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Author Topic: towing a 1/2 ton van  (Read 1066 times)
ttomas
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« on: June 06, 2009, 08:35:21 AM »

Is towing a Ford e150 an option with an mc9, 6v92 automatic? Thanks for your response. Tomas
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Tenor
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« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2009, 11:00:20 AM »

Tomas,
Could you give some more info, such as do you intend to use a tow dolly, a tow bar, or a trailer?  Is your van an automatic or a stick?  We can help a lot more with these answers.  There will be a way to do it, how just depends on some more info.  Thanks!

Glenn
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Glenn Williams
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1968 MCI 7 Ser. No. 7476 Unit No. 10056
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4 speed Spicer
ttomas
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« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2009, 03:51:14 PM »

THANKS Glen,   my question is "can the bus handle it?" I will tow it with a tow bar, and a drive shaft disconnect. I also have a brake buddy.
I believe I've read where it was not advisable to tow a full size van with an MCI, and would like to hear some other opinions. I appreciate this site and the valuable info that comes through it.
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JackConrad
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« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2009, 04:17:30 PM »

Where are you planning to tow (flat roads of Florida or I-70 through Denver)?  We towed a 3/4 ton Ford 4X4 pick-up in florida with our MC-8 (8V71 & 740 Automatic) with no problem. we never tried towing it in the Eastern mountains, so I don't know how that would have worked out.  Jack
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Growing Older Is Mandatory, Growing Up Is Optional
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ttomas
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« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2009, 04:26:17 PM »

Thanks Jack, I want to tow it from Virginia to California on a northern route so there will be some mountains involved. I would probably unhitch and have someone with me drive it through the extreme ereas.
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Hartley
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« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2009, 07:03:33 PM »

Keep in mind that the van could provide extra push in an emergency...No Seriously


A little while back a person who shall remain nameless had a engine problem with his
4104 and his wife jumped in the Toyota Tundra (toad) and pushed the bus the rest of the way home. ( 2-way radios required ) But although not recommended or getting caught It does show some possibilities. The onboard generator and air compressor sure came in handy that day.

OK, I will shut up... It is a TRUE story and several people know about it.

Dave..
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« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2009, 07:58:33 PM »

I'm towing a 1/2 ton Silverado extended cab p.u. with my MC9.  I'm running an 8v71 with a 754 Allison, and the truck weighs in at a little over #5,000.  Haven't been anywhere out west, but it does ok in the mountains of VA.  I do make it a practice to watch my rpm's and shift manually so I don't lug the engine.  The engine driven fan needs the rpm in order to cool adequately, but I'll bet you knew that.  It's no show-off on the hills, but it gets the job done.  Temps usually stay around 185. Just my experience thus far.
Dennis   
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Blue Ridge Mountains of VA   Hi Yo Silver! MC9
edroelle
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« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2009, 07:33:13 AM »

You will go slow in the western mountains.  But if you watch your engine temperatures, you should be capable.   Dependent on your engine condition, you could be down to 19 MPH on some steep grades. 

We have run the western mountains with a somewhat tired 8V71, pulling a dolly and a Buick LeSabre.  Engine temperature was the only problem, even with new radiators, good sealing, etc.  Ambients though were 105 degrees.

I have always wondered about running the toad on steep grades.  My concern is how would you know if you working your toad's torque converter so much that you are burning the trans. fluid and thus the transmission?


Ed Roelle
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bobofthenorth
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« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2009, 11:05:56 AM »

Many years ago we met up with a couple on the California coast - I can't remember where but it was somewhere south of S.F.  They had come through San Franscisco with a plugged fuel filter on their motorhome with a 454.  He was worried about climbing over the Golden Gate so he put his wife in the Aerostar that they towed.  He told her to push hard enough that she saw the temp gauge start to climb and then back out a bit.  That got them to a GM dealership somewhere on the south side of the bridge.  In a pinch I wouldn't be afraid to do the same for a short distance.
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R.J.(Bob) Evans
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