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Author Topic: wood working guys  (Read 2062 times)
robertglines1
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« on: December 20, 2009, 10:28:40 AM »

I Have some 60 year old cherry planks 1"by1 1/2" how should I fasten them without damaging them? What about finishing them to get that rich look?
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
bevans6
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« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2009, 10:47:26 AM »

1" by 1 1/2" is an odd size.  How long are your pieces? what are you planning to do with them?  What are you planning to fasten them to?  Finishing cherry is interesting - it changes colour rapidly when exposed to sunlight, gets dark and rich coloured. 

Brian
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robertglines1
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« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2009, 10:53:48 AM »

Planks are about 4 ft long...Planning on using for cabinets or trim on cabinets...tried to hammer nail in piece and it split....that was 10 yrs ago...seems I should use for something?
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
Sam 4106
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« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2009, 11:09:50 AM »

Hi Robert,
For fastening cabinet face frames together and fastening the face frames to the cabinet boxes I use a Kreg pocket hole jig and glue. For cabinet door rails and stiles I just use glue at the corners and let the panels float.
Good luck, Sam 4106/MC8
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« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2009, 11:20:10 AM »

For cabinet rails it is a little small, if you use overlay style doors it will require around 1 3/4 for the 1/2 inch overlay on each door and the hinges pretty much eat up the extra unless you use an inset door then the 1 1/2 will work, dry cherry is prone to splintering as you already found out, one way to get around that is to use hardwood nails, they are a hardened nail thats thinner, you can put one in a drill and spin in a pilot hole for them or drill and dowel them in place, also kreg screws work well but also have a tendancy to split the wood unless your very careful on the tightening. For a finish, oil works very well on cherry and gives it a deep finish, put a sheepskin polishing bonnet on a drill and spin the finish out after applying the oil with a rag, if you can get the drill fast enough to warm or even heat up the wood you'll sink the oil deeply into the wood and give it an antique patina, tung oil works well for that but requires several coats, the advantage to that is that if you scratch the finish at some future point, a little oil on a cloth rubbed into the wood repairs the scratch.
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robertglines1
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« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2009, 11:48:50 AM »

will the cherry plane and mill ok? linseed oil work?
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
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« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2009, 12:35:49 PM »

Yep, cherry planes and mills great, I used to even use a bridgeport for a lot of the hardwoods, it works great but make sure you dial up the speed on it, and yep it'll work but doesn't dry fast.
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bevans6
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« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2009, 01:49:31 PM »

Cherry is known for tough grain and tear-out when planing with an actual plane - sharp blade, small mouth, pay attention to direction.  It's kind of a brittle wood, not all that strong.

I was thinking that if I had what you have I might be tempted to find a project where I could resaw it to about 1/2" and use it for trim around panelling and such.  I did my kitchen cabinets in cherry frames and bright maple fields.  As the cherry ages it gets more dramatic.

Brian

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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
Vintage race cars -
1978 Lola T440 Formula Ford
1972 NTM MK-4 B/SR
cody
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« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2009, 02:30:51 PM »

I've had excellent luck working with cherry, the key is to use sharp tools and for machining the wood to keep the speed up, but thats the key with any hardwood, for maple or any other tight grained wood like cherry, I won't run a router at less than 25K, oak at 30k, for a planer only a 3 blade, never a two blade unless you can dial the speed up.  Watch the grain direction as with any wood. Always leave room for a finishing pass thats going to be a very thin cut.
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bevans6
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« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2009, 05:29:13 PM »

What speed do you run your Stanley No 4 at?

 Shocked

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
Vintage race cars -
1978 Lola T440 Formula Ford
1972 NTM MK-4 B/SR
cody
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« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2009, 05:31:30 PM »

I cheat, I sprang for the power tools lol, about 30 years ago.
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bevans6
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« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2009, 05:48:04 PM »

I still pull out my grand-dad's 1902 Stanley #4 whenever I need to smooth or shape a bit of wood.  I have at least 15 solid user hand planes.  when I make a table, I usually glue up the top and then it's typically 6 to 8 feet long by 3' wide, and I smooth them top and bottom with hand planes.  The last table i made was a dining room table made from solid southern yellow pine, 8/4 by 14" planks, all from one tree.  The top had only three planks.  The only metal fasteners in the whole table were 6 screws that held the cleats that kept the top from moving on the base.  It was gorgeous.  I made it for a friend of mine that sadly was critically ill with a brain tumour.  she had it for about a year.

