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Author Topic: marbling over a floor or, don't take it for granite lol  (Read 4032 times)
cody
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« Reply #15 on: May 21, 2009, 06:44:39 PM »

You've come to the right board then, you'll learn a lot here, we have some VERY knowledgable people, we're not just a bunch of coach drivers lol.
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Blacksheep
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« Reply #16 on: May 21, 2009, 07:01:36 PM »

I wouldn't call it criticizing. More like correcting the facts!

As for doing it in less than and hour? If you notice I was using my blackberry while at dinner. I just couldn't let what I know to be true facts over what you have stated, to be told.

As professional converters go? I wouldn't bank on them doing a million dollar job just because they have a big name with big money being spent. Go to some of the RV shows and check out the less than shotty workmanship! Most of what you pay for in spending the big bucks is cosmetic. They tend to cover up just about everything with anything they can.

Using 12 inch tile went out in the late 70's early 80's,  I think and if this was a recent conversion say from the mid 90's, then they were just taking your money! One they were using too small a tile, two, they didn't know how to fix an obvious problem that THEY created. It isn't the bus, sub floor, or the material's fault. It was they who sold it and installed it by not knowing what they were doing OR working with.
One golden rule I learned a LONG time ago was, do not attempt to install  a piece of material, ANY material, if you DON'T know what your doing with it, AND most importantly, if you DON'T know how to correct it IF there IS a problem.  I see way too many times where people THINK they can do it themselves only because someone at HD told them it was easy. A lot of those people that work there couldn't cut it in the real world out in the field. Wonder why?

I also used to do work for a really well known company where the owners were NEVER on their knees but knew it all! I call them both "BOOK SMART" and not "FIELD SMART". I had to literally take them out many times to actually show them HOW it's done in the field to make them believers!

By the way, "Flex-Bond" would have been my choice over hardy board using even your 12 inch tile layed on a 45. I bet many many miles with no breaks!

Ace
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buswarrior
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« Reply #17 on: May 21, 2009, 07:02:08 PM »

BINGO!!

He shows himself!

T-man, I mean, not our resident Ace.

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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Frozen North, Greater Toronto Area
cody
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« Reply #18 on: May 21, 2009, 07:06:29 PM »

lol, I'll stick with the ones here on the board that I know and trust and that have proven their expertice over time here.
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Blacksheep
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« Reply #19 on: May 21, 2009, 08:35:07 PM »

BW was I just slammed or was that compliment?  Huh

Ace
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cody
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« Reply #20 on: May 21, 2009, 08:43:44 PM »

lol you weren't slammed ace, not in the least.
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buswarrior
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« Reply #21 on: May 21, 2009, 08:45:19 PM »

Compliment. You posted when I did.

tovinman is no friend of the busnut.

He has history elsewhere, his posts will continue to reveal him as of no assistance to us.

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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luvrbus
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« Reply #22 on: May 21, 2009, 09:32:29 PM »

Cody,I have always had a problem with my marble floors cracking they have been redone 2 times.I noticed today I had 2 broke tiles.
Fwiw I am changing to bamboo flooring good luck on this one and watch the levers when you install those they will twist and crack the marble in our beloved Eagles
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JackConrad
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« Reply #23 on: May 22, 2009, 05:44:41 AM »

    Our ceramic tile has been in now for about 7 years and no cracks (I guess someone forgot to tell it that it is supposed to crack). I think the tile are about 14 or 15" square laid at a 45 degree angle (thanks again Ace).
   It was installed over a layer of 1/4" Luan that was glued & screwed to the new 3/4" T&G plywood (also glued & screwed) that replaced the OEM flooring. the tile was installed using thinset that was mixed using latex admixture instead of water.
   Actually, we have had one tile crack. That tile is on the bottom step in the stepwell and the electric step is attached to the bottom of this step. I think a heavy person stepping on the electric step, causes the bottom step to flex and thus cracked this tile. Jack
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« Reply #24 on: May 22, 2009, 05:56:21 AM »

Jack, my tile in the bathroom has never cracked but it has grout line and the marble doesn't     good luck
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bottomacher
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« Reply #25 on: May 22, 2009, 06:10:48 AM »

Jack, your comment really surprises me. Lauan plywood is generally used for vinyl tile that doesn't require a lot of water in the curing process, unlike thinset and grout. The problem that arises is delamination of the plies due to non-waterproof glue. The comment above about 11 ply Baltic birch also raised in my mind the question of interior glue, which is the only kind I have personally encountered with Baltic plywood, normally intedned for interior use. There is recently a supply of "waterproof" Lauan plywood, but I have not used it for a damp application. I have always used at least 4 ply 1/2" exterior plywood as tile underlayment and haven't had a problem to date. I have also had better results with mastic and smaller tile and latex modified grout for floors that are subject to flexing. FWIW and YMMV.
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cody
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« Reply #26 on: May 22, 2009, 06:12:25 AM »

I've gone my usual route with massive overkill according to libby, but hopefully it'll be ok, I used a vinyl based thinset for the adhesive and set the marble with 1/8th inch grout lines, for that I'm using an unsanded grout, again with a vinyl base.  A friend that set tile for a living until his retirement from an 8 hour day a few years ago that now does the tileing for marathon kinda guided me along as I put the program together for this tile project, he recommended the use of the vinyl based products.  He seemed to feel that small voids under the tile was as detrimental to the life of the tile as much as flexing or vibration would be, hopefully it'll turn out ok, I've relied on some very knowledgable people to guide me on several projects both here on this board and off the board, it's amazes me what a wonderful cataloge of resources we acquire over the years and I trust these people, just as I trust the great majority of the members here to give solid and knowledgable information but as always I'll take a great deal of information and customize it to fit into the parameters of the project that I need to address.  Wow, that almost made me sound smart, I gotta show libby this post lol.
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bottomacher
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« Reply #27 on: May 22, 2009, 06:20:41 AM »

Grout lines don't have to be "grout." A good elastic caulk, such as Polyseamseal, can be used, as American-Olean did, and may help a cracking problem. The tiles can also be set with caulk as an adhesive.
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cody
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« Reply #28 on: May 22, 2009, 06:22:47 AM »

The 11 ply that I used is a throwback to my cabinetry, it is found not only in several grades but also for several applications, an interior variety is available and more commonly found but also an exterior grade, generally the exterior grade is primarily used for the enclosures of prograde speaker systems and extremely stable, the main reason for my choice of this particular variety is the total absence of bark related fillers, the ply fillers are veneer plys or lumber core and add to the stability of the plywood, a lot fo the available plywood that is readily found at places like home depot or lowes has a basic ground bark filler that regardless of the application tends to breakdown over time, I've relied on the  exterior 11 ply for cabinet interior casework, especially around any areas that could encounter moisture like sink bases or vanities, it's worked well for me over the years.
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poppi
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« Reply #29 on: May 22, 2009, 06:31:08 AM »

 Cody,
   I'm kinda curious..............

    What fun is it to do a job only once.........
     Where is the joy in knowing planned obsolescence can get you another chance
     to change things in the future Huh?


  Nice work Smiley

 Skip
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Snow disappeared......Now where did I put that bus?
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