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Author Topic: Any tricks for using a Drill Doctor?  (Read 1491 times)
belfert
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« on: July 26, 2006, 06:05:12 PM »

Okay, I bought a Drill Doctor on the advice of Gumpy.  So far, it isn't worth the $110 I spent on it.  I would be far ahead with $110 worth of drill bits at this point.

Any tips for using this thing?

So far all I have done is basically turned four drill bits into scrap.  The angles aren't right, and in some cases the bits had chunks out of them.  I reread the manual and quit putting any pressure on the bits during sharpening, but the bits are still flat at the very tip instead of pointed.  I did try calling Drill Doctor, but they were closed as I expected.

Brian elfert
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Ray D
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« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2006, 06:55:51 PM »

No tricks,
My drill doctor sharpens them better than new and it should have came with a video and directions.  If you did not buy a faulty unit, it is just getting the steps down. It is the best sharpener I have ever had.

Ray D
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Dallas
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« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2006, 07:56:06 PM »

Okay, I bought a Drill Doctor on the advice of Gumpy.  So far, it isn't worth the $110 I spent on it.  I would be far ahead with $110 worth of drill bits at this point.

Any tips for using this thing?

So far all I have done is basically turned four drill bits into scrap.  The angles aren't right, and in some cases the bits had chunks out of them.  I reread the manual and quit putting any pressure on the bits during sharpening, but the bits are still flat at the very tip instead of pointed.  I did try calling Drill Doctor, but they were closed as I expected.

Brian elfert

Brian, which Model Drill Doctor do you have?
The higher end models let you adjust the angle from >118° to over 135°
Mine does a really great job bringing back bits I've broken off, dulled and generally been hard on.
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belfert
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« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2006, 08:12:09 PM »

Brian, which Model Drill Doctor do you have?
The higher end models let you adjust the angle from >118° to over 135°
Mine does a really great job bringing back bits I've broken off, dulled and generally been hard on.

I bought the high end 750X model.  I haven't watched the video due to lack of DVD player.  I suppose I should get the DVD in the my PC working.

Brian Elfert
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Skykingrob
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« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2006, 08:25:01 PM »

Hi Brian
I too have a drill doctor. I ruined 2 bits right off the start because I didn't follow the instructions to the letter. I then reread them about 4 times. After that, I can sharpen bits nearly as good as new. One trick I did learn. It tells you to rotate the bit in the holder bracket an even number of times. That is true but what they don't tell you is that you have to rotate the bit a lot of times. For example, a 1/4" bit in my hands may take rotating 30-40 times to get it sharp. You can tell when you have rotated the bit enough because the typical grinding noise will disappear the closer to sharp it is. But remember to keep the number of rotations even, i.e 20, 30, 40, etc.
BTW, I read about the motivation issue. Alot of good advise there. The only thing I didn't see was to refocus on why you bought the bus in the first place. Why did you buy it?  Wink What were(are) your plans?  Undecided One thing also to think about, it takes on average about 1 year for a bus company to build a bus. If they have tons of resources(money, tools and people) available what makes you think that you can do your build out in less time with limited resources?  Huh I suggest you reset your goal of when the bus is to be done. I started with mine as a 5 year project. I am 2 years into it, not as far along as I would like but I still have 3 years to go, so the pressure isn't consuming. For me at least, I spend about 60% of project time on thinking about how I am going to do it, 20% rethinking after the first 60% didn't work like I wanted and then 10% completing the project. Yours and others maybe different but maybe not. Anyway fellow busnut, I was given this saying and maybe just maybe it will help you: "If you want to achieve something that others don't, you must do things that others won't". Good Luck  Grin

Rob
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rv_safetyman
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« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2006, 09:11:45 PM »

Hi Brian.

I have had a Drill Doctor for several years.  I get mixed results.  I have found that I have to hand grind the relief, since my unit does not seem to do a good job in that area.  I have long since lost my instructions and they did not offer a video at the time.  It is possible that I am not operating the unit properly.  However, sometimes I get great results after one or two grinds.  Sometimes it takes many grinds and even then it does not seem to work well. 

It is probably my imagination, but it seems like I have to really put the pressure to the bit before it starts cutting the first time.  After that, it seems to operate with reasonable pressure.

I went to:  http://www.drilldoctorstore.us/drilshar.html and it looks like you can watch the video on line.  I did not have time to view tonight, but I will try to do that in the next few days.   I also noted that they have change the design of the unit significantly from my unit. 

Has anyone tried both units?  Same results?
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Jim Shepherd
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« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2006, 05:01:27 PM »

Brian,

I "feel" that I understand your problem.  I have used a friends D Dr. and it is fantastic.  He had had it for almost a year in his professional metal fabrication shop and had used it maybe once.  He is one of those people that can take a grinder to a bit and get it sharpened up enough to use.  He is talanted and full of experience.  He would never admit this but he had spotty results with the $140 tool.  I can do anything but I need the book.  I read the book and it seemed to have things in it that I didn't feel comportable with.  The thing that I clued in on quickly was the original chucking of the bit.  You have to insert the bit and and turn it gently until the little metal fingers engage the flutes of the bit.  Try ti gently turn the bit until it feels like it hit a groove and let it rest there.  This step will determin what part of the end of the bit you are going to grind off.  It should be a FLAT and not a GROOVE. When you have found that point, the bit should be sticking out of the assembly too far.  gently "SNUG" the chuck slightly before you insert the assemble in the original DEAPTH gauge.  After you gently push the assembly into the deapth gauge, you then tighten up the chuck.

If the bit was broken or really dull you will have a finished bit with a flat spot for a tip.  You then repeat the process.  If it wasn't baddly abused you will only have to go through the sharpening sequence once and that should take a minute a bit if you are fast.

The other thing is how much pressure.  It is a diamond stone and will tolerate a lot considering its size.  You can spend a lot of time on a very dull bit being to light.  ALWAYS hit it the same number if times on each face.

I had one failure out of hundreds.  The "twist rate" was not standard, but close.  No matter what I did it produced a bit without enuf relief.  That one just spun on the material.  One out of hundreds.  They aren't letting me forget that ONE either.  By their reasoning I am a ROOKIE bit sharpener.  Thts ok cuz I have three indexes of my own bits and they are all sharp as razors.  Yeah, Drill Dr.

Hope this helped

John
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« Reply #7 on: July 29, 2006, 05:07:29 PM »

Guys, just make darned sure the the thumbscrew on the right side of the drill Dr. is locked on the right angle...it shows up in the window on the left side of the machine.  Whether you select 118 or 135 degrees is dependent on the work you're doing.  But LOCK that thumbscrew!

I don't use the side grinding feature...'splitting the point' because I'm mostly drilling hard metals.

I don't count the number of turns...when it's not removing any more metal...it's even.  Just try and apply even pressure on every rotation.

Bob
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belfert
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« Reply #8 on: July 29, 2006, 05:49:30 PM »

Guys, just make darned sure the the thumbscrew on the right side of the drill Dr. is locked on the right angle...it shows up in the window on the left side of the machine.  Whether you select 118 or 135 degrees is dependent on the work you're doing.  But LOCK that thumbscrew!

No matter how tight I get the thumbscrew, it still likes to move over time.  I keep having to reset it.

Brian Elfert
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