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Author Topic: General Questions About Air Lines/Fittings  (Read 5626 times)
zubzub
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'53 4104. Roadworthy but rough around the edges.


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« Reply #30 on: December 12, 2009, 07:11:52 AM »

Sounds like you found a good shop.  $30/hr labour is as good as it gets.  If I could find that probably would get some stuff done.  A small aside is a used drum for 140 is not the best price in the world, but then again when the labour is coming that cheap you are way ahead.
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buswarrior
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« Reply #31 on: December 12, 2009, 07:47:40 AM »

zubzub, I wondered about that item as well, and $30 an hour is a GREAT shop rate, but we can't price out apples and oranges, as there may be other costs that were simply lumped into the used drum price.

That's why I'd like Depewtee to share the total for the bill and compare that against the total of the work done. How the shop built up the bill in order to continue being a viable enterprise is a huge variable between shops, the small bits not being my concern. It distracts from whether this was a good price for the whole.

For those not familiar with these matters, that used drum had to be removed by paid skilled labour in the moment, turn key, and was available right there. Removal of a good drum in a scrap yard situation costs a lot less, or it's your labour, if you pull it yourself.

There are costs to finding, going and fetching a cheaper one, and it has to be lifted in and out of the fetch vehicle... Forklift doesn't work well into the back of a Honda sedan?

And there would be extra paid time/effort for the wheel assembly to be reassembled with the replacement drum, it would have been pulled off in one piece (drum/hub/wheels/tires staying together) from the axle, with the expectation to put it back on again without the fuss.

When comparing shop prices to other options, since the economic viability of a coach conversion depends greatly on we busnuts being do-it-yourselfers, we cannot discount our time or the costs of keeping that old pick-up around to zero when comparing these numbers.

Paying someone else handsomely for some jobs does have a nice ring to it!!!

happy coaching!
buswarrior

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Frozen North, Greater Toronto Area
junkman42
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« Reply #32 on: December 12, 2009, 07:49:13 AM »

Brian, I live in laurel hill, call and or stop by.  eight three 0 six six 00 or six52 two800.  Is the plaace You went to for service on highway 90?  I noticed some buses parked on 90 traveling east on 90 from PNS.  Look forward to meeting You.  Regards John
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Depewtee
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« Reply #33 on: December 12, 2009, 11:26:08 AM »

Buswarrior - $3,084.04 parts, labor, and taxes.

Zubzub - The $140 for the brake drum included the drum, removing it from the old bus, and installing it on mine. 

Junkman42 - Great Time Tours is located at

455 Corday Street
Pensacola, Florida 32503
Local: (850) 476-0046
Toll Free: (800) 446-0886

Take the Brent Lane exit off of I-110, go west under the overpass and take a left at the first light.  You can see the shop and their buses really well from I-110, however if you are traveling south you will have passed by the exit before seeing them.

Although the total bill might at first appear high, I personally am very happy to pay the cost.  Everyone on this board was in agreement that the brake system was the one system I did not want to tackle myself.  Also, there was much more work done than repairing the brakes.  I am happy and highly recommend the shop - they were very professional and communicated with me very well throughout the process.

One more thing for convenience...  The service shop is located behind their "dispatch center."  The dispatcher center is open 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. seven days per week.  During non-shop hours you can drop your bus off and leave the keys with the dispatcher.  They will also let you leave payment with the dispatcher and pick up your bus during non-shop hours (although I chose to pick it up from the shop to talk more with the staff).  Also, I dropped my bus off on a Saturday morning while the shop was closed.  As I pulled in the gate I was met by a staff person who lives on site.  He described himself as security/technician/driver.  I felt very comfortable leaving my bus at the shop.

Brian S.
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Brian Shonk
Fort Walton Beach, FL (Florida Panhandle)
1981 Prevost LeMirage Liberty Coach
1984 TMC MC-9
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« Reply #34 on: December 12, 2009, 06:49:42 PM »

That bill is not high.

Remember, the new replacement cost for that asset is over half a million dollars.

You have invested a very modest sum in the mechanical upkeep of an expensive and complex machine.

As far as I'm concerned, you got great value for your money, and left feeling well taken care of.

That was a lot of work, and if anything else had been noticeably wrong, it would have been found.

For roughly $77 a foot, and the coach away for only a short while, you go down the road with a much more secure feeling.

How long would it take some of us to plow through a list that long?

I'd burn through several weekends, and be hung up at certain stages with no parts, and have to run around during the week collecting them.
Time I do not have.

