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Author Topic: warning  (Read 2776 times)
FloridaCliff
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« Reply #15 on: April 16, 2009, 03:25:49 PM »

BH,

Never too late for a reminder on being safe!

Whenever I am in a hurry, thats when or if something happens.

The one great thing about getting older is I have a lot more patience than when I was younger.

Of course its still short when compared to most........ Wink

Cliff
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circusboy90210
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« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2009, 04:30:02 PM »

wow insurance companies should be in force to help propagate this saw technology. I was truly amazed. wonder if current saw's could be retrofitted with this tech?
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poppi
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« Reply #17 on: April 16, 2009, 05:09:50 PM »


 Do realize when the mechanism is tripped you will need to get a new saw blade.

 Small price to pay.


   Skip
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cody
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« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2009, 05:31:10 PM »

Yep the braking action destroys the blade by jamming a whole lot of solid metal into it to stop it like right now but again, have you ever seen a hand for sale at home depot?  lol
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larryc
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« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2009, 05:58:20 PM »

wow insurance companies should be in force to help propagate this saw technology. I was truly amazed. wonder if current saw's could be retrofitted with this tech?

There was a big bruhaha about this when the inventor first came up with the idea about 5 years ago and tried to sell the system to existing manufacturers but no one would buy it.
He didn't make many friends when he tried to get legislation passed that would require this safety feature.
No one took him up on the licensing so he went into the manufacturing business and not only came up with a very safe saw but also one of the best built saws in the industry. Just about every school district is requiring this saw and many woodworking shops that have employees are also going to the safer saw (lower workman's comp insurance)
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Hartley
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« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2009, 06:45:32 PM »

I had 2 shop teachers in school that had missing or partially damaged hands.

Seemed like it was a requirement.

My grandfather ( the carpenter ) was missing part of his thumb.. Table saw
of the 1940's vintage with a huge belt driven blade... I watched him trim
another finger one day. He just cussed and wrapped a handkerchief around
his hand and continued sawing...

I have come close a few times.. I stuck a screwdriver through my hand one night when I worked for the mouse. Got some superglue filled the hole and went back to work.

When I was a kid, I tried to open a bottle of testors model paint with my right hand and a vise... I was holding the glass part.. Still have that scar most of the way around my index finger too!!! A little electrical tape courtesy of POP and I was good to go...

I later graduated to duct tape and paper towels.. Still find the need to hurt myself too!

Oh.. " No Job is completely done until you have BLED on it properly! "
« Last Edit: April 16, 2009, 06:47:10 PM by DrDave-Reloaded » Logged

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buswarrior
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« Reply #21 on: April 16, 2009, 08:00:47 PM »

Yup, you gotta bleed on it, or break something.

All goes well?

Be afraid, be very afraid....

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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poppi
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« Reply #22 on: April 17, 2009, 07:17:04 AM »


   Even a helper needs to be warned on safety issues.

 Just this week my helper (the better half) tried to help me when I was cutting tile for a new floor in a bedroom.
 I have a small table saw style tile saw and was cutting a piece of tile and out of the blue she reached over and
 grabbed one end of the tile. yes I did raise my voice with a stearn NO. She looked over sheepishly and "I was just trying to help"
 
  Note to self..............in a calm time I need to explain to her not to help (unless asked) when someone is sawing something.
  If it had been a wood table saw it could have been Oops

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zubzub
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« Reply #23 on: April 17, 2009, 07:43:36 AM »

The problem is every time the subject of work accidents comes up I remember that horrible day 7 years ago......when I shot a brad nail into my crotch.

I had a new guy working with me and we were re-installing cabinets.  The cabs were being difficult and I got myself into a situation were I wanted to shoot a few 2" spikes into something to hold it for a bit.  Problem was  I had the 18 gage nailer and I wanted 16 gage, so I told my assistant to change guns.  Well my 16 gage nailer's air nipple was a little worn and buddy was having trouble connecting it to the air line, so a little impatient ( I was holding up a wall cab) I told him to pass it to me. I somehow twisted around and holding the cab with my shoulder I put the air line on the gun....but somehow in all this I had the tip pointed to my crotch and as I attached the air line maybe my tool belt flicked the trigger and I heard the gun shoot a nail. . .  .    .      .



