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Author Topic: Should I eliminate one of my fuel tanks?? I appreciate input from this board.  (Read 2955 times)
Ace
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« Reply #15 on: July 30, 2006, 06:55:19 AM »

My MCI5C has a 144 gal. tank. I do not like to drive long distances non stop so I many times stop and put in 50 gal. Right now I am in Cornelius NC at camp Wally. last nite in SC I filled the tank to capacity at $1.77 a gal thats 22 cents cheaper than FL. I put in 80 gal thats a $16.16 cent saving. How many times will you do that over the life of the bus? Is it worth it?

Where is it at $1.77? This has GOT to be a mis-print! Probably $2.77...

Ace
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Ace
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« Reply #16 on: July 30, 2006, 07:01:15 AM »

Oh and Gary... You know me pretty well and you know I wouldn't tell you how to do it but if it were me? I wouldn't change a thing any different than the way it was originally built. That's kind of the reason why I added a seprate fuel tank for my Generator. I didn't want to intrerfere witht he factory tank and after doing so, I found out I could buy cheaper fuel for that tank! Go Figure... I did something right for a change! Smiley
 
Hope all is well and by the way, OT, Carla, Susan's Niece that was in a horrific car crash earlier in the year, is now beginning to speak words to people and familiarize herself with her surroundings. She is still in the Hospital but improving on a daily basis. Her husband on the other hand is a different story. What an @$# he has become telling relatives when they can visit and when they can't! Oh well, he under a lto f stress I presume!

Later...

Ace
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JackConrad
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« Reply #17 on: July 30, 2006, 07:43:42 AM »

Gary,
   I agrre with everyone else, you can't have too much fuel.  We have a separate (25 gallon) tank for our generator and the ability to pump fuel from our main tank to the generator tank if neccessary. We keep both tanks topped off during hurricane season. After Hurricane Charly, we lived in our bus for 3 weeks with no other power available and fuel was extremely difficult to get for the first week (1 staion open with cars lined up waiting for the next tanker load of fuel to arrive).  It is also nice to have the option of continuing down the road further to get a better price.  Jack
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« Reply #18 on: July 30, 2006, 08:25:52 AM »

And catastrophes can happen in any part of the country. We had a severe ice storm here a few years ago. First time in history that anyone can remember. However, the power was off for over a week. I certainly was glad DML was sitting in the driveway with a full fuel tank. We were the only house in the neighborhood, and maybe the town,  for several days with lights, heat and TV.

You never know where you are going to be in a few years. It may not be NC.

Richard


Gary,
   I agrre with everyone else, you can't have too much fuel.  We have a separate (25 gallon) tank for our generator and the ability to pump fuel from our main tank to the generator tank if neccessary. We keep both tanks topped off during hurricane season. After Hurricane Charly, we lived in our bus for 3 weeks with no other power available and fuel was extremely difficult to get for the first week (1 staion open with cars lined up waiting for the next tanker load of fuel to arrive).  It is also nice to have the option of continuing down the road further to get a better price.  Jack
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Gary LaBombard
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« Reply #19 on: July 30, 2006, 10:58:34 AM »

Well, It looks like the tally is in and the concensus is to keep both fuel tanks.  I did not expect such a response but those that did respond are of more experience as a bus nut than me and I respect you all as that.   I got 100 miles under by belt, what in the dickens do I know??  I will keep the tank after inspection and repairs if needed.

I will install a 13" tv if I need one outside for an entertainment center, so what on that too.  Thanks again for the input.  In an emergency such as in the past year all around the country could easily happen here also or where ever and I might just be happy I have the fuel to go one when others can't.  I have a feeling we all better be sure our fuel doors are lockable in the months ahead as the price of the fuel continues upward of coarse.

Thanks again for the input.
Gary   
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Gary
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« Reply #20 on: July 30, 2006, 12:20:57 PM »

Gary -  Another thought is to toss both of the 70 gallon tanks and install a single large tank that fits the space available.  Depending on it's size, you could easily end up with more capacity than OEM.

FWIW. . .
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RJ Long
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« Reply #21 on: July 30, 2006, 01:17:42 PM »

I have a MCI 7 with 144 gal tank.  I would not think of going smaller.  Years ago on my diesel pickup I put in a 50 gal tank in the bed with a fuel pump so I could pump fuel into my original tank.  That gives me over a 1000 mile range, no I can not drive that long without stopping, but when I had to drive from Arizona to California I could fill up in Arizona, saving a lot of money, and drive all the way in to LA and back without paying their high fuel prices.  The same tank is now in the 4th pickup.  And as has been said it gives you the option of shopping for lower fuel prices.
Ed
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Ed Van
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« Reply #22 on: July 30, 2006, 06:00:13 PM »

I have a 81 eagle with 185 gal tanks. two are the original eagle tanks, then I have two 20 gal saddle tankes in the rear bay. I like having that many gallons to play with. For me it works out great, have my choice where to refill.

     Pete
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WHAT EVER YOU DO, OR TO WHO YOU DO IT TOO, DO IT WITH A SMILE, IT MAKES IT LEGAL THAT WAY.
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« Reply #23 on: July 31, 2006, 03:12:38 PM »

Hello

I too, vote for lots of fuel.

Some days you don't get anywhere near 7 mpg, if you go messing around in an urban or winding slow country environment, fuel range and economy will drop.

And you can't use nearly all the fuel in the tank without risking sucking air....

I'd consider two tanks, one bigger main for the engine, and a healthy auxiliary. Auxiliary set up to usually run the genset/webasto/proheat/aquahot and is easily drained or transferred to the main tank, if the age of the fuel starts to be an issue, and to extend driving range.

If you are weight conscious, you don't need to run a full load except when you might need it.

For me, running hot-shot down to Jack's party in Florida from the frozen north (still a working stiff) Virginia fuel is cheapest, and the further I can go on it, the better!

happy coaching!
buswarrior
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