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Author Topic: "It has a rebuilt engine"  (Read 3054 times)
thejumpsuitman
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« Reply #15 on: November 03, 2009, 11:00:41 AM »

Perhaps I'm starting to understand...  It's not so much that an engine rebuild is so unbelievable, but that it's relative importance is so overshadowed by many other factors...  Ahhh...

I am but a humble learner... LOL.
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Lin
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« Reply #16 on: November 03, 2009, 11:27:58 AM »

If they say the engine was rebuilt and is still under warranty, that would be a big deal.  I was considering a bus with a Series 60 in it.  They said they had replaced the turbo and rebuilt the head.  Don told me that something else was wrong to have caused the failures, and that the original problem had not been dealt with.  Some months later I came across the same bus for sale with a rebuilt Series 60.  I spoke to the guy that had bought it.  He said the engine failed on the way home.

Further, I think some of us old folk have a fuzzy perception of time.  I sometimes reach for a flannel shirt that looks pretty worn even though I have been thinking of it as new for 20 years now.  For our use, time may be a better standard then mileage.  Boasting about a 15 year old rebuild is sort of absurd.  It's like my saying that my Toyota had a brand new engine just 50,000 miles ago.  It's true, but that's when it was first purchased in 2000.
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kyle4501
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« Reply #17 on: November 03, 2009, 11:38:54 AM »

Yes, many variables involved - including operator actions.

One should also be aware that if you drive a 2 stroke like a car, you could kill it on the first hard pull up a long grade.

The engine will be ruined if you run it hot enough, it won't care who rebuilt it, what parts were used, or how many miles are on it.
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busshawg
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« Reply #18 on: November 03, 2009, 12:17:43 PM »

Now for my 2 cents worth, As mentioned almost every bus has a rebulit engine in it. In my eyes none of them are rebuilt until I see the documentation , and then at that point I can determine if it is actually rebuilt or patched. I believe there are a lot , if not most only patched. I also believe that most church buses or "non profit" organizations have had sub standard work preformed along the way. I doubt ALL are like this but most. When I bought my bus BW told me if it starts in cool weather (around freezing) and doesn't smoke too bad it'll be alright. I bought it and then months later I found a reciept in a scribbler that the PO kept for over 10,000 dollars worth of motor work. Rebuilt?? No , not what I would call rebuilt, but rather an in frame. So when it comes to the term rebuilt, definitly take it with a grain of salt !  I also believe that my bus will have less miles on it than my car will over the next 10 years, so it is definitly possible to have an old bus with little conversion miles on it. Rather look for maintence issues, such as grease fittings, have they been lubricated? etc etc. If the bus has been maintained then the motor probably has been as well, if it starts right up sounds good, doesn't smoke too bad it'll probably be ok. With the price of buses beeing so cheap right now maybe a nice maintained bus with a weak motor might not be the end of the world anyway. There are elements to a converstion that cost as much as a "rebuilt engine anyway".

Grant
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buswarrior
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« Reply #19 on: November 03, 2009, 02:11:40 PM »

There seems to be a somewhat unspoken misunderstanding in this thread.

In all but a couple of exceptional cases, our 2 stroke buses have had MANY rebuilt engines since the factory. The engine in it now is just the latest one.

How would the dogbus get a 2 stroke bus to do 3 million miles?

Some have estimated the horribly under capitalized greyhound MC9 fleet was up over 5 million....

Same as any other vehicle purchase, you have to know the vehicle, or trust the seller, or spend some cash getting it evaluated by trustworthy professionals.

Or, have the cash to replace the major system problem.

rebuilt engine and numbers matching...two terms that make little sence and are a waste of ad space.

happy coaching!
buswarrior

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Hard Headed Ken
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« Reply #20 on: November 03, 2009, 06:32:30 PM »

I guess, I'm looking at the other side of this. I would rather buy a bus where everything else was in great shape and the engine was bad or worn out. Don't forget about brake shoes, brake drums, wheel bearings, air bags, air lines, brake chambers, king pins, shocks, tie rods, radius rod bushings, steering gear, transmission, differential, radiator, alternator, starter and who knows how many other things. To me, the engine is the easy thing to figure out. The cost of the other stuff could easly exceed the cost of an engine.

Ken
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josephgranzier
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« Reply #21 on: November 03, 2009, 06:56:22 PM »

Ken
well said  - all those "misc" sure do add up
not to count the time spent away
all the trips back to the shop

whew  -   

let me find that bus w/ documentation
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luvrbus
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« Reply #22 on: November 03, 2009, 07:03:54 PM »

You got that right Ken my son in law had his 4060 Allison go bad and W.W.Williams charged him over 14 grand to rebuild it.
Most of the time a engine can be repaired to run for years the secret is to find a mechanic and not a parts installer  


good luck
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busnut104
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« Reply #23 on: November 03, 2009, 07:50:22 PM »

I know it is possible, how about 10 year and less then 1000 mile on a new eng.
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kyle4501
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« Reply #24 on: November 04, 2009, 05:10:39 AM »

I know it is possible, how about 10 year and less then 1000 mile on a new eng.

Then I'd be concerned with dried up seals & o-rings.
Rubber doesn't like to sit still - it needs to be exercised to maintain it's best sealing properties. . . . Not to say you will have excessive leaks, but you should be aware that they are a possibility. . . .


Always something, no free lunch.

I don't place much faith in documentation. I believe the performance as I'm inspecting it & test driving it.

Past performance does not guarantee future results.  Sad
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luvrbus
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« Reply #25 on: November 04, 2009, 05:33:58 AM »

I am with you Kyle on the documentation, testing on all liquids not just the engine are your best friend and don't lie and be very cautious of a old bus with all new oils and coolant.     




good luck
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