Bus Conversions dot Com Bulletin Board
October 31, 2014, 10:50:57 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: If you had an Online Subscription: You can zoom in to make the text larger and easier to read.
   Home   Help Forum Rules Search Calendar Login Register BCM Home Page Contact BCM  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Slow and steady  (Read 5588 times)
frontman
Frontman
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 59



WWW

Ignore
« on: October 08, 2009, 07:49:23 PM »

Well, things are not moving fast, but they are moving forward.  We finished all the welding on the tubing and then got it all primed and painted.  the front cap is on and we hope to get the side skins on next week if the weather holds. 
I am a little scared to put the skins on in 50 degree weather.  I'm worried that it will expand in the heat and start to show waves. 
I probably over killed the welding on the tubing, but I thought I may as well replace every bad piece since I had it all apart.  We welded a piece 8 inches up from the bottom of the windows so the bottom window channel had something to fasten to.  Then I added a vertical in every window opening I wasn't using. 
I am still a little worried about getting it moving again.  I had some guys get a little crazy pulling out old wires and they pretty much took everything out.  I wanted to move all the electrical inside anyway, but I wanted to do it in my shop.  I'm hoping to wire it enough to move to it's winter home and then spend the cold WI months wiring and building walls and cabinets.   
Logged

Chad
Ob1quixote
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 35




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2009, 08:06:24 PM »

Maybe use a torpedo heater to heat the panels as you weld them?
Logged
Dreamscape
Dreamscape
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3305


1968 Silver Eagle Model 01 8V71 Allison 740 #7443


WWW
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2009, 08:25:28 PM »

I love looking at naked Eagles!

Good job!

Paul
Logged

Becky and Paul Lawry, On The Road
Travel Blog - http://dreamscapetravels.wordpress.com/
Bus Blog - http://dreamscapesilvereagle.wordpress.com/
______________________________________________________

Our coach was originally owned by the Dixie Echoes.
frontman
Frontman
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 59



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2009, 09:13:48 PM »

Thanks, I will try heating them up.  I was going to rivet the skins on, but is welding an option?
Logged

Chad
Don4107
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 407





Ignore
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2009, 09:31:29 PM »

Some of the local walk up fast food places have electric heaters that hang on chains kinda like those cheap shop florescent lights.  Look like this-

http://www.zearth.com/Infratech-21-1045-Patio-Heater-Hanging-Infratech-W1524-Stainless-Steel-Electric-Hanging-Heater-P1840.aspx?utm_source=ZFF&utm_medium=ZBuy&utm_campaign=ZE1

I would think that you could control the heat pretty well by adjusting the distance from the panel.  Use your infrared thermometer to check.  Put it on rollers and move it along as you rivet.  Heat the section between where you last riveted and where you are going to rivet next.

Good luck
Don 4107
Logged

Don 4107 Eastern Washington
1975 MCI 5B
1966 GM PD 4107 for sale
1968 GMC Carpenter
frontman
Frontman
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 59



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2009, 05:24:22 AM »

Thanks Don, I will look into those heaters.  Should be an interesting day!
Logged

Chad
Len Silva
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4086


Angle Parked in a Parallel Universe


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2009, 06:07:17 AM »

I have only assisted in skinning a few Eagles, but here is what we did.

A single sheet of aluminum (.080 I think), cut to the proper width, and about five feet longer than needed from front to back. It will take four or five helpers. Since the roof skin is still on, you will have to remove all the rivets and open the gap enough for the new skin to slip under the roof and the front skin/front cap.

Prepare a clamp for the rear of the skin with a couple of pieces of angle iron and a short length of chain, so you can keep steady tension on it all the time.

With lots of helpers holding it in up, rivet the front of the new skin in place and put tension on the back of it.

Using a propane weed burner, start at the front, heating and riveting toward the rear.  The hard part is using the proper amount of heat so that you don't over heat the aluminum.

You have to keep the flame moving, you have to keep the metal hot enough and you don't want to burn the guys doing the drilling and riveting, that might piss them off.

You cannot pre-drill more than a couple of feet at a time as the holes will not line up.

My experience was as one of the grunts, these are only observations.
Logged


Hand Made Gifts

Ignorance is only bliss to the ignorant.
luvrbus
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Posts: 12802




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2009, 07:10:12 AM »

Frontman, are you using aluminium or steel you get the best results from steel. 
Aluminium will always wave in the heat no matter what you do aluminum expands more than steel but is easier to use.
 But with the steel you can stretch and tack weld in place then go back and install the rivets

good luck
Logged

Life is short drink the good wine first
David Anderson
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 844


South Texas in the Eagle Ford Shale area




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2009, 09:13:32 AM »

It may not be in your plans, but I used fiberglass from R&M.  One long sheet each side, riveted under the roof skin and and the belt line below the windows.  Glued the rest in place with urethane.

The 2x4's in the picture is my glue press jig.

David

Addendum:
Oops, I just read down below that you are using steel.  My method won't help then.  Good luck in your installation.

« Last Edit: October 09, 2009, 11:33:14 AM by David Anderson » Logged
rusty
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 356





Ignore
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2009, 09:54:35 AM »

Frontman, I to used a one piece fiberglass from R&M. It makes for a nice install as you can go completly seamless, but be prepared to get rinkles in the hot sun. I did try to bond mine to plywood placed inside of the frame rails. It is now coming lose and I am not at all happy with it. I am building a 15 and it will have metal sides.

Good Luck Wayne
Logged
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5448




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2009, 10:21:20 AM »

You might consider a product called Alucobond for siding a bus.  Gumpy used it on his bus and I used it on mine.  Perfectly flat at any temperature and easy to install.

Downsides are the thickness, cost (potentially), and size limitations.  You will probably need multiple sheets per side.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2009, 12:25:43 PM by belfert » Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
frontman
Frontman
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 59



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #11 on: October 09, 2009, 11:30:11 AM »

I am using steel for the skins.  I just painted the inside of the steel skins today.  Should be ready to put it on Monday morning!
Logged

Chad
Fred Mc
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 368




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: October 09, 2009, 05:05:32 PM »

Belfert, how did you attach the Alucobond to your bus? I see it comes in different thicknesses.
Which did you use?

Fred.
Logged
belfert
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5448




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: October 09, 2009, 05:18:48 PM »

Belfert, how did you attach the Alucobond to your bus? I see it comes in different thicknesses.
Which did you use?

I think I used the medium thickness, but not really sure.  The local place I got the stuff from didn't mention multiple thicknesses.

I used poly caulk to seal the edges and shavehead rivets to secure the sheets.  I used seconds and the seconds are usually pretty small so I used a seperate sheet to cover each window opening.
Logged

Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!