I have the power tools too, but first grab is always a hand plane.  There is usually one in my tool belt...

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
Vintage race cars -
1978 Lola T440 Formula Ford
1972 NTM MK-4 B/SR
cody
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« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2009, 05:53:03 PM »

I'm always eager to learn from others.  Wood can be so complex at times lol.
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robertglines1
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« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2009, 04:33:16 AM »

 Thanks guys....right now my island cabinet is pretty sad in appearance. This is a hobby for me and a learning experience,now is the time to learn the finer part of wood working. expect more questions;some will seem basic to experienced wood specialist...those questions will be educational to me and others..now for computer skills (no hope there)
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
cody
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« Reply #14 on: December 21, 2009, 07:04:08 AM »

I thought your island looked pretty good, what all are you changing on it.  If you keep adding things and changing things around it'll turn into a prevo.
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robertglines1
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« Reply #15 on: December 21, 2009, 07:10:57 AM »

O  no!!!!   Just that cabinets are painted now and not what Judy thinks is ....
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
cody
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« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2009, 07:23:59 AM »

Oh ok, are you going to pop the facings off and keep the casework and replace the facings and doors and drawer fronts or a complete redo.
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Runcutter
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« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2009, 08:43:42 AM »

Robert, there's a Woodcraft store in Evansville, according to their store locator.  You might find a visit worthwhile.  I'm a regular (2-3 times a week) at the Dallas store, where all of the employees are woodworkers.  There's a fairly large group of us, amateur/semipro/professional woodworkers, that drop in frequently (think the old cracker barrell/domino game at the general store), to discuss our current projects and learn from each other.  

When I built the dining table for the 4107, curly maple and walnut, resawn and book-matched.  I designed it with raised leaves (instead of dropped leaves), and breadboard ends.  The raised leaves go up for access to the seats, drop down for dining.  I don't know how many times I dropped in with a status report, and a request for suggestions on specifics. 

If the Evansville store is at all akin to the Dallas store (and Merrillville, Indiana when I dropped in there), there will be a wealth of knowledge.  The courses are highly worthwhile, not only for the content (which side of the board do you face out on cabinet door rails and stiles, and why), but for how to fix mistakes.

The last piece I built, a church podium, had about 4 "mistakes" in the final product, all hidden because of what I learned in the classes I've taken.

Arthur
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Arthur Gaudet    Carrollton (Dallas area) Texas 
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cody
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« Reply #18 on: December 21, 2009, 09:23:15 AM »

Now I'm impressed, over the years I think I can count on one hand the people that know what side of a board to face out on the rails and stiles of a door, most feel that the width of the piece is small enough to not worry about anything.  My grandfather was the ultimate master cabinetmaker to me, we all idolize our grandparents to a certain degree but now and then I still find furniture he had built years ago at auction or for sale and I've even seen a few pieces in museums around the area, to me he was the best of the best, he's been gone now since the 60's but I still remember his shop vividly, OSHA whould have had a field day in it lol, it was powered by what I think was a model A or model T engine with a manual clutch that he would throw by hand to fire it up, there was a long shaft running the length of the shop along the ceiling and had wide belts that he would flip over the pulleys by hand to power a certain tool. He even had a forge in the corner cause now and then he would have to pour another babbit bearing for one of the tools, my job was to fill the oil cups in the morning and as they needed it thru out the day, what little I know about wood, I learned in that shop from him and my dad.
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robertglines1
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« Reply #19 on: December 21, 2009, 11:04:37 AM »

Just new pretty work will leave design alone; she likes that.Besides its something to do and another thing to learn...will check out Woodcraft store..would easily take classes..
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Bob@Judy  98 XLE prevost with 3 slides --Home done---last one! SW INdiana
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