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Author Topic: Sideways on freezing rain!  (Read 3891 times)
fe2_o3
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« Reply #30 on: January 14, 2010, 09:01:31 PM »

One of the important things that has been overlooked is the need to always carry a change of clothes...Cable
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Sofar Sogood
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Everett, WA.
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« Reply #31 on: January 14, 2010, 09:38:50 PM »

One of the important things that has been overlooked is the need to always carry a change of clothes...Cable

no need for new ones just turn them inside out! Grin
Wink  BK  ; Shocked
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
PCC
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« Reply #32 on: January 15, 2010, 12:23:40 AM »

no need for new ones just turn them inside out! Grin
Wink  BK  ; Shocked


That is how I travel so light - half as much weight - and color coordinated too.

Bose makes a headphone for pilots (150 miles past the destination?) that selectively filters out ambient noises and allows other sounds through without change.

I know that this system works; some would like to be able to choose what is filtered.

Not inexpensive, but another thought.

We have digressed from the freezing rain subject, which reminds me of a device on a car I once owned, and on a few coaches also - a sensor that is made by VDO, and I imagine a few other gauge manufacturers, that attaches behind the front bumper and measures the temperature of the road, giving a dash mounted visual warning of freezing conditions under the vehicle. I have added one to each vehicle I drive to prevent the well controlled, free-style performance that initiated this thread.

My uncle, who drove for London Transport, told me that part of his training was to drive a double decker onto a section of wet pavement across which was diagonally strung a tight rope that caused the bus to go into a slide, and the trainees had to learn to handle the bus through the skid. I watched the video, and spinning one of those buses must be a wild ride. There are some pictures of the Chiswick facility at http://overground.doeth.net/chiswick/
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For some, patience is a virtue.
Dealing with me, it is required.
Thank God - He is always patient.
Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #33 on: January 15, 2010, 06:15:14 AM »

I have hit black ice 4-5 times before in a car and had no warning at all that conditions had changed. And as i said before it was all over in a matter of a couple of seconds with either no or very little time to react.  About the only way to have advance warning is to see a car ahead of you hit it. In my case there were no other cars at the time. 3 of the times occurred as i came around a corner. Solution?  avoid going around corners!!!! Grin   3 of the times i made it thru ok but was suprised/shaken up.  One other time i was spun around, crossed the other lane and ended up with the back of the car in the ditch and the front halfway out into the other lane. Did not know what had happened until i got out of the car and fell on my @$#. Road looked like it was barely damp but really had 1/2 inch of very clear ice on it.  Only about a 50-60 ft. long patch of it there, the rest of the road was fine.  Temp at the time was a little above freezing, sunny morning, but this corner was in a shady spot.  Now anytime it is cold out i am a little more aware and drive slower.  Wait a second!!!!! When it starts getting cold out i am on my way to Yuma!  If i see frost anywhere it means i am late in leaving. Grin
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1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
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« Reply #34 on: January 15, 2010, 06:29:00 AM »

Hey Keith that Setra yer looking at has that very same warning! (might help ya sell the idea easier! Wink)
Grin  BK  Grin
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Busted Knuckle aka Bryce Gaston
KY Lakeside Travel's Busted Knuckle Garage
Huntingdon, TN 12 minutes N of I-40 @ exit 108
www.kylakesidetravel.net

Grin Keep SMILING it makes people wonder what yer up to! Grin (at least thats what momma always told me! Grin)
lostagain
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« Reply #35 on: January 15, 2010, 06:36:55 AM »

Driving on snow and ice is one thing. There is some measure of traction, allowing some control, as long as you approach it slowly and with practiced skills. Years of experience has a lot to do with it. But freezing rain, water on top of ice, is the worst, and totally uncontrollable, without any traction at all. That's when you step out of the vehicle and wipe out immediately. If my rear wheels hadn't caught gravel a couple nights ago, I would've gone off the road. The biggest thing about driving a bus is SLOW, because once a skid gets going, the weight and momentum of the 10 to 20 ton mass makes it very difficult to control, unless you have a lot of space around you, which is rare. So everybody take  easy out there.

JC
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JC
Invermere, BC
1977 MC5C, 6V92/HT740
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