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Author Topic: bus floor  (Read 4757 times)
JohnEd
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« Reply #30 on: November 09, 2009, 05:54:34 PM »

Bryan,

Had you used floating floor you would have run the risk of bad buckling if you had then built over it.

The professionals install the floor and then build on it.  Floating floor is NOT your only option.  You can install real hardwood floors and build on that unless I am mistaken.  The thin planking I have looked at is nailed in so how much do they expect it to move.  I tend to Hickory because it is so very hard but you have to work at getting any grain to show up.  Also, some of the hardwood floor is treated with a aluminum oxide finish that is not scratchable.....I know.  But it is tough.  Bad side of that is that you can't expect a match for a repair.  I would go for the unfinished wood and stain and finish it myself.  Without any obstructions the sanding and finishing process can be a down right pleasant and rewarding experience.  If you opt to finish the floor yourself get back in touch with me as I have a process that will give you a "hand rubbed" finish almost for free.  A hand rubbed floor is Bill Gates territory....me thinks.

My S&S had the carpet installed wall to wall and then the interior was put in over it.  Worked for Winnebago.

HTH,

John
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bryanhes
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« Reply #31 on: November 09, 2009, 06:41:48 PM »

John,

That is kind of what I was thinking to begin with. I thought It could be attached permanently until I started reading about leaving gaps for expansion and contraction. I know that the expansion joint is left in home applications and maybe that is for a floating floor system as I have seen real hardwood in old homes that were all nailed to the joists. So I would think that you could fasten to the subfloor in the bus. It sure would be allot quicker of a job to run the whole length before adding cabinets etc.. Although I would have to be more careful to not scratch the floor while finishing the conversion.

Thanks for the input,
Bryan
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JohnEd
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« Reply #32 on: November 09, 2009, 11:03:43 PM »

john grabe to Bus
show details 10:19 PM (42 minutes ago)
The beauty of real hardwood is that you can sand it out and refinish and match it.  also consider installing the floor in a herring bone down the center or some other "pattern" other than straight across.  Though straight across is beautiful when properly finished.

I will share with you the "secret".  Open a gallon can of Verithane and let it sit for a day  Pierce the hardened shell that forms on top and stir it up a little.  let it sit again till the top hardens  Repeat till the volume is reduced to 3/4 of the previous level.  The stuff should be really thick.  The previously hardened parts go back into solution after sitting to thicken the entire can.  Pour out a cup of Verithane on the floor and use a window squeegee to move it around till you "wet a patch and then slowly draw the "puddle down along the grain till it runs dry.  All the Verithane is left in the grain and the top is coated very thinly.  I repeat this 5 times and the floor is beautifully finished.  Instead of doing one long stretch I move the puddle across the width and then re squeegee the floor to get a uniform coat and leave NO HEAVILY COATED sections.  I used a dark stain to rub into the grain and I went over the oak to lighten the non grain high parts fo contrast.  After the varithane applications it looked like a million.  Use a "real" window squeegee that has a supple rubber strip and not the hard ones for automotive.

These posts are getting hung up in my Gmail.  Hope this all tracks....john
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
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robertglines1
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« Reply #33 on: November 10, 2009, 04:23:22 AM »

It seems that I have stirred up unneeded concern for expansion and contraction in the sub floor...I made a observation...My sub floor is screwed to the steel floor structure about every 6 to 8 inches thru both sheets of plywood and the 1/8 inch insulation material...I used granite squares which were attached by GE silicon caulk (like steel adhesion)to allow for expansion .In the factory conversions I don't know what they use..All the cabinets and any thing else is secured to the floor thru all layers...I live is sw Indiana or temps range from 0  to  100...put bus in sun and high outside temps could hit 120..I would put more weight to John's post he has many more hands on experience on this subject and has probably learned a lot of it the hard way...pay particular attention to what is said about the floating floor.In a MCI8 we built I didn't leave enough gap and in real cold weather it would buckle..you should not put anything that needs to be attached to the floor over a floating floor....Bolt Cabinets and the like down to the sub floor  Make them part of the structure!!very very very important unless you want them in your lap or back of your head....You know _hit happens.....Again I made a observation on the gap at the side never considered that after over 20yrs there could have been some shrinking..either way my bus sides are straight the floor is flat the cabinets (fastened to the floor) haven't moved..conversion is 6 yrs old.....everything is good....buses are great............
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FloridaCliff
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« Reply #34 on: November 10, 2009, 05:51:54 AM »

I was thinking about laying the flooring down first before adding cabinets but now that you mention it the wood floor would need room to expand and contract so fastening anything thru the wood flooring into the subfloor may not be a good idea?  Undecided I was just thinking it may be easier to lay the wood floor first instead of having to cut around everything.

Bryan

Bryan,

Don't do it....

Though it is easier now, what are you going to do if you get water damage or some other problem.

The so called pro's at the factory do it that way because its easier and cheaper, they are not concerned with anything after the initial sale.

In every step, think and plan with how I will replace, maintain or access this when I am done.   It will be time well spent.

Cliff
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« Reply #35 on: November 10, 2009, 09:38:54 AM »

The so called pro's at the factory do it that way because its easier and cheaper, they are not concerned with anything after the initial sale.

In every step, think and plan with how I will replace, maintain or access this when I am done.   It will be time well spent.

Cliff

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« Reply #36 on: November 10, 2009, 04:50:29 PM »

Someone, I believe it was Homegrowndiesel, took the planks from a flatbed trailer and put them down for the floor while the bus was empty.  I thought it was an interesting and rustic look.  Not a lot of cutting I don't believe. Maybe he will chime in.
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bryanhes
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« Reply #37 on: November 10, 2009, 05:04:38 PM »

Cliff,

That is a good point as well. You do never know when you may have to pull up flooring for a repair. I will have to give more thought to just fastening cabinets and other large items then flooring around them. Just have to be more precise in my cuts or use a good base trim if I screw up  Grin

Thanks for all the input. I do like the thought of a natural wood just not all the coats you have to apply.

Bryan

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JohnEd
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« Reply #38 on: November 10, 2009, 08:04:57 PM »

Brian,

I would estimate that the application of a single coat would take 30 minutes.  It is dry enuf in  4 hours for the next coat.  Just imagine that your floor is a giant window and you have to squeegee it off with a 18(24) inch window cleaner's squeegee.  I have only seen it demo'd but the one with the swivel head is trick and it will take a 6 foot pole.

I sanded mine with a DA autobody sander.  It flatened my oak floor in just a few minutes.  My wood floor is only 5 X 5 feet now mind you but I have a clear idea of what it is about.

I am not entirely sure "damage to the floor" is a valid consideration.  What do the flooring guys have to say about it?

Good luck,

John
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
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