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Author Topic: MC-9 / 8V71 Woes  (Read 14730 times)
buswarrior
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« Reply #75 on: January 02, 2010, 10:38:46 PM »

oh phooey.

My suggestion is change the bleeping oil before you do any more theorizing.

If indeed you have 10Wxx whatever in there, it may be seeping past all manner of perfectly good seals that you will unwittingly think there is a problem.

Now, this "run away" event. We need more description of this event. There is a big difference between sticking throttle mechanisms on a coach that hasn't been run regularly, and an engine that is trying to run on lube oil.

Back to the first sentence. Change the oil, just for fun, find all the greasing points on the throttle rods and cranks from under the driver all the way to the back, confirm the emergency stop will function from the driver's seat, run it as prescribed earlier in the post, and see if everything else goes away.

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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JohnEd
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« Reply #76 on: January 03, 2010, 11:01:33 AM »

While you have all this time on your hands you might want to put together a couple of "ramps".  You cannot escape needing those.  Take them to Quartz with you.  Grease the thing everywhere.  Do you need to unweight the fronts to grease the King Pins?

John
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
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BlueScarecrow
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« Reply #77 on: January 03, 2010, 08:56:00 PM »

If I were going to grease the thing... I would take the weight off the front... yes!

I'm going to have a couple of ramps made out of oak and add a few oak 4x4's and maybe a square or two of 1" plywood.

Have you seen the chocks that go between the drive and the tag wheels? They go top and bottom and get pulled together for a nice tight fit so the wheels won't turn.

Ok... Ok... I'm going to change the oil this week. But I still think the blower seals are toast. Wink

Thanks for writing guys!


Mike
N9EWS

Ps. Who wants to hear a theory about gravity?
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1983 MCI / TMC MC-9 Crusader II - DD 8V71  Located in Scottsdale, AZ  85252

Do you think that's air you're breathing? - "The Matrix"
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« Reply #78 on: January 03, 2010, 09:15:47 PM »

Those are the best chocks ever.....I think.  I thought that should be intuitive but it doesn't seem so:  When you are pulling on the ramps put the chocks in line with the wheels at the end opposite of the chocks.  Place them the correct distance so they bump when you get to the top flat on the ramp.  Make sure the chocks won't slip and let you go too far.  Make those ramps with a slope off or down the "wrong side".  45 degrees or so....shirt ramp.  With a square cut off the ramp will tip up and you will impale the under carriage on the ramp.  Only makes the ramp 10 inches longer and not much heavier but pushing a ramp through a bay wall or battery box is well Huh??  OAK!  You must have connections and a strong back.  I would if I could, though if only for bragging rights....Wanna see my solid OAK ramps?  Gonna cost ya a beer.

Send some of the oil and coolant off to be analyzed so you will have data for Clifford and Don whether they want it or not.  I keep saying that cause I am not sure I have been heard...not any way I can be insisting on you doing a single thing though....truly.

John
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
BlueScarecrow
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« Reply #79 on: June 14, 2010, 01:57:07 PM »

Dear All,

Thanks for all your help.

I have progressed a lot since my last post.

I have since changed my oil to the Shell Rotella T1 50 wt. and the bus is running great.

I’d really like to replace all of the injectors and see if I can get the mileage to come up a little.

I've completely removed most of the unused wiring and I re-wired the front and side marker lights. Oddly the side markers had no wiring.

I’ve also buttoned up a few air leaks and I’m working on the gearbox pulley that runs the squirrel cages. The two pieces of metal that connect to the heim joint actually fractured. It happened while I was driving and the motor just quit while I was making a left from 19th Ave to e/b Bethany Home Road. I like the fact that MCI has a built-in kill device to stop the motor before any damage can occur.

Beyond all this, I’m gutting the entire inside. The bathroom is gone along with the dump tank; and the bathroom floor (the floor from hell) is also removed. It was actually riveted to the body which was under neath the plywood flooring.

I want to take up the entire floor including the chair rails and replace it with painted marine plywood.
Has anyone gone this far and is there an easy way to accomplish this?

Thanks!
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1983 MCI / TMC MC-9 Crusader II - DD 8V71  Located in Scottsdale, AZ  85252

Do you think that's air you're breathing? - "The Matrix"
RickB
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81 MCI 9 smooth side 8V71 Allison 754




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« Reply #80 on: June 14, 2010, 02:12:40 PM »

I have four words that you don't want to hear said together in a sentence when you're working on dismantling the interior of your bus.

"Work hardened stainless steel"

If you get stainless hot by drilling or cutting it too quickly it will get tempered and you better have some expensive carbide bits and blades if that happens. I learned that the hard way working on my door. So drill and cut slow and use oil if possible when dealing with stainless

Don't ask me how I learned that little tidbit Grin Grin Grin

Rick
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JohnEd
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« Reply #81 on: June 14, 2010, 03:07:25 PM »

Everything Rick said.   TWICE!  Use a grinding wheel where you can.  Buy good quality bits.

