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Author Topic: Bus polishing mistakes?  (Read 3966 times)
plyonsMC9
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« on: June 01, 2009, 09:20:08 PM »

Hi All!

I've been doing some polishing of my MC9 / stainless sides.  I have not quite got the hang of the polishing process - been using supplies purchased from International Bus Parts (IBP) - and I've noticed wax "specks" on the stainless surface.  My buffer pads don't seem overly caked w/ buffing compound - actually seem pretty clean to me..  Also, I clean them on the rake & try not to overdo the compound.   Could I be spinning the buffer wheel too quickly?  Using a Mikita.  I think it was set to 4.5   It was the blue compound I noticed the most specks with.  

When I slowed the polisher down a bit, there seemed to be less specks.  Tho', now I'm wondering if it will ever finish at the slower RPM. 

As a side note - Is IBP still around?  I've not seen anything from them in a while. 

Thank you!

Phil Lyons
« Last Edit: June 01, 2009, 09:30:15 PM by plyonsMC9 » Logged

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Ray D
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« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2009, 09:51:16 PM »

Don't know what you mean about wax specks, but I will assume you mean the residue from polishing.  Very, very dirty job and you should be able to remove the residue with paint thinner.  If you're using the blue compound you must  be on the finish end of this and I stack 3  10" loose cotton wheels at the buffers top speed, the 10" wheels will give you even more speed.  You go in the direction the buffer is turning in a straight line, not sidewise.  It is not easy to get the hang of this either.  I have IBP directions for the use of their products if you want me to email this to you, or if you want to call me I would be happy to go over what I have learned about buffing.

Ray D
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plyonsMC9
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« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2009, 09:55:07 PM »

Hi Ray - I do appreciate your offer, and will get in touch as my polishing to date has been more buffoonery than buffing.   Grin

Yes, residue from the polishing is what I have.  In the interim, I'll give the paint thinner a try as you suggest.  I have the IBP directions, but would really appreciate your insights.

Kind Regards, Phil
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« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2009, 10:04:56 PM »

Sure there not mud specks from the wifes garden? No seriously I'd loose the Makita and buy a variable speed 90 degree grinder to use with the large pads. Snap On makes a really nice unit at least they used to.
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plyonsMC9
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« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2009, 05:29:26 AM »

Ha Ha - very nice Airbag - specks from wife's garden.   Cheesy 

What exactly are "large pads".  I know very little in this area - the Mikita is a 90degree, variable speed, but the pads don't look real big at 8 inches.  What should I be looking for?

Thank you!!

Best Regards,

Phil "The Gardener" Lyons   Cheesy
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Van
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« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2009, 06:43:08 AM »

Phil,try this site out.I use the same deWalt machine DW849 7"/9" machine,run mine @1800 rpm(YMMV) .Takes practice,be patient ,the results can be satisfying .
Hope this helps/works Smiley
http://www.autogeek.net/metal-polishing-how-to.html

It pretty much covers aluminum but is the same practice.
I chose this machine because it is pretty much in wide spread use by most proffessional body/paint men,funny 2 close friends of mine ,couldn't agree on the time of day,let alone the paints and materials to use on a plane being restored at the time ,
yet they do agree on the equipment they use that was good enogh for me. Grin
« Last Edit: June 02, 2009, 06:53:42 AM by van » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2009, 07:40:57 AM »

Good morning Phil,

IBP is still around for sure!  I've been here for almost 15 years now (June 6th anniversary date).  Business is in a slow down just like the rest of the country but we are doing whatever it takes to keep the doors open.  Give me a call if we can help out

One thing I've recently found out is the white or the blue compund can be used as the final stage of polishing.  Some of the polishers use the white last because it isn't as "greasy".  You may try this and see if that will help.

Steve Kolb
IBP Industries Inc (International Bus & Parts)
www.ibpindustries.com
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plyonsMC9
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« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2009, 07:47:54 AM »

Steve, great to hear IBP is still alive & kicking!   You guys had really helped me out in the past - when all my URL links stopped working (old web site I guess? ) I got concerned. 

