Later
Logged

Seven Heaven.... I pray a lot every time I head down the road!!
Bad decisions make good stories.
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!