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Author Topic: Best place to purchase wheel studs?  (Read 3533 times)
johns4104s
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« on: March 22, 2009, 02:13:55 PM »

While  removing the front wheel on my MCI 9. s I noticed that the nuts Only just covered the studs. In fact while removing the chrome nut cover one of the studs broke off. I guess whoever put them on tighten them so tight to make sure the wheel would not come off. I have aluminum rims so I would guess the studs would need to be longer.
Also how much should I pay for them? I guess I hammer them out, but is there a way to pull the new ones in with a air gun?

Thanks

John
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jackhartjr
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« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2009, 02:18:49 PM »

John...PLEASE torque them when you put them back on.
Are yours hub-pilot or stud-pilot.  The reason I asked is that a stud-pilot wheel needs 450 pounds of torque to get tight enough.  I have a torque muliplier for this reason...150 pounds on the torque wrench is 450 pounds muliplied the three times on the multiplier.
Jack
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luvrbus
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« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2009, 02:36:07 PM »

John, I buy my studs from Aetna Screw but most local Napa stores and truck parts can order them for you check http://www.aetnascrew.com for the size and parts number they will cost + or - $10.00 each and a press is the best way to remove and replace the studs.    good luck
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buswarrior
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« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2009, 07:27:29 PM »

I expect you are planning to replace them all?

If one is abused, they will all be abused.

Along with all the rest of the things we do, fresh tires, renewed suspensions, new compressor, re-built air driers, re-wired rats nests, re-built engines and transmissions, a fresh set of wheel fasteners is a great peace of mind.

And don't let anyone gun the nuts on EVER AGAIN. Tell them: proper torque, or get lost.

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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johns4104s
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« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2009, 11:01:23 AM »

Luvrbus,

Great input on the Press. I will probably have all studs to change on all the wheels. Do you know if they make a good priced portable press that will do the job?

Thanks

John
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johns4104s
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« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2009, 11:11:55 AM »

         
Do you think this press would puss those studs??

John
       


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NJT 5573
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« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2009, 11:41:23 AM »

John,

If you can get it set up, that's enough press. Steer studs are usually much heavier than axle studs. There is nothing wrong with replacing them all on both sides with longer studs, that's always a good idea...

If it were mine, I would inspect all the studs and if they looked OK, I would just change out the broken one. Beat it out and take it to the parts house and get a replacement. You should have right threads on the passenger side and lefts on the drivers side depending on how old your coach is.

The press is the right way, but I have changed alot of studs without one. The non approved method that I use is to put the new stud in the freezer for awhile, grease it and the hub up and pull it through with the tire gun. I use an extra large nut for a spacer when needed to seat the stud and that is important or the nut will work lose.

DOT allows broken studs. You are "in service" with 2 broken studs out of 10 as long as they are not side by side. You are "out of service" if they are side by side. You are "in service" if any thread shows with the nut pulled down, "out of service" if no thread or negative thread.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2009, 12:02:45 PM by NJT 5573 » Logged

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johns4104s
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« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2009, 01:13:05 PM »

NJT,

Thanks

My front passenger side has no threads on the stud showing, there is a taper, you can see the stud inside the nut( stud is  barley  level with the stud) someone put aluminum wheels on without changing two longer studs.

John
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HighTechRedneck
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« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2009, 08:57:54 PM »

It sounds to me like you do need to change to longer studs anyway.  But if replacing damaged ones, the manual for my bus advises changing the studs each side of it as well.  It cites that if one is damaged, the adjacent ones may have carried too much load and have stress damage.
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NJT 5573
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« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2009, 09:34:06 AM »

John,

I think whats going on here is an issue that is common with left hand studs. Some fool puts a tire gun on a stud and hammers away and the stud won't come off because he is turning it the wrong way. A few months or years later, it just gives up.
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"Ammo Warrior" Keepers Of The Peace, Creators Of Destruction.
Gold is the money of Kings, Silver is the money of Gentlemen, Barter is the money of Peasants, Debt is the money of Slaves.

$1M in $1000 bills = 8 inches high.
$1B in $1000 bills = 800 feet high.
$1T in $1000 bills = 142 miles high
John316
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« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2009, 01:20:22 PM »

One big bus company that I talked with, said never use bigger than a half inch gun on you tires. He said that they would have broken studs all the time (and yes the torqued all lugs very carefully) when they would use their one inch guns on them. They changed to using half only, and problem solved. I think that the wrench turners were just ramming the nuts as hard as they could, onto the studs, and then "torquing" them afterward. But the damage had been done already.

I took his advice, and I ever have a tire shop work on the tires, I am right there making sure that they don't over tighten them, and that when they torque them they are still turning it some, not that it has been tightened all of the way already.

I got a IR Thundergun for Christmas, and I love it. That little thing has so much power. It can break my lugs loose, and tighten them back on perfectly, so I can torque them the rest of the way...

YMMV

God bless,

John
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MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
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