Well all of sudden I wasn't holding the cab anymore.  My first thought was "how bad could it be?" I already have a child and I wasn't planning on having another.  So right in the middle of the kitchen I took down my pants to have a look.  This was maybe the new guy's 2nd day on the job and he may have been thinking "this is more than I  signed on for".  SO there I am pants around my knees looking at my crotch and I see the nail and it has pinned my scrotum to my leg.  It only went about a 1/2" into my leg and it had missed the contents but it had neatly tacked my sac.  So I asked buddy to pass me the needle nose pliers (which he did a good job of) and before the pain/fear could set in I pulled it out.  All seemed fine a few drops of blood and back to work.  Checked again a half hour later one more drop of blood and that was it.
 Guess I'm both lucky and stupid sometimes.  Considering I always make every one wear safety gear, and harp on about safety all the time, never shoot a nailer when my hand is where u`-turn could bring the nail back, etc etc etc this was really a low point in stupid for me, but it still makes me laugh and there's another little one due in the next 2 weeks.
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JackConrad
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« Reply #24 on: April 17, 2009, 08:27:50 AM »

The problem is every time the subject of work accidents comes up I remember that horrible day 7 years ago......when I shot a brad nail into my crotch.
I had a new guy working with me and we were re-installing cabinets.  The cabs were being difficult and I got myself into a situation were I wanted to shoot a few 2" spikes into something to hold it for a bit.  Problem was  I had the 18 gage nailer and I wanted 16 gage, so I told my assistant to change guns.  Well my 16 gage nailer's air nipple was a little worn and buddy was having trouble connecting it to the air line, so a little impatient ( I was holding up a wall cab) I told him to pass it to me. I somehow twisted around and holding the cab with my shoulder I put the air line on the gun....but somehow in all this I had the tip pointed to my crotch and as I attached the air line maybe my tool belt flicked the trigger and I heard the gun shoot a nail. . .  .    .      .
Well all of sudden I wasn't holding the cab anymore.  My first thought was "how bad could it be?" I already have a child and I wasn't planning on having another.  So right in the middle of the kitchen I took down my pants to have a look.  This was maybe the new guy's 2nd day on the job and he may have been thinking "this is more than I  signed on for".  SO there I am pants around my knees looking at my crotch and I see the nail and it has pinned my scrotum to my leg.  It only went about a 1/2" into my leg and it had missed the contents but it had neatly tacked my sac.  So I asked buddy to pass me the needle nose pliers (which he did a good job of) and before the pain/fear could set in I pulled it out.  All seemed fine a few drops of blood and back to work.  Checked again a half hour later one more drop of blood and that was it.
 Guess I'm both lucky and stupid sometimes.  Considering I always make every one wear safety gear, and harp on about safety all the time, never shoot a nailer when my hand is where u`-turn could bring the nail back, etc etc etc this was really a low point in stupid for me, but it still makes me laugh and there's another little one due in the next 2 weeks.

Many years ago, I was working with my Dad, building a garage (Dad was a contractor). First thing in the morning, he reached down, pick up the Skil saw and started to cut a board. He got a electrical shock when he squeezed the trigger. As he jerked from the shock, he let loose of the saw which went across his groin. He dropped his trousers to find the blade had cut through his trousers and underwear, but only put a very small scratch on him.  He grabbed another saw and we went back to work. At noon, while driving home for lunch ( we were building this garage about 3 miles from our house), he got to thinking about just how close that was. By the time we got home, he was so weak and pale, Mom and I had to help him out of the truck. We took the rest of the day off.  Jack
« Last Edit: April 17, 2009, 06:01:25 PM by JackConrad » Logged

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« Reply #25 on: April 17, 2009, 10:22:50 AM »

Was watching one of those "Real ER" shows last year some time.  There was this guy who had come into the ER because he had removed a digit with a table saw.  The Dr. was trying to deal with multiple serious patients so he made sure that the bleeding was under control and called the ortho surgeon to come down.  Then, he went about working on more critical patients.

Apparently, the ortho surgeon was busy so it was taking a bit of time.  The guy with the missing finger was starting to get agitated about the wait.  The ER doc kept trying to calm him down and explained to him that he had called the ortho surgeon down to consult. The guy says "Why can't you just stitch it closed and let me go like they did last year?"  The Dr. did a double-take and said, "Last year?!?" 

The guy holds up the opposite hand and, sure enough same digit missing!  The doc asked him how that one had happened.  Sure enough...same saw.  Doh!
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