Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
November 24, 2014, 01:22:30 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: It will not be stolen by your mailman or your neighbor who also may be into buses.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: What wire are folks using in their conversions  (Read 1012 times)
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5451




Ignore
« on: September 16, 2009, 01:44:34 PM »

What type of wire are folks using for the AC and DC wiring in their buses?

I used marine wire for both the DC and AC sides of my bus and I'm told that is not allowed.  I still think a tinned stranded wire is superior to plain stranded copper.  It looks I going to be completely rewiring my bus in less than 12 days which is going to suck.  I also have at least 300 feet of brand new marine wire I'll have to scrap.  Hopefully I can send back the wire I just bought.

I did buy a copy of NFPA 1192 from nfpa.org and I will be reading that later this evening. 
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Len Silva
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4086


Angle Parked in a Parallel Universe


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2009, 01:50:10 PM »

Brian,

This subject has been beat to death a hundred times.  Boat wire is fine, it just does not technically meet the NEC requirements.  It is probably superior, just has not been tested or approved. I certainly would not replace it if properly installed.

The NFPA 1192 will be disappointing as it does not address electrical issues. Great information on plumbing, ventilation, and gas.
Logged


Hand Made Gifts

Ignorance is only bliss to the ignorant.
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12912




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2009, 02:18:54 PM »

Brian, I used marine grade wiring in my conversion 15 years ago and it has never been a problem.
I also used marine grade connectors with some type adhesive and heat shrink made on the connectors and a good crimper but like Len I have seen 30 year old S&S with romex never have problems.



good luck
Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
Jerry Liebler
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1320




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2009, 02:34:22 PM »

While there is no doubt that 'boat wire' works well in a bus conversion, it does NOT comply with the National Electric Code!  What does noncompliance mean?  Usually not much BUT it is a reason that an insurance company can deny a claim, should you ever have one.  Is it worth the risk?  That's up to you!  With the 'boat wire' paying for insurance is likely wasting your money.  Were it me I'd not use ANY 'boat wire'.
Regards
Jerry 4107 1120
Logged
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12912




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2009, 03:22:09 PM »

I don't buy that Jerry, Richard Bowyers Eagle was all marine wiring the insurance co didn't have a problem paying him and is the same Co I  use.
If that were the case they could make the same argument about the house type fridges, ac,heat,and other household type items we use in conversions not approved for RV use. FWIW Richards fire was started from a house type space heater not from wiring  


good luck
« Last Edit: September 16, 2009, 04:54:17 PM by luvrbus » Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
Jerry Liebler
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1320




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2009, 04:10:29 PM »

Like I said, it's up to the owner.  Do it your way once again.  The other items are not the clear subject of the NEC but wire type is.  Trusting insurance companies is not my favorite pastime.  One example isn't a very satisfying proof.
Regards
Jerry 4107 1120
Logged
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5451




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2009, 04:24:48 PM »

Nobody would ever get a dime from insurance companies if every rule had to be followed to the letter.  How may auto crashes are caused by violating some traffic law?  Do they tell folks sorry your brakes were only 95% and if 100% you may have stopped another foot shorter and avoided the accident?

Please, don't argue if marine wire is okay or not.  I'm quite likely to rip it all out in the next month (or maybe this week even) and redo the whole thing.

I just want to know what of wire (besides marine wire) folks are using in bus conversions for both AC and DC.

I did waste my $36 to find out that NFPA 1129 doesn't cover RV electrical.  I'm not going to pay $110 for a copy of the NEC, but I think I can borrow a copy.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5451




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2009, 04:43:57 PM »

For some reason I thought Sean referenced NFPA 1192 when he was talking about code, but he was referring to the NFPA codes in the general.  $36 down the drain for basically nothing.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Len Silva
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4086


Angle Parked in a Parallel Universe


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: September 16, 2009, 05:21:34 PM »

There is a lot of good information in 1192 as regards pipe sizes, ventilation, labels etc.  Not a waste of money at all in my book.

If your bus is done properly in marine wire, I would not replace it.  I am something of a code wonk and would not have used it in the first place.  Ripping it out and starting over is an over reaction in my book (but maybe not in yours Smiley)

As to using 10 gauge, your 30 amp circuits at home are all dedicated, water heater, dryer, etc. and they pull something less than 30 amps.  Chances are that the feed to your inverter/charger will be right at 30 amps a lot of the time.  Thus the advice to upsize, though not strictly a requirement.

You may be able to check out a copy of the NEC from a library and copy the sections you need (probably less than 10% of the book).

Very simplified, except for isolating the neutral, RV wiring is very similar to regular house wiring as far as the code goes.  It is more similar to wiring a mobile home which has the same neutral requirements.

If you feel strongly about not using solid wire, you might as well keep the boat wire.  Doing it over in stranded will require using conduit for stranded wire. (There is no stranded Romex in the smaller sizes).

Len
Logged


Hand Made Gifts

Ignorance is only bliss to the ignorant.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!