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Author Topic: Any way to make carriage bolt holes without machine shop?  (Read 4391 times)
gumpy
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« Reply #15 on: July 24, 2009, 10:04:03 PM »

The problem with using plastic rather than wood is that the acid that leaks out of the batteries will run off the plastic and onto the aluminum bus bay. Plywood will absorb the acid, and keep it in place. Yes, over time, it will deteriorate, but when it does in 5-10 years, you can just cut a new piece and replace it. It works very well and keeps the acid from eating your bays.

Definetely plywood over plastic for batteries unless the plastic is in the form of a fully contained box.

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Craig Shepard
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Len Silva
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« Reply #16 on: July 25, 2009, 07:26:48 AM »

There is no mechanical problem that cannot be solved with brute force and ignorance.
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kyle4501
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« Reply #17 on: July 25, 2009, 01:22:22 PM »

If it jams, force it. That is why they make bigger hammers.
If it breaks, it probably needed replacing anyways. . . .


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I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. (R.M. Nixon)
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« Reply #18 on: July 25, 2009, 02:32:26 PM »

The problem with using plastic rather than wood is that the acid that leaks out of the batteries will run off the plastic and onto the aluminum bus bay. Plywood will absorb the acid, and keep it in place. Yes, over time, it will deteriorate, but when it does in 5-10 years, you can just cut a new piece and replace it. It works very well and keeps the acid from eating your bays.

Definetely plywood over plastic for batteries unless the plastic is in the form of a fully contained box.

I am using AGM batteries so I have bigger problems if they ever discharge any acid.  My golf cart batteries seemed to always be coated in a layer of crap even though they never seemed to need any water when I checked them.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
gus
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« Reply #19 on: July 26, 2009, 06:24:28 PM »

Whatever you put underneath batteries should not be solid unless it can hold moisture away from the metal. Anything else will allow moisture and acid between it and the metal and provide perfect corrosion conditions.

If you have nothing that will hold water then trips of rubber or solid wood are best because they allow air circulation under the battery.

Plywood will, indeed, absorb the wet overflow and provide perfect corrosion conditions. Plywood is a perfect sponge. The whole idea is to keep the metal compartment floor dry. If it is dry it won't corrode.

My only complaint about plastic is it will let the battery slide around because it is very slick.
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PD4107-152
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Dallas
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« Reply #20 on: July 26, 2009, 07:02:52 PM »

Actually,
I didn't mention using plastic for the whole floor.
what I mentioned was cutting strips from a plastic cutting board to use instead of the angle iron that he was talking about.
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gus
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« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2009, 09:23:46 PM »

Dallas,

I knew that but didn't make myself clear. All the plastic I have found is pretty slick stuff.

I would never make a solid battery bottom cover unless it would positively hold liquids away from the metal. I've never tried to do this because the rubber strips work so well.
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PD4107-152
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belfert
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« Reply #22 on: July 28, 2009, 04:20:35 AM »

My plan is still to use the aluminum angle as I already have it.  I just need a little strip of something along the edges to go over the bolt heads to keep the bolt heads from wearing through the battery case over time.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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