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Author Topic: Starