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Author Topic: Towing Prep. & Insurance?  (Read 4175 times)
Nellie Wilson
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« on: February 01, 2010, 07:59:05 AM »

I hate bringing up subjects we all (me, at least) mentally cringe from. It's  kinda like saying "shank"  on a golf course; nobody likes to hear it, nobody wants to see it (a bit like whoopsing one's cookies in public).

And I'm thinking the best preparation for towing is (probably) getting insurance with a company accustomed to towing our buses. So that's my first question: Can anyone recommend a decent (and reasonable) towing service?

But let's say the particular driver they dispatch (my sort of luck) knows nada about buses? What should I do - or instruct him - to do?

I've heard horror stories of unecessary (and expensive) damage from sloppy tow jobs (For those with a more bawdy sense of humour, that's spelled 'TEE-OH-DOUBLE YOU'  Smiley)

Questions that come quickly to mind: 1) To lift from front or back? 2) All wheels down? 3) Preventing the park brakes from engaging (if no air pressure)? 4) Pulling the drive axle (on a 4-speed standard shift)?

On that last, I've heard from reliable sources that it isn't necessary; OTOH, I've also heard that it's advisable on long distance tows.

I imagine this topic has been beat to death at some previous time, but I wasn't around then. And even if it was, I'd I'd feel more secure with updated information.

Thanks to all,

Nellie Wilson
« Last Edit: February 01, 2010, 08:01:24 AM by Nellie Wilson » Logged

Had to change a tire... Angry  got to put it on backward... Undecided  still trying to fix it on photoshop... Huh Roll Eyes Huh
bevans6
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« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2010, 08:02:51 AM »

Why do you want to tow your bus?  If roadside emergency towing is the issue, join Coachnet and let them worry about it.  they seem to have a really good reputation for doing things right.

Brian
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
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Ed Hackenbruch
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« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2010, 08:15:25 AM »

I also vote for CoachNet.  Tell them you want the bus transported on a Landoll. You may have to insist on it a bit. If they resist, ask if they will be liable for damages if towed any other way.
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1968 MCI 5A with 8V71 and Allison MT644 transmission.  Western USA
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« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2010, 08:32:36 AM »

The more I think about this, the more I am interested in some of the questions.

Front or rear would depend to some extent on what was broken.  In preference, I would pick up the front.  It's a lot lighter, and there is no really positive way to lock the steering. 

I wouldn't think that there is any need to drop the driveshaft or pull the axles on a coach with a 4 speed Spicer, unless the problem is the transmission itself.  There is nothing in there that will be harmed by it running in neutral that I can think of.

Now the big one that I don't feel sure about is how to get the emergency brake off with DD-3's if there is no air pressure.  Usually you could release them with air applied through the emergency fill in the front bay under the driver.  What if there was a failure in the air system?  Won't the DD-3 apply automatically under 45 psi?  There is no cage bolt to force them to disengage...

Good questions!

Brian 
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1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
Vintage race cars -
1978 Lola T440 Formula Ford
1972 NTM MK-4 B/SR
Nellie Wilson
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« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2010, 09:15:38 AM »

Brian -

It's not that I want to tow my bus. I just worry about the potential 'what ifs.'

RE: the DD3s: For some weird reason, mine don't always apply with lost air pressure. But usually they do, and that would sure make for some tough towing (all that screeching and smoke and such). Once they did apply on the highway (loss of air pressure)... they came on gradually, but locked up solid by the time I pulled over. An experience I'd rather not repeat.

Thanks for CoachNet recommendation: If two bus nuts actually agree (you and Ed) it's probably sound advice.  Smiley

Nellie 
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Had to change a tire... Angry  got to put it on backward... Undecided  still trying to fix it on photoshop... Huh Roll Eyes Huh
JackConrad
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« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2010, 10:14:38 AM »

There should be an air fitting in the compartment under the driver's seat to connect an air line from the wrecker to maintain air pressure in the coach while towing. Best towing position is on a landoll. Next best would be to have it towed by picking up the front wheels with the underslung arms on a large wrecker.  Jack
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« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2010, 02:59:02 PM »

Since I heard that Dallas makes house calls, I dropped my towing package LOL
Good luck with that and please, don't this serious, Will
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Paso One
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« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2010, 03:34:46 PM »

I also vote for Coach Net 

Paying the yearly fee as chased the need of using them away Smiley
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John316
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« Reply #8 on: February 01, 2010, 03:51:27 PM »

We also use Coachnet. Haven't needed a tow...yet Grin. landoll isn't an option for us (unless there is a carefully mapped route), because we are 13' tall right now (and I haven't seen a landoll that the deck is six inches off of the ground Grin Cheesy Grin). So it would have to be a truck tow onto the front wheels, like Jack said.

