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Author Topic: drill bits  (Read 4542 times)
kingfa39
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« Reply #15 on: July 07, 2006, 08:31:18 AM »

hard t find good bits and when you do they dont stay that way, however when i went to the woodworking show a company called maddog tools has the bits , they are like 150.00 a set and probly around 14 or so bits, they are life time quaranteed, the put a 1/8 driil bit in and told me to try to break it, i bent it over 90 degees while into a peice of hard steel and could not , they reall work, they run em into concrete then into hard steel and they go ,never seen anything like it. if you ever breal one or it become dull they will replace it at no cost. go to the internet and look for Mad dog Tools
Frank Allen
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rwc
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« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2006, 06:07:14 AM »

I did a Google for Mad Dog Tools, Mad Dog drill bits and came up empty. Do you have a web site for them? Please post if you do I am keeping a file of resource places for future use. Thanks. Rod
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edvanland
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« Reply #17 on: July 08, 2006, 12:09:46 PM »

I have found that by using self tapping screws they do a better job.  What I do is use the self tapping screw and then go back if need be with a drill bit.  Self tapping screws are cheap.  I have used them on a lot of projects, not for rivetts, but it will be the same thing.
Works for me
ED
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Ed Van
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kingfa39
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« Reply #18 on: July 10, 2006, 07:44:04 AM »

sorry i made a mistake, it is bad dog tools:

 www.baddogtools.com

again sorry.
Frank Allen
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Frank, I corrected the link so it would open. You had a comma instead of a dot.
Richard
« Last Edit: July 10, 2006, 08:03:06 AM by DrivingMissLazy » Logged
littlehouse
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« Reply #19 on: July 10, 2006, 04:03:46 PM »

O K where do you go to buy this drill doc. in the south seattle area, what store or web cite. because i really need one or ten
or what ever.THANKS FOR ALL THE GREAT INFO.
ray with the littlehouse
« Last Edit: July 10, 2006, 04:19:51 PM by littlehouse » Logged

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Dallas
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« Reply #20 on: July 10, 2006, 04:19:25 PM »

Home Depot, Lowes, Menards, HQ,. Any of the larger box stores.
DO NOT BUY THE Smaller one, buy the largest you can possibly afford.

I've had 2,  The 350 and the 750. I sold both with lots of misgivings.

I just bought an XPK that makes split points, does the majority of bits up to 1/2" including masonry. It also allows you to vary the angle of the cut to grind from 118 to 135 that really helps with finding the right angle to cut dofferent metals.

Good Luck,

Dallas
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littlehouse
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« Reply #21 on: July 10, 2006, 04:22:44 PM »

Dallas
thanks alot! i'm out the door.

ray with the littlehouse
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Stan
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« Reply #22 on: July 10, 2006, 05:50:47 PM »

I am guessing that these drill bits are in the same category as the salad makers at the shows. I follow two machinist's bulletin boards and no one has ever mentioned them when answering queries on drill bits. I have never heard of any kind of metal soft enough to bend 90* and be hard enough to cut steel.  The only bits that will cut both concrete and steel are carbide tipped bits that you can buy as masonary bits cheaply in any hardware store. Even those need to ground to different angles with different relief for the different materials.

Lots of cheap (.20/each) import bits from machine tool suppliers will cut fine and last a long time if you have the right speed, the right pressure, the correct size of pilot hole, and the correct lubricant. Hard steel is almost impossible to dril with a portable drill whereas leaded steel is like drilling aluminulm and you can't tell the difference by looking at it. When the demonstrators drill holes in old spring leaves, you don't know if it has been annealed and is very easy to drill.

For the average non professional, a medium quality ($1.25/each for 1/4")  from a brand name company will be adequate. Learn how to sharpen them freehand and if you are working on a bus, buy a dozen of the common small sizes. My experience with hardware store bits is that they are low quality imports sold at high price, when stuck to a piece of cardboard and plastic wrapped.

For my shop, I buy all the fractional sizes up to 1/4" by the package (10 or 12) as well as the number and letter sizes that are tap drill, machine screw clearance, or rivet size. When drilling holes in MCI Z bar framing I broke more bits than any other time in my life. If you can't stop immediately when the bit breaks through, it hits the material behind at an angle and promptly breaks the end of the bit. (This is where I should have used those bits that will bend 90*!)
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NCbob
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« Reply #23 on: July 10, 2006, 06:17:01 PM »

Way back, in my younger years I was trained as a Tool & Die maker.  I didn't like working indoors let alone all the dust and mess...but I did enjoy the machine work.  I learned early on how to sharpen a drill bit...anything from 1/4" to 2 1/2 inch.  And spent some time helping the guy who sharpened the end mills (cutter grinder)...now there's a whole new world in cutting geometry.

Since my poor old tired eyes are not as good as they used to be....sharpening drill bits became a chore.  I bought a Drill Doctor and since then...it's a cinch.

But too, I bought some WestLube....talk about a whole new world of revelation!  That's the greatest thing since sliced bread!

You can drill and tap S/S (the toughest thing since my ex-wife) and if you drill slowly...like cutting through butter with a hot knife!

FWIW,

Bob
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jlaney
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« Reply #24 on: July 10, 2006, 09:16:19 PM »

tyler tx
i was using a cheap  1/8 in drill and it bent and broke , went right thru my thumb nail and finger.

jlaney
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j.t. laney  tyler texas 1980 prevost lemirage
kingfa39
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« Reply #25 on: July 12, 2006, 07:18:09 AM »

Stan, seems that we are clashing a lot, i was passing along what i observed at the show, as always just trying to help out , i dont have any of these bits but i did try to and could not break the little 1/8 bit, it also went through a head of a hammer with no lube in a heartbeat, this after drilling through a concrete block, Sorry ill try to stay silent in the future
Frank Allen
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Stan
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« Reply #26 on: July 12, 2006, 11:52:44 AM »

Frank: I certainly didn't mean any offence. I have just seen too many marvels of the age that never amount to anything being sold at shows. I was with a friend of mine who bought a set of bits that were demonstrated in a similar fashion. They were pretty good bits compared to the hardware store variety. They were a TIN coated split point and maybe even cobalt which are available for less than half of the show price at any machine tool dealer. Within a month, he had broken all of the smaller sizes and confirmed that they were not better than what he had previously. He was a diesel mechanic so he had quite a bit of experience with drill bits.

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