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Author Topic: Exhaust blankets?  (Read 4121 times)
johns4104s
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« on: December 01, 2009, 05:29:47 AM »


I should receive my S&W Turbo back and install it mid Dec. I was thinking about adding exhaust blankets. I know it will keep the heat down in the engine room but in doing so I see it shooting the internal exuahst pipe temperatures way up. Does this very high internal temperature negatively effect the life or the performance of the exaust piping?

John
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luvrbus
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« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2009, 05:56:26 AM »

John, I have the blankets on the manifold, piping and the turbo hot housing never been a problem in 15 years the piping looks new they force the heat to the turbo making for a little more turbo performance and they are a good  safety factor also.
Don Fairchild along with others sell those give him a call for a price but sit down first they are not cheap like the exhaust tape.
Great thing about buying from Don he knows what fits for your engine that way no need for the measurnents and the questions and answer thing with other suppliers  



good luck
« Last Edit: December 01, 2009, 06:13:53 AM by luvrbus » Logged

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johns4104s
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« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2009, 08:12:08 AM »

Cliff,

In my old field we would wrap pipe welds, pressure vessel welds etc, and heat them up to 1100/2200 deg f, With no insulation we would never have made temperature. The saying in the industries is You Can Stress Relieve with a candle if your insulation is good.

I feel better knowing you feel its not detrimental to the exhaust piping,

John




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JohnEd
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« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2009, 11:47:38 AM »

I can second what Cliff says.  No damage and better power and MPG.  The trick words are "cooling the gas reduces the velocity and increase the resistance to flow"....bad.  Exhaust systems rot out from the inside, anyway.

I have read testimonials by users that said that they can work in their engine bay after pulling off the highway.  To me that is preposterous but so many have said it I have to believe it is that good.  Sure would cool the bedroom down.

Try GOOGLE ing it, John

John
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« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2009, 01:36:41 PM »

are the manifolds (obviously not the actual cast manifolds but the tubular piping up to the turbo) made of stainless or mild steel?  Also, is there a picture anywhere of the blankets?  How do they differ from the wrap material I use on some headers?  FWIW wrapping mild steel headers is a sure way to get new ones every couple of years, they just kill the first 6" of the primary tubes on a race engine.  Also, having new systems ceramic coated inside and out is a very good way to keep temperatures down, it really keeps the heat inside the tube.  Anyone done that to a bus exhaust system?

Brian
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« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2009, 01:48:43 PM »

Thanks, reminds me to put mine back on. Grin
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luvrbus
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« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2009, 02:25:34 PM »

Brian, mine came from ATP www.atpwrap.com and yes mine covers the regular cast manifold.


good luck
« Last Edit: December 01, 2009, 02:28:06 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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JohnEd
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« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2009, 02:38:09 PM »

Brian,

I am clueless as to why the first six inches would rot.  The info I have says that mild steel is not affected but you cannot wrap Stainless Steele.  Why?....dunno.

Ceramic coating the "inside" and outside is a superb idea.  It was all in vogue many years ago but the shops would only do the outside.

Gas engine exhaust is hotter than diesel....right?

I have seen many ex manifolds wrapped right along with the turbo housing and pipes.  The "blanket wrap" is soaked in water and that makes it more like wet cardboard, I am told.  After molding it to the manifold and threading SS wires around it the engine is started and run to temp. The Wrap gets hard and precisely matches the item it was wrapped around.  Fantastic stuff and is ceramic based.  Cost like the dickens but a hands down proved performer.

And it would be an opportunity to deal with Don Fairchild.  He has done a lot for us.

John
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
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luvrbus
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« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2009, 02:59:38 PM »

JohnEd, we are talking about 2 different systems mine is not the tape wrap go to web site I posted and take a look.


good luck
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JohnEd
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« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2009, 05:09:02 PM »

Cliff,

I understood you correctly.  Sorry if my post was vague on that.  The ATP stuff looks just like "wet wrap".  Wet Wrap is a thick blanket like stuff, just like ATP....from what I can see and remember.  Are they all that different?  Guess i should look up WET WRAP on the web.

Thanks and sorry for the confusion,

John
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
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« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2009, 05:50:31 PM »

There are pro's and con's with "wraps"   

As Clifford mentioned by keeping the "exhaust gases" hotter> has more energy  available to turn the turbine wheel.   This will spool the turbocharger quicker thus making more engine torque sooner vs later.    However, while the engine is running no harm is done to any of the components>engine or turbocharger.    But having a hot shut down with little idle time will cause a rapid transfer of heat from the turbine housing into the bearing housing.   Since most do not run synthetics oil breakdown and coking will occur.   

The safety benifits outweigh the negatives.    If you can't wait 2 minutes to shut the engine down to wick the heat out of the turbine housing >>the life of the turbo will be reduced.    Turbochargers that have water cooled bearing housing do not need to worry about this as much..   Marine and industrial engines with water cooled  exhaust manifolds are exempt from any of the shut down damage.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2009, 06:17:10 PM »

Kevin, that is a good point I always idle mine for 2 or 3 minutes before shutdown after a long run it's a carry over that followed me to the bus world from the Cat equipment I have owned over the years.


good luck
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Eagle Andy
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« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2009, 06:19:50 PM »

I have a ? for clifford, I have the manfold blankets on mine . However I do not have them on the pips leading to the turbo. is that something I need to consider.
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luvrbus
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« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2009, 06:34:26 PM »

Thats strange Andy maybe the PO lost the rest of the set or was buying in pcs manifold covers don't do much good.
I do rembemer when he was converting your bus Dave Galey had a manifold blow out and caused a fire in his bus and everyone was rushing out to buy the covers.
Call Don and see what the other 4 pcs will cost you they do make a difference.
To bad a 6v92 set won't work for you there is a red Eagle here with a set in the bay and I know Van would not miss them LOL  


good luck
« Last Edit: December 01, 2009, 06:36:44 PM by luvrbus » Logged

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Eagle Andy
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« Reply #14 on: December 01, 2009, 06:39:29 PM »

Well heck Clifford , Thats ok I can always trade for ones the fit a real DD lol just kidding Van  Grin
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