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Author Topic: When mirrored walls are installed on a bus, what kind of mirror is used?  (Read 2807 times)
Kevin Warnock
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« on: June 17, 2009, 12:27:31 PM »

When looking at some commercial conversions, I see they use mirrors on some walls to make the rooms seem larger. Are they using normal household mirrors, which I presume are untempered? Or are they tempered? Or is there a source for tempered mirrors and mirror tiles?

Thanks
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Tenor
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« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2009, 12:32:06 PM »

I think you want tempered in case of an accident.  No expert here, just taking a guess.

Glenn
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Jeremy
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« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2009, 12:51:58 PM »

Some time ago I asked a question on here about the mirrors used in one member's conversion, and it transpired that they were plastic. It took me some time to find suppliers of a similar product here in the UK, but I'm very glad I did as I think it is by far the best solution in our application, not least because they can be cut and shaped as required without special tools and skills.

I'm afraid I've forgotton who it was that originally put me on to them, but I was very grateful for the advice & information

Jeremy
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« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2009, 01:09:45 PM »

Mirrored Stainless may also be an option.

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niles500
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« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2009, 02:14:40 PM »

As Jeremy said - Plastic - I certainly wouldn't put anything made of glass in any type of RV or Motor Vehicle - Even the Plastic ones can crack - just ask me - HTH
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Sean
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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2009, 02:20:42 PM »

We used plastic mirrors for safety.

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
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« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2009, 02:25:50 PM »

I USED A PLASTIC MATERIAL 1/8 INCH thick and came in 4x8 sheets cost about 80 dollars. Purchased from piedmont plastics
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loosenut
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« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2009, 02:32:33 PM »

I have basic cheapo mirrors the same as the ones from Walmart and installed with liquid nails or similar.  They are in the bathroom. 

Mike
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« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2009, 02:42:14 PM »

I have a Mirrored ceiling in front area of my RTS (wife wouldn't let me put a mirrored ceiling in the bedroom ;-(

I used Acrylic Plastic from Piedmont Plastic about $100 - custon cut

see picture
« Last Edit: June 17, 2009, 02:45:42 PM by RTS/Daytona » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2009, 02:52:58 PM »

We have a lot of mirrored walls (tempered) in our conversion not mirrored tiles but solid and it has never been a problem but overhead I would use platsic.I use the plexaglass mirror for the inserts in the fridge door only because glass is to thick    good luck
« Last Edit: June 17, 2009, 02:56:42 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2009, 03:18:25 PM »

Your only issue with plastic is cleaning it without scratching it. Use Acrylic not Lexan it will be more resistant to scratches. It is harder to cut and cracks easier and more expensive but worth it. Special techniques for drilling and cutting.
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BUR
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« Reply #11 on: June 17, 2009, 05:07:58 PM »

I tried using acrylic, 1/8" with 1/8" backer board with adhesive holding them together in my closet doors. I called them my "circus mirrors". The women loved them, it made them look a little slimmer, I hated them, you looked down the hallway and saw this distorted image. Replaced them with tempered glass with a rubber backing and it cost less than I payed for the acrylic. Lesson learned!    BUR
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« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2009, 05:12:06 PM »

in my one 48 foot hospitality trailer the front wall was a one piece standard mirror that was 5 feet tall and 8 feet wide. it was there for tens of thousands of miles and never an issue. I would tend to think that if the bus is moving enough to damage the mirror then something is probably moving too much. I would use the mastic for mirrors to install it as it does not harden and will let the mirror move a little as you drive.
just my 2 cents.
steve
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belfert
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« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2009, 05:21:58 PM »

For my bathroom I just used an ordinary glass mirror and even hung it with the provided clips instead of mastic.  No issues in 10,000 miles.

Well, I did break the first mirror after removing it for renovations, but that doesn't count.
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Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
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« Reply #14 on: June 17, 2009, 06:46:19 PM »

Hi Guy's,

I used glass mirrors in my bedroom and bathroom. It's very thick with 1 1/8" bevel and siliconed to the wall. No problems at all..

In the kitchen, I used acrylic block panels that look like glass block attached to an original bus window and are 1/4" thick.

Nick-
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« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2009, 08:32:07 PM »

Nick,

Those blocks look great. What brand are they?



Kevin
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Kevin Warnock
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« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2009, 10:54:07 PM »

I love those glass blocks. Where did you get them?

Here's the url that prompted my original question:

http://www.philcooper.com/gallery/loh-00/second_view_of_private_bath_lots_of_mirrors

The 12"x12" mirrors in this bathroom appear to be real glass, since the edges are beveled, and I've never seen beveled plastic mirrors.

What is the mastic people are talking about in this thread? If it never hardens, that would suggest even if the mirror cracks that no big chunks are going to fall off the wall and slice you open.

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Nick Badame Refrig/ACC
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« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2009, 03:42:00 AM »

Hi Guy's,

Windecor
http://www.windecor.com/products.cfm

Nick-
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« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2009, 06:40:13 AM »

We used beveled glass mirrors in our conversion. The glass company I bougth them from coated the back with some sort of tape. I have close to 60000 miles on the conversion a no problems. ( knock on wood)  I do not know what the tape was but if you are intrested I will ask.

Good Luck Wayne
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luvrbus
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« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2009, 07:22:51 AM »

The mastic is called Gunther ultra/bond for mirrors stay soft and will not cause a good mirror to desilver  comes in a tube or tape form 18 bucks a tube and probably more for tape.If you notice a mirror with streaks in the background that is because the wrong mastic was used silicone and liquid nail are the worst   good luck
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« Reply #20 on: June 18, 2009, 10:46:30 AM »

Nick,
I went to the site you posted and they have a section of photos of actual use.  I think you should send them a picture.  A window in a bus conversion using their product is certainly unique!
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