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Author Topic: How do split one wire to several?  (Read 9464 times)
Dallas
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« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2009, 06:40:04 PM »

Thank you very much Paul. Now I have a reason to go to crimped only fittings.
I have spent my life as a mechanic using crimp and solder connections and have been told by many on this board that the solder connection is not good. No one could ever give me a reason why, just that it wasn't good.
Now I have the real reason to not do it... but... what do I do with the ones I already have with my 4/0 battery cables that have been there for about 56 years? should I replace them or just wait until they fail?
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belfert
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« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2009, 06:54:45 PM »

How often do insurance companies really deny fire claims?  If I hired a pro and he soldered a joint that later burns up my bus, is the insurance company really going to deny my claim?

Folks do stupid things that burn down homes on a pretty regular basis and we don't hear about the claims being denied.  Things like charcoal grills on wooden decks, grease fires, gas grills next to vinyl siding, and hot pans on wooden items amongst other stupid things.

Not saying I would solder joints in a bus.  I have pretty much used crimped joints for everything.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #17 on: May 24, 2009, 09:26:38 PM »

[quote author=belfert link=topic=12055.msg126446#msg126446 date=1243216485

Folks do stupid things that burn down homes on a pretty regular basis and we don't hear about the claims being denied.  Things like charcoal grills on wooden decks, grease fires, gas grills next to vinyl siding, and hot pans on wooden items amongst other stupid things.
[/quote]

You forgot deep frying a turkey.....preferably frozen. Grin Grin Mitch
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paul102a3
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« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2009, 05:05:58 AM »

Dallas, I would go with; if it isn't broke, don't fix it. I didn't want to imply that soldered wire connections won't work, only that a properly crimped connection will outlast and perform better than a solder connection.

In the marine industry, many older boats need to be surveyed every five years to maintain insurance coverage. A good Friend of mine had to cut off every factory installed soldered battery connection and replace them with crimped connections before the underwriter would renew his policy. His argument that the connections met all applicable wire codes when the boat was built was met with; find another insurance carrier.

The incident of a boat fire claim being denied was because the owner failed to follow ABYC guidelines and is detailed in a book entitled "The Nature of Boats".

I agree, people (myself included) do stupid things from time to time. Insurance underwriters do everything they can NOT to pay claims and there is a clause in my homeowners policy that says something like if a fire was a result of homeowners negligence, they are not required to pay the claim.

 
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« Reply #19 on: May 25, 2009, 05:52:41 AM »

Concerning corrosion:

I use dielectric grease on every connection, joint & bulb. It 's the greatest thing since sliced bread! Not only eliminates corrosion but makes changing bulbs a snap. Get a tube at your local auto supply store.

TOM
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Dallas
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« Reply #20 on: May 25, 2009, 07:06:25 AM »

No Problem Paul.

I will probably leave the existing connections as they are and switch to making good crimped connections as needed.
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Gary '79 5C
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« Reply #21 on: May 25, 2009, 09:02:33 AM »

Belfert,

Does your Dina, have a remote rear control station? or a rear terminal enclosure ?? I am guessing that you have the LED rear lights with pigtails, or just terminals within the enclosure.
I would suggest making the splices within the enclosure if at all possible, or if with pigtails I would try to make it to the rear control enclosure.

If all else fails, I would install a small terminal strip and use T&B stacons with forks to insert under the platen of the terminal strip. I know it is out in the ambient environment within the engine compartment, but still somewhat protected.

The reasoning is if you need to later shoot trouble and need to "break apart" the wires you can without undoing the multiple wires under one crimp.

ALL INPUT has very sound reasoning, but my experience leads me to the terminal strip. I would not worry about making it 100% weatherproof but better than nothing.

Dallas, I have seen ( that is lived long enough ) the solder method as a preferred solution. It alleviates the corrosion which can enter a properly crimped splice. There are many reasons to crimp over solder now adays, So I can go with the flow. I would imagine cold solder joints was the primary reason for the switch. Paul, I am sure you and your association has mucho more info than I which supports the position.

Everyone have a Great & Solemn Memorial Day.
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« Reply #22 on: May 25, 2009, 10:31:45 AM »

Mechanical crimped connections is the way to go.  However, there is much more to it than that.  The hand crimpers in the auto parts store will just not do the job.

You must use the correct connector, crimper and die for the application.  If you are using AMP connectors, you cannot use a T&B crimper and expect good results.  None of these parts are cheap but they are used in every industry with great reliability.

If you are using a hand crimper (vs air, hydraulic air electric powered) it must be the ratcheting type that insures you have applied the proper pressure before it will release.
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« Reply #23 on: May 25, 2009, 11:53:45 AM »

Belfert,

Does your Dina, have a remote rear control station? or a rear terminal enclosure ?? I am guessing that you have the LED rear lights with pigtails, or just terminals within the enclosure.
I would suggest making the splices within the enclosure if at all possible, or if with pigtails I would try to make it to the rear control enclosure.

I do not have any sort of rear electrical enclosure.  The rear lights are fed by a wiring harness coming all the way from the front to the rear.  In the rear there is a large (3" diameter) waterproof plug so the harness can be disconnected.  I haven't looked to see who makes the plug.

There reason I hear most often for not using solder is vibration.  Vibration supposedly can break the stranded wire where is is soldered.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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« Reply #24 on: May 25, 2009, 07:32:08 PM »

The worst corrosion I have found in old aircraft and vehicles including my 4104 has been at the soldered wiring terminals.
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