Money well spent!

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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zubzub
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« Reply #35 on: December 13, 2009, 06:23:06 AM »

yup sounds like a good deal, the only problem is you got ripped off 'cause you didn't get to spend 4 weekends filthy on your back, banging your head on stuff and skinning your knuckles, running around looking for parts and all the other good feelings associated with DIY bus repairs and maintenance:).  Also no dirty looks from your SO for spending so much time away.  You really got the short end of the stick. Wish I had a shop like that near me, I could do with some of that pain.
On another more serious note, watch out you don't roll off the ends of those run up blocks, and you need bigger chocks for the wheels.
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Depewtee
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« Reply #36 on: December 13, 2009, 06:54:08 AM »

Zubzub - I have been wondering how to best chock my bus when it is on the ramps.  For now, I have been placing 4"x4" chocks/blocks on either side of the front tires.  I am hesitant about this arrangement and would appreciate any suggestions.  Here are a few options I have seen on the Internet.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.


Brian S.
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Brian Shonk
Fort Walton Beach, FL (Florida Panhandle)
1981 Prevost LeMirage Liberty Coach
1984 TMC MC-9
Busted Knuckle
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6 Setras, 2 MCIs, and 1 Dina. Just buses ;D


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« Reply #37 on: December 13, 2009, 09:49:15 AM »

Brian,
In my honest opinion you got a great deal, and have found great shop to work with!
I especially like the labor rate, and it seems they are very customer friendly!
If I were you I'd keep in touch and use them from time to time even if it's just an annual oil change & service, with a overall safety inspection.  A good shop is a great thing to have on your side when ugly problems arise. They will take into account that you are a "regular customer" and they will be comfortable working on your coach because they have gotten to know you.

The price of the brake drum is not that bad considering that it includes labor off the donor and onto your bus! (If it were just the drum it would not be that great)

They price of a "service" (oil change and greasing) is quite reasonable!

I'm glad to hear of your positive experience with them. I have seen their shop and buses from time to time while down in the Pensacola area, and am glad to know they are a good place to deal with if I ever have a bus or customer in need help in the area!
Grin  BK  Grin
« Last Edit: December 13, 2009, 09:58:14 AM by Busted Knuckle » Logged

Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
Busted Knuckle
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« Reply #38 on: December 13, 2009, 10:05:54 AM »

Zubzub - I have been wondering how to best chock my bus when it is on the ramps.  For now, I have been placing 4"x4" chocks/blocks on either side of the front tires.  I am hesitant about this arrangement and would appreciate any suggestions.  Here are a few options I have seen on the Internet.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.


Brian S.


Brian,
FWIW I prefer #1!
The rubber ones are ok, but they will mash down with enough pressure on them. I seen them tear, rip or break up from being "accidentally" driven over, or drug by the chocked wheel.
I have several of each of #'s 2, 3 & 5 that all are now only good as chew toys for my kids now because of this! Grin
Grin  BK  Grin
YMMV just my honest opinion!
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
JohnEd
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« Reply #39 on: December 13, 2009, 11:11:43 AM »

Brian,

I remember a Knut saying that he put his "stop chock" an appropriate distance behind his "front wheel" when backing up his ramp and the same distance in front of his front wheel when pulling forward up onto the ramp.  I think that even if you had a nice tall stop at the rear of the ramp that if you bumped into it you would rock the ramp over.  One Knut made ramps like yours but he made a steep ramp off the back not to ever drive down on purpose but to not have the ramp rock over if he stabbed the brake when he was near the end of the ramp or accidentally drove off the back.  That kinda made sense to me as the increase in weight would be to an item that was NOT really portable anyway.....movable at best and for me, at this stage, by someone else..

Good luck and thank you for starting a most excellent topic.

John
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Cary and Don
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« Reply #40 on: December 13, 2009, 05:34:01 PM »

$30.00 an hour?Huh  We can't find anything under $90.00 in Sacramento.  We went to one shop to have some slack adjusters installed.  They went on to say we needed an air leak fixed, a valve replaced, a wheel seal replaced.  When the estimate went over $5K,  we left and did it ourselves.

Don and Cary
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charlie
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« Reply #41 on: December 13, 2009, 05:52:49 PM »

couple years ago i had  my bothe buses rebuilt and the gentleman charged me 35.00 hr  and just the cost of the parts with no markup he was a 74 year 2cycle guy owned his own shop over 50 years he just loved workining on them  great wealth of knowledge sadley he passed away..
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