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Author Topic: Sattellite Recievers  (Read 3820 times)
Ericbsc
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« on: December 27, 2009, 10:36:31 AM »

Time for either an antenna, or satellite for the bus. what works best. We have dish network at home. Do the in motion systems work well?
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« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2009, 10:54:47 AM »

I didn't have good luck with dish and an in motion king dome

so now I have Direct in the bus and Dish at home

I think the problem was the multiple sats that dish uses.

Melbo
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« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2009, 11:05:11 AM »

If you want the ugly things on top of your bus the in motion or any dome have problems with weather.
For the difference in price I would go with a automatic stationary using only when parked.
I never saw a in motion work great here in the West they are always hunting a signal driving down the highways and if you want one for HDTV they are big bucks 


good luck
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« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2009, 11:22:43 AM »

I just installed a wingaurd automatic stationary unit about 2 months ago with the dish receiver from the house, we live in pa and just went to Disney in Florida and had no problems finding the satelite's along the way. A good friend of mine has a in-motion and say es all it does is search for signals, For the way we travel we had no reason to get the in-motion one. Just my experience so far. Jason
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« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2009, 12:18:58 PM »

Give Bob a call, he might still have it. It's a great price and unit too.

http://www.busconversions.com/bbs/index.php?topic=14193.0

We have an older in motion Tracvision LM, works great when parked, haven't tried it in motion yet. We bought it used from my buddy Sonnie Gray as he went with one from Dish, ours is DirecTv. The dome does mess up the signal when it rains, not bad but a PITA sometimes. I've heard of people who have used RainX on it or just a fresh coat of non metallic paint. I'm waiting for wamer weather to do ours.

We have plenty of warts on the roof, so it kinda blends in. Roll Eyes

If I was going to do it over, I'd go with a portable setup. Plant the tripod in the ground, aim it and you're good to go. It's also the cheapest.

Paul
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James77MCI8
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« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2009, 02:07:51 PM »

I do not have an in motion. I have a direct TV antenna mounted on a tripod. I take a receiver from the house when we are taveling. When we reach our destination I take the tripod mounted dish out and aim it and sit back and enjoy the show. With this set up I do not have to pay for and additional subscription and/or receiver or fees.
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« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2009, 03:12:23 PM »

Hi, we have in motion. If you travel a lot, then that is the way to go. If not, one that automatically finds the signal at site works good. We had trouble with our in motion last time out, so, instead of being without tv, we took the in motion off, and put a portable one on that finds the signal. Hooked right up to the same bolts, and works great. It looks a little funny, cause it is a lot smaller, but works good.
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« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2009, 03:15:06 PM »

James

I would expect you to have both dish and direct

Both in motion and stationary

Both roof mount and a tripod for the ground

and Both digital and analog tvs

Just my observation

Melbo
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« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2009, 05:10:16 PM »

Hi Guy's,

Here is KVH's latest kit for reciving HD in your RV with Direct TV.
http://www.kvh.com/pdf/HDTV_LM_Bro_11.05.pdf

I still think KVH's A-7  5" high unit is King... Just my opinion!

Happy New Year
Nick-
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James77MCI8
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« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2009, 07:10:24 PM »

Hey Melbo...you are talking about my concept bus . I will add that to the specs. ...LOL
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« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2009, 05:04:49 AM »

My bus came with an older in motion KVH system which worked when stationary but could not lock onto the satellites when on the road. I replaced the unit with a new version (the old one had a cracked dome and had let water in) prior to our fall trip.

Some observations over a 5 week, 4000 mile trip are; picks up signals while on the road but very frustrating to watch anything. Every overhead sign, bridge, low hanging branches blocks the signal so the picture and sound had intermittent drop outs. Driving Eastbound on interstates, the in motion is almost useless (the trees lining the side of the interstate block the signal). Westbound lanes are better unless there are trees in the median. Traveling North and South the signal is much better and is mostly usable.

The other big problem we had was 60% of the campgrounds we visited were heavily wooded and the satellite was useless. While we were in Lake George, NY, we switched campgrounds twice and moved locations to try and get a signal with no luck.

If I were to do it over, I would not worry about the in motion part and get a portable unit so I could use it in the parks.