God bless,

John
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MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
belfert
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« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2010, 04:08:12 PM »

I have Coachnet and like them.  Unfortunately, I had to call them this past fall when I ran out of fuel.  I was partially blocking a road so Coachnet called a tow truck to at least get me out of the road.  Fortunately, I was able to get some fuel in the tank and the engine reprimed before the wrecker arrived.  I was able to call back and cancel the tow.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
John316
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« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2010, 04:13:42 PM »

Brian,

You bring up a good point. If we ever have an issue, in traffic, or in a dangerous location, the first thing that we do is to call a tow. Then we proceed to try to fix things ourselves. If we get rolling, cancel the tow. You can't get going, you have the tow.

FWIW

God bless,

John
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MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.
johns4104s
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« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2010, 04:19:20 PM »

 If height allows Landoll is the way to go. Lift the front means either pulling the axles or disconnection the drive shaft. Although I had problems with coachnet, I'm over it, I still use them. They are about the best out there.

But do not run without any road side assistance, I have used it maybe 5 times in the past 25 years.

John
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bcaddel
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« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2010, 07:36:51 PM »

I own a 1971 mc7 and I read in my coachnet literature (or maybe it was on their web site) that they will not insure vehicles over 40 years old. I still subscribe to their service this year but I think I will need to make a phone call to Coach Net next year when our bus hits that magic 40 years old.

Does anyone have any experience with coach net turning down a vehicle that is older than 40 years old?

I copied this from Coach Net Web Site.
=====================================

TERMS AND CONDITIONS
This guide is your contract with us, subject to the following:
1. The benefits and services offered by your membership are described in this guide. Please read this benefit guide to become familiar with the benefits and services. In the event there is any inconsistency between the languages of this guide and the information provided by an employee, representative, independent contractor or sales brochure the language in this guide shall govern. To ensure that our representatives are providing quality service, members are deemed to consent to monitoring of inbound and outbound calls.
2. All benefits are applicable to the member, spouse and his/her dependents (children under the age of 24) for one RV and all family vehicles, except if you received your coverage from your vehicle manufacturer, in which case your coverage is limited to one RV and one family automobile or truck. Any membership plan that is provided to the vehicle owner free of charge by a manufacturer is not intended to substitute for coverage that may or may not be available by the vehicle’s chassis manufacturer. Benefits are not applicable to commercial vehicles, or vehicles over 40 years old. As a courtesy tow dollies and boat trailers are covered for a tire change to a good mounted and inflated spare.
3. Whenever we refer to “you” and “your” throughout this Guide, we refer to the registered member and his/her spouse; whenever we refer to “we,” “us,” or Coach- Net, we refer to Coach-Net, an Arizona corporation.
4. The terms of this Benefit Guide, which are in conflict with the statutes of your state of residence, are amended to conform to the statutes of that state.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2010, 07:46:35 PM by bcaddel » Logged

Bob Caddel, Las Vegas Nevada
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« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2010, 07:58:31 PM »

Hi Nellie
On our way home from Arcadia we burned up our transmission outside of Marianna,Fl.  Coachnet towed us to Panama City, Fl. (about 90 miles)  Would have cost 900.00 if I had to pay it myself.
Richard Olson
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belfert
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« Reply #14 on: February 01, 2010, 08:29:12 PM »

I wonder how they choose 40 years as the age limit?  I'm surprised if they have a limit that it isn't something more like 20 years.

I know most busnuts are different, but we all know folks with vehicles 20 or 30 years old that don't do anything besides maybe change the oil.  Their ideea of maintenance is having their roadside assistance tow the vehicle when something breaks.
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Brian Elfert - 1995 Dina Viaggio 1000 Series 60/B500 - 75% done but usable - Minneapolis, MN
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