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Author Topic: Bus polishing mistakes?  (Read 4261 times)
JackConrad
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« Reply #15 on: June 02, 2009, 02:36:35 PM »

Phil,
   I use 2 of the pads like the one you show in your post. I start with a brick of Black (emory) compound, then go to red (tripoli). Then depending on what the surface looks like after the first 2, I use green, white, blue.  I use differnet wheels for each differnent compound.  I hit the center of the pads with a little spray paint to match the compound color so I can keep track of which pad goes with which compound. I mount the pads on a 9" Makita angle grinder.  I also use a "pad rake" to clean the pads (I got the rake from IBP)  Jack
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« Reply #16 on: June 02, 2009, 02:38:07 PM »

Glad to help Phil.   For hand work use a soft damp cloth and dab a little compound on it and start rubbing.   Use you finger wrapped with the rag, ... a small wad,  you will discover what works best for the particular area.  

When using the wheel the compound will sling everywhere.  Depending on where you are working you may consider draping a plastic drop cloth over things to keep the dust off.  

After you are finished for the day, I like to wash or at least use a damp soft rag to wipe off any compound that drips into cracks, onto mirrors, mouldings, etc.  Dawn dish soap solution works well.  

By the way, when using this type of wheel keep it tipped slightly just enough so it is not flat against the surface.  This will quickly become apparent as it is easier to control.  Just don't want you to scratch the surface with the center nut!    

You will see electric polishers for sale that use a pad that looks similar to what I showed you.  Don't use them.  They don't rotate will enough speed and are not designed for serious buffing.  I think they are used to apply liquid wax.  
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JackConrad
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« Reply #17 on: June 02, 2009, 02:51:07 PM »

Hobie,
   I think we are using different compounds.  I think what you are using is a cream.  What I am using (and I think what Phil is using) comes in a "brick" and is applied by holding the brick against the edge of the wheel while the grinder is running to transfer compound to the wheel. Jack
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« Reply #18 on: June 02, 2009, 02:58:27 PM »

Jack,
Are use using the same long soft 'bristle' wheel like is Phil's photo or are you using the stitched cloth one?  How bad was the original surface?  My methods are more suited to a previously buffed surface.   But I am always open to learning !   Take care.  
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JackConrad
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« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2009, 03:06:40 PM »

    So far, I have able to get by with the loose cotton wheels like the one Phil posted the photo of.  Our coach was the OEM satin finish SS when I started.
    When using the black, boy am I black by the end of the day LOL.  I purchased some of those disposable paper coveralls that painters use. A pair of those, a bandana across my face (like a old west robber), a pair of goggles and another bandana tied on my head. At the end of the day, the bandanas go in the laundry and the coveralls go in the trash.  Jack
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« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2009, 03:38:11 PM »

You are right, I suggesting the cream type.  Feels like gritty toothpaste between your fingers.   

Now I'm curious if using the stitched type rouge wheel would be better for a first time buff of satin to smooth.  You could really lean on those pads!
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Ray D
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« Reply #21 on: June 02, 2009, 04:25:43 PM »

Here is a sight that will explain the different type of polishing wheels and has a lot of other good info.  They also have a forum on polishing.

http://www.caswellplating.com/buffs/buffman.htm

Ray D
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plyonsMC9
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« Reply #22 on: June 02, 2009, 07:04:57 PM »

I would just like to thank all you good folk who have been sharing your knowledge.  The expertise is just amazing and APPRECIATED!!!

Thank you!!!

I'm going to get started as soon as the bus gets back from her annual maintenance check up.

Kind Regards,
Phil
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Northern Arizona / 1983 - MC9
mikelutestanski
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« Reply #23 on: June 03, 2009, 07:35:58 AM »

Hello:    Caswell plating prices are cheaper than any around. THey have good technical info also. The spiral wheels work well. THey have a new denim wheel that may last longer but have not tried that yet. We are in the process of starting that job.
   We are completing the painting project and just now getting the lights and mirrors remounted along with the fenders.
     just made an order with Caswell today for more buffing wheels of smaller sizes to get into places by the marker lights .
     Regards and happy bussin
    mike
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Mike Lutestanski   Dunnellon Florida
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PP
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« Reply #24 on: June 03, 2009, 08:08:56 AM »

Hi Phil,
Let's back up a moment. Are you trying to buff and Polish the SS so it's shiny, or are you trying to make it look like chrome? My bus was OEM flat SS from the paint down and I have been working on it for the last year and a half trying to achieve a chrome-like finish. I started by wet-sanding it with 400 grit and moved up to 600 and then 1200. I am currently working on the 1200, but every now and then I finish out a section just to keep my interest. I use Dico products available in some hardware stores and most tool shops. Here's a link http://www.dicoproducts.com/
It sounds very similar to what Jack is using. I purchase the round sticks. When I've sanded an area well enough, I use the Black or E-5 with emory in it. Then I progress to the SC for stainless buffing, and then finally the white rouge for a mirror finish. Always use a dedicated pad for each stick. I can't stress enough about cross contamination.
Also, I have found that using a 1425RPM drill with wool carpeting is great for the E-5. You can buy cheap little sanding disks for drills from Walmart for $5 each and cut your own pads out of wool carpet rems. I had some carpeting from remodeling the bedroom and made me about a dozen pads. I chuck them rather than fork them.
When I advance to the SC stick, I swith up to a 10" buffer that I got from Harbor Ft for $35 with a wool pad also purchased from them. When I do the final White rouge, I use a soft cotton pad on the 10" at high speed. To avoid burning the paint, i left the last ridge unpolished at this time.
Let me know if you need pictures, someting is screwing up eitehr with the site or my computor, good luck, Will










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PP
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« Reply #25 on: June 03, 2009, 08:17:02 AM »

One more thing about cleaning it once you've polished it. Someone suggested using Brake Fluid--DON'T!!
I tried it just out of curiosity and it took the mirror-like finish right off. Before I used it I could shave in it, after using brake fluid, i could barely see my face in it (Not that that is all bad). The little beads of polish that you will leave behind are better rubbed off with a terry cloth towel or some such. I know, it's a lot of work, but then anything worthwhile doesn't come easy Grin Grin
In the end,it all boils down to what you're after.
PS-I studied the Caswell site before I started and talked to a lot of body professionals. I was amazed at how many people tried to sell me products and information on painted surfaces which is a whole nother ball game.
Good luck, Will
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PP
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« Reply #26 on: June 03, 2009, 09:30:30 AM »

Here's a Picture if I can get them to load-seem to be having problems with my cordless keyboard
The first is a latch on a bay after polishing.
The second is a before started polishing bus.
The third is my progress so far.
Sorry about the size, I had to shrink thm and I got carried away, Will
« Last Edit: June 03, 2009, 09:33:57 AM by PP » Logged

skolbibp
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« Reply #27 on: June 03, 2009, 12:47:59 PM »

We didn't acquire any parts from NJT but we have made some of the replacement stainless panels for the NJT Eagles.  You can email me direct or give me a call.  My email is skolb@ibpindustries.com or call 1-800-468-5287 x232.
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PP
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« Reply #28 on: June 03, 2009, 03:49:16 PM »

I'm goofing off today so I decided to take a few pictures of the tools I'm using and the pads I cut from carpeting (wool) plus the finish pad I use on the variable speed buffer.
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PP
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« Reply #29 on: June 03, 2009, 03:53:30 PM »

The little arbor and disks come from Wally World for five bucks and you can put any kind of homemade pads on them. I experimented with terry cloth among other things. The short nap wool carpet really impresses me the most.
Hope this helps, Will
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