I have never been where you are.  I have sure seen a lot of others there.  That center section gets enough foul crap in it that it needs shop vacuumed and pressure sprayed when it is open and the bus is empty.  Sprinkle some Zink Sulfide/sulfate in there to kill of any future mildew/mold and some borax for other smells. 

But why would you want to replace the floor if it is solid?  Pull out that rubber flooring and you will destroy some of the sound proofing that the rubber contributes.  I should think that simply laying sheets of Polyisocy. in there at 1 inch min and then covering with 3/8s quality ply would be the hot ticket.  Less work, quieter, insulation.... wheres the down side? Not to discourage spray foam on the underside of the floor/ bay overhead.  Even if I had some soft spots I would try to replace sections and maybe do nothing if that spot was going to be under somthing that didn't need the support.

I have always thought I was missing something from my seat in the Peanut Gallery.  X thousands bus Knuts can't be wrong.

Got milk?

John
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
Jriddle
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« Reply #82 on: June 14, 2010, 04:00:29 PM »

Use a grinder with a cut off wheel to cut welds on the chair rail. Make sure you take stock in the company before you buy any cut off wheels because you will go through a lot of them. I drove a wedge in the rail to put pressure on the weld as I ground them. When I got close the rail would pop and I could move on to the next weld. I added a photo to explane why you should pull the floor.
« Last Edit: June 14, 2010, 04:02:29 PM by Jriddle » Logged

If It Can't Be Grown Then It Has To Be Mined
John Riddle
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1984 MC9
JohnEd
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« Reply #83 on: June 14, 2010, 05:13:34 PM »

Is there no way you can get to that center section without puling the entire floor?  All I have ever seen is pics.

There has never been a question that that unholy mess had to be removed.  Not in my mind, at any rate.

John
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"An uneducated vote is a treasonous act more damaging than any treachery of the battlefield.
The price of apathy towards public affairs is to be ruled by evil men." Plato
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”
—Pla
DaveG
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« Reply #84 on: June 14, 2010, 06:40:23 PM »

Mike (N9EWS) I'm still waiting for your theory on gravity.

Dave G (KI6OWH)
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Jeremy Watson
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« Reply #85 on: July 21, 2014, 07:28:26 PM »

Hello,
I recently purchased a 1971 MCI MC-7 with a rebuilt 8v71. I have been on the hunt for a great (and honest) mechanic in Phoenix to inspect and service it for me. While searching I came across this thread and noticed a couple members speaking highly of Michelangleo of Phoenix. I tried calling the number that was listed today and that number (602-340-001) is no longer associated with that business.

Can anyone recommend someone here in Phoenix?

Thank you!
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Jeremy Watson // American Chi
1971 MC-7 Challenger
Rebuilt 8v71 + Allison AT
twostick
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« Reply #86 on: July 21, 2014, 09:01:41 PM »

Hi Clifford... Thanks for writing.

I'm only theorizing, but it makes perfect sense.

Oil is seeping in through the blower seals (or from somewhere) into the blower and when the piston retracts and reveals the intake port the blower blows in fresh air along with some oil and it is combusted along with the fuel. This is the reason for the blue smoke. The reason that it does not run away, is probably that the amount is too small to support combustion.

When I gunned it the other day and it ran away for a few seconds, the amount probably reached the window of combustion and it took off! Since it was only a minute amount, the run-away lasted only a few seconds.

Then too, when the piston retracts and reveals the intake port, the blower blows in fresh air along with some oil in through the intake and right out the exhaust port. The oil lands on the superheated exhaust manifold... turns into white smoke... which travels out through the tailpipe. Remember it takes only a minute amount of oil to give a billowing white cloud.

When I did Special Effects in LA, we built a small cracker out of a 25 gallon drum. We filled the bottom with Johnson & Johnson Baby Oil just to cover the air manifold and we could make smoke all day without refilling the drum.

You are right about the zip. I use my brothers address as a base. He lives on 85th and Chaparral. I've been bouncing it around from location to location until I find a nice spot where it's not a bother to anyone and I have electricity to work on it. I have it parked at my apartment building right now. The owner is cool. Thought the Rolling Stones were in town.  Wink

What do you think of my theory?

Like to hear my theory on gravity?

Thanks again for writing!

If you like... send me an email and I'll send you my contact info.


Best regards,
Mike

N9EWS



I haven't read the entire thread but another reason a screamer will run away briefly is if it is dead idled for a prolonged period or driven at low speed, especially at low engine temps or if it has a few tired cylinders. What happens is the unburnt fuel that doesn't slobber out the exhaust collects in the air box and when enough of it collects, all it takes is for the engine to be revved up quick and it will inhale it, and away she goes.

I used to see it at trucking companies that would use an old beater with a 671 or 8v71 for a yard tractor and it would idle for days, never get out of second gear and the temp hovering about 130 deg.

The first guy that goosed it across the yard would get the ride of his life for a few seconds.

Kevin
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