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Author Topic: Single wide tires in place of duals  (Read 3524 times)
cody
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« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2009, 12:39:21 AM »

Our 1978 revcon came with single rear wheels, course it's front wheel drive but still the weight carrying is mainly in the back, the fronts are 10.20x31 and the back is a single axle 12.50x33 load range F, the 87 revcon came with tandem rear axles with 12.50x33 load range E.  The 1978 were originally bia ply tires, we switched it over to radials on the Budd rims without a problem.
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TomC
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« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2009, 07:16:03 PM »

Michelin has a new tread pattern out for the X-ones called XDN2-which is a syped (small manufactured cuts in the tread) tread pattern that has maximum traction in both dry, wet and snow.  Plus it rides well.  If my truck had had 11R-22.5's I would have switched to 455/55R-22.5's.  But-nobody is making a 11R-24.5 single tire replacement.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
cody
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« Reply #17 on: November 14, 2009, 05:28:00 AM »

Tom, I'm corn fused again you say nobody makes a 11R-24.5? Thats what I've got on my iggle, can you clarify that a little?
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Lonnie time to go
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« Reply #18 on: November 14, 2009, 05:45:59 AM »

I think Tom was referring to the Super Single in that size
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1976 4905
TomC
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« Reply #19 on: November 14, 2009, 08:16:10 AM »

Cody- I use 11R-24.5's on my bus and truck also-I just mentioned that nobody makes a super single replacement for the 11R-24.5, and they probably won't.  USA and maybe Australia are the only countries that uses 24.5's.  22.5's are the main stay of tire use now-and for good reason.  The smaller tires are cheaper, lighter, and carry as much as the 24.5's.  If I bought a new truck, I would definitely have the highway super singles on my rig, and just carry a mounted spare. 
On a big rig, if you run super singles on both the drivers and the trailer, you'll save about 600lbs and get 2-4% better fuel mileage.  Personally-don't know why everyone doesn't use them.  I know they are used almost exclusively in Europe since fuel prices are about double what we pay, and the truckers are trying to squeeze every drop out of their trucks.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
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« Reply #20 on: November 14, 2009, 07:11:15 PM »

those who run them will tell you they are unnoticeable from the driver's seat.

Gotta disagree.  I ran supersingles on a Freightliner, and noticed a significant drop in vibration at highway speed.

Consider that when you have two tires bolted together (duals), the slightest difference in diameter, tread pattern (or wear), pressure, etc will result in the two tires fighting each other every inch of the trip.

With a supersingle, you have ONE tire to balance and inflate, and ONE tread pattern.

If I were driving a big truck again, I would run supersingles.  I don't expect to run supers on my coach, because I want the option of swapping tires in case of problems.
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