I'll be in touch.  Grin

Thanks for the ideas on white vs. blue - I'll give 'er a go.

Kind Regards, Phil
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« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2009, 08:18:26 AM »

We did change the website a while back and unfortunately didn't keep the link from the old one.  I don't get on the bulletin board very often but figured I better today since I heard these rumors were floating around.  Give me a call when you get the chance, We may have some of the loose buff wheels mentioned above.
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Hobie
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« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2009, 08:49:06 AM »

Couple of thoughts:
1.  I prefer a fast wheel and a light touch.  Speed not torque is what doing the work.  
2.  Is your work area clean and free from road grime?  Since it is stainless, use lacquer thinner to clean before buffing.  ( If painted, use surface prep from a body shop supplier)
3.  Is your wheel moist or wet to touch?  If so, you are using too much compound.
4.  Apply compound to the metal using a 2" paint brush.  ...not too much.
5.  Is your wheel clean and fluffy?  No clumps on the wheel.  Try this:  Use a can opener to clean the wheel.  Get the old style " church key".  The kind to pierce a hole in the can.  Place the buffer on the ground and use the pointed end to clean the wheel.   ( watch for loose clothing!)  
6.  Are the specks dried compound?  If so, the wheel was too dry or ran out of compound during buffing.  Simply brush some new compound and rebuff to remove them.
7.  Since the wheel turns clockwise, work top to bottom and left to right in about 2' swaths down the bus.  This method will sling compound away and leave the buffed area clean.  
8.  Be extra careful when buffing near a painted area.  It is very easy to 'burn' an edge, thus removing the paint.  Those areas are best done by hand.  
9.  What kind of pad are you using.  Like sandpaper there are coarser and finer pads.  Try a #5. also called a "cutting pad".  They are not very fluffy and almost look like worn our shag carpet.  Once you achieve the shine and if you have swirl marks, then you can switch to a fluffy pad and rebuff using a polishing compound.   That's what we call an, "$## busting" shine!!!
« Last Edit: June 02, 2009, 08:53:10 AM by Hobie » Logged
plyonsMC9
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« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2009, 10:32:45 AM »

Excellent post Hobie- I'll keep this around for reference.  Thank you.

Have not ever tried the lacquer thinner.  Will do so.

Sounds like I'm using a different compound, in white, blue & brown bricks.  Wheel is never moist.  No clumps - I use a large fork on a stick kind of aparatus to clean the buffing wheels.

Wheel is fluffy.  Specs are actually dried compound, not from wife's flower bed.   Cheesy

Will look for the #5.  I think that is what I'm missing, takes a Loooooong time, to make any kind of impact on one small area.  and I know it is supposed to be time consuming - but I can spend hours on a panel and show very little progress.

Pad I'm using is attached in the photo - using two of those fluffy ones bolted bolted together on the polisher.

How does one do this kind of polishing by hand?  I definetly have some areas where I think that would be very useful.

Thanks again!

Best Regards, Phil
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« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2009, 11:04:13 AM »

Steve,

I see your still on and I have a question. Some years ago some one told me that you folks purchased alot of the spare parts inventory for the Model 20 Eagles from NJT. Any truth to that?
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« Reply #12 on: June 02, 2009, 11:33:07 AM »

You are using a wheel designed for a bench or floor polisher.  Also the bristles are too long and soft for this job.   Here is my setup.

Try using a paste hand rubbing compound used for auto paint. Yes, you can use it with a power buffer.  Stop by a auto body supplier to find these items.  Some Napa's also carry refinishing supplies.   Good luck.
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Hobie
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« Reply #13 on: June 02, 2009, 11:34:49 AM »

This is an 8" wheel to fit on a 3/4" spindle.
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plyonsMC9
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« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2009, 01:51:11 PM »

Thanks again Hobie!!!

I am really getting pretty pumped about trying again.  I'm going to track down those wheels & paste.

You mentioned doing the smaller parts by hand - do I just use the same compound, or is there a special technique to that?  I do have some very small areas which I'd like to tackle as well.

Thank you! 

Phil Lyons
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