Paul
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« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2009, 05:45:55 AM »

Eric,
      I need to jump on board to get some input on regular tv antennas. Thinking that we might not use satelite while out & about visiting various campgrounds, etc. this year what about the wind up manual or automated local station antennas. Can someone give advice on these types like the Wineguard with batwing for picking up the hd signals? Is it also common for campgrounds to have cable? 
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« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2009, 05:56:39 AM »

We also have a Winegard, Sensar with Batwing. It does very well picking up locals. We watch it more than the Sat! Go figure! Roll Eyes



Paul
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« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2009, 06:12:04 AM »

We've also got the batwing antenna that we used up to this past summer, we added direct tv to jamies house and then got an extra reciever for 5 bucks a month, while the guy was here installing everything i asked him if he would sell me an extra HD dish cause we were haveing him set up the direct HD at the time so he said sure and dug out an HD dish, oval with the multiple LNB's, I went to goodwill and bought a wineguard roof tripod for a regular antenna and a 2 ft lenght of pipe from lowes and i was in business.  The tryout on it all was at BK's rally, some guys with direct tv showed me how to aim the dish the first time and from then it got really easy, so for 5 bucks a month additional we have direct tv in the bus, I paid 50 bucks for the extra HD dish and 10 bucks for the tripod.
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« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2009, 06:30:00 AM »

John9861 and Eric if you want a good TV antenna buy yourself a Glomex marine omni unit it cost a little more but well worth the price difference between it and a Winegard Bat Wing brand and no cranking up and down and turning to find a station.
And tree limbs and power lines are hell on a bat wing don't ask how I know that LOL
I have had my Glomex for years and love it if you can get any kind of signal turn the adjustable amplifier up and it will bring the picture in crystal clear

good luck
« Last Edit: December 28, 2009, 07:13:22 AM by luvrbus » Logged

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Eagle Andy
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« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2009, 09:51:02 AM »

Hey Cliffford can you use the glomex system with out running new wires or do you have to use there wires . Don't want to tear up my head liner. ?
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« Reply #16 on: December 28, 2009, 10:51:50 AM »

I didn't check, but is it good for digital? I heard that an Omni doesn't do that good, that's why I bought the Winegard. I'm sure someone will correct me, right Clifford? Grin

Digital is very directional, from my experience.

Paul
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« Reply #17 on: December 28, 2009, 10:57:01 AM »

Paul, mine was installed years before the digital stuff was mandated I have a new one on order now for digital. 
It does do a good job but the newer models I am told have better TV and radio reception for the digital market.


good luck
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« Reply #18 on: December 28, 2009, 11:37:31 AM »

Paul,

My Wein was VERY directional and also very good at pulling in distant signals.  There is a little RF amp thing in mine that I thought was a gimmic but it actually works well.  I think that bat wing thing is the best option.

John
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« Reply #19 on: December 28, 2009, 09:46:15 PM »

When the over the air tv went digital it virtually killed roof antennas in our area, the only local station is about 100 miles away and the signal doesn't reach us anymore, I liked the batwing antenna on the bus tho it really did a great job but i'm not sure how it works now, I tryed it yesterday and as I suspected it won't pick up any of the signals it used to in this area, guess I'll stick with the dish.
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« Reply #20 on: December 29, 2009, 04:06:24 AM »

Cody,

Did you teach your TV the new channels, that's the only way the TV will recognize the signal. We used to get 3 or 4, now we get 6. If the signals are there it will find them. You might have to aim your wing in the direction the signal is coming from, that's the picky part.

Paul
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« Reply #21 on: December 29, 2009, 05:59:38 AM »

What I was told is that the signal won't reach this far, from what I'm hearing that the station can't get the signal beyond about 40 miles from the transmitter, we're about 100 miles. The station has since been picked up by charter, the local cable company, cause they just don't have the money to be able to get what they need to transmit the way distances they used to.  As far as teaching my tv any new things it's not very smart, it never got past the 3rd grade in electronics school.
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« Reply #22 on: December 29, 2009, 12:53:24 PM »

Which model Glomex do you reccomend?
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« Reply #23 on: December 30, 2009, 07:39:31 AM »

Clifford, There are different models. Which one do you think will work best?
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« Reply #24 on: December 30, 2009, 07:49:58 AM »

Hi Everyone!

This article recently circulated via Associate Press.

Broadcasters' woes could spell trouble for free TV

Dec 29, 8:54 AM (ET)

By ANDREW VANACORE

NEW YORK (AP) - For more than 60 years, TV stations have broadcast news, sports and entertainment for free and made their money by showing commercials. That might not work much longer.

The business model is unraveling at ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox and the local stations that carry the networks' programming. Cable TV and the Web have fractured the audience for free TV and siphoned its ad dollars. The recession has squeezed advertising further, forcing broadcasters to accelerate their push for new revenue to pay for programming.

That will play out in living rooms across the country. The changes could mean higher cable or satellite TV bills, as the networks and local stations squeeze more fees from pay-TV providers such as Comcast and DirecTV for the right to show broadcast TV channels in their lineups. The networks might even ditch free broadcast signals in the next few years. Instead, they could operate as cable channels - a move that could spell the end of free TV as Americans have known it since the 1940s.

"Good programing is expensive," Rupert Murdoch, whose News Corp. owns Fox, told a shareholder meeting this fall. "It can no longer be supported solely by advertising revenues."

Fox is pursuing its strategy in public, warning that its broadcasts - including college football bowl games - could go dark Friday for subscribers of Time Warner Cable, unless the pay-TV operator gives Fox higher fees. For its part, Time Warner Cable is asking customers whether it should "roll over" or "get tough" in negotiations.

The future of free TV also could be altered as the biggest pay-TV provider, Comcast Corp., prepares to take control of NBC. Comcast has not signaled plans to end NBC's free broadcasts. But Jeff Zucker, who runs NBC and its sister cable channels such as CNBC and Bravo, told investors this month that "the cable model is just superior to the broadcast model."

The traditional broadcast model works like this: CBS, NBC, ABC and Fox distribute shows through a network of local stations. The networks own a few stations in big markets, but most are "affiliates," owned by separate companies.

Traditionally the networks paid affiliates to broadcast their shows, though those fees have dwindled to near nothing as local stations have seen their audience shrink. What hasn't changed is where the money mainly comes from: advertising.

Cable channels make most of their money by charging pay-TV providers a monthly fee per subscriber for their programing. On average, the pay-TV providers pay about 26 cents for each channel they carry, according to research firm SNL Kagan. A channel as highly rated as ESPN can get close to $4, while some, such as MTV2, go for just a few pennies.

With both advertising and fees, ESPN has seen its revenue grow to $6.3 billion this year from $1.8 billion a decade ago, according to SNL Kagan estimates. It has been able to bid for premium events that networks had traditionally aired, such as football games. Cable channels also have been able to fund high-quality shows, such as AMC's "Mad Men," rather than recycling movies and TV series.

That, plus a growing number of channels, has given cable a bigger share of the ad pie. In 1998, cable channels drew roughly $9.1 billion, or 24 percent of total TV ad spending, according to the Television Bureau of Advertising. By 2008, they were getting $21.6 billion, or 39 percent.

Having two revenue streams - advertising and fees from pay-TV providers - has insulated cable channels from the recession. In contrast, over-the-air stations have been forced to cut staff, and at least two broadcast groups sought bankruptcy protection this year.
Fox illustrates the trend: Its broadcast operations reported a 54 percent drop in operating income for the quarter that ended in September. Its cable channels, which include Fox News and FX, grew their operating income 41 percent.

Analyst Tom Love of ZenithOptimedia said he expects the big networks will end the year with a 9 percent drop in ad revenue, followed by an 8 percent drop in 2010 and zero growth in 2011.

A small chunk of the ad revenue is being recouped online, where the networks sell episodes for a few dollars each or run ads alongside shows on sites such as Hulu. Media economist Jack Myers projects online video advertising will grow into a $2 billion business by 2012, from just $350 million to $400 million this year.

But that is not significant enough to make up for the lost ad revenue on the airwaves. Advertisers spent $34 billion on broadcast commercials in 2008, down by $2.4 billion from two years earlier, according to the Television Bureau of Advertising.

So rather than wait for the Internet to become a bigger source of income, the networks and local stations are mimicking what cable channels do: They're charging pay-TV companies a monthly fee per subscriber to carry their programming.

Since 1994, the Federal Communications Commission has let networks and their affiliates seek payments for including their programming in the pay-TV lineup. Not everyone demanded payments at first. Instead they relied on the broader audience that cable and satellite gave them to increase what they could charge advertisers.

The big networks also were content to let their broadcast stations essentially be subsidized by higher fees for the cable channels that fell under the same corporate umbrella. A pay-TV company negotiating with the Walt Disney Co., which owns ABC, is likely paying more for the ABC Family channel than it otherwise would, with the extra assumed to help Disney cover its costs for the ABC network broadcasts.
But over time - such contracts generally run about three years - more networks began demanding payments for the stations they own. And affiliates already receiving the fees have bargained for more money.

Some talks have been tense. In 2007, Sinclair Broadcast Group, which operates 32 network-affiliated stations around the country, pulled its signals for nearly a month from Mediacom Communications Corp., which provides cable TV to about 1.3 million subscribers, mainly in small cities.

The American Cable Association says its members - mainly small cable TV providers - have seen their costs for carrying local TV stations more than triple over the past three years. The group's head, Matt Polka, says those fees have gone "straight to consumers' pocketbooks" in the form of higher cable bills.

Gannett Co., for instance, which operates 23 stations, has taken in $56 million in fees from pay-TV operators this year after negotiating a new batch of agreements, up from $18 million in 2008. Dave Lougee, president of Gannett's broadcast arm, defends the fees, saying "broadcasters were late to the game in really starting to go after the fair market value of their signals."

Analysts estimate CBS managed to get as much as 50 cents per subscriber in its most recent talks with pay-TV providers that carry CBS-owned stations. CBS Corp. chief Leslie Moonves said such fees should add "hundreds of millions of dollars to revenues annually."
That could be just the beginning. CBS and Fox are also asking for a portion of the fees that their affiliates get, arguing that the networks' shows are what give local stations the leverage to ask for fees.

Over time, the networks might be able to get even more money by abandoning the affiliate structure and undoing a key element of free TV.
Here's why: Pay-TV providers are paying the networks only for the stations the networks own. That amounts to a little less than a third of the TV audience, which means local affiliates recoup two-thirds of the fees. If a network operated purely as a cable channel and cut the affiliates out, the network could get the fees for the entire pay-TV audience.

If forced to go independent, affiliates would have to air their own programming, including local news and syndicated shows.
Fitch Ratings analyst Jamie Rizzo predicts that at least one of the four broadcast networks "could explore" becoming a cable channel as early as 2011.

Any shift would take years, as the networks untangle complicated affiliate contracts. At an analyst conference last year, CBS's Moonves called the idea an "a very interesting proposition." But he added that it "would really change the universe that we're in."
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Brian Shonk
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cody
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« Reply #25 on: December 30, 2009, 08:03:53 AM »

The problem in our areas seems to be signal strength, the over the air broadcasts used to easily reach us in the past for our roof top antenna, now the extent seems to be limited to about 40 miles for the local station.  Anyone beyond that range like we are is just out of luck unless we want to have satalite or cable tv, free over the air tv in the fringe areas like here is already a past memory.
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« Reply #26 on: December 30, 2009, 08:12:34 AM »

Eric, I bought the v9112/ec about 180 bucks on sale with gain control to replace my old 9130 the Gx 9130 would be a good one if your planning on 4 TV's 



good luck
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« Reply #27 on: December 30, 2009, 09:34:22 AM »

2 years ago when I recoated the roof, I pulled my Omni and my batwing and donated them to Goodwill. In almost 10 years of fulltiming we never used them. If I can't get a signal on the sat 'WE' don't watch TV, simple as that. My 2 centavos, Will
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« Reply #28 on: December 30, 2009, 10:54:36 AM »

So times are tough and Rupert wants to get MORE MONEY.  Huh Now there is a shocker. Tongue  Well he immigrated and bought into this "free system" and nobody invited him.  Congress enacted a 100 million dollar tax break for him and then granted him citizenship without the oath so he was beholding to Newt from the git go and one has to wonder why he was so much the apple of the Newtster's eye in the first place Roll Eyes.  SUCK IT UP, RUPERT....you have to weather this storm just like the rest of us and after all, you and yours helped sell the "lost last decade" to the American people so this is a case of the chicken coming home.  NO NEW TAXES! Angry  Especially at the common mans expense to help the obscenely rich. Angry Angry Angry  Go ahead and go broke....I dare ya. Cool  You won't broadcast the new year's day college football events....the Rosebowl ?...Kidnapping and ransom is a capitol crime in the US of A you Limy Puke. Angry Angry


Whew!  I feel better.  How bout you guys?

John Grin Grin Grin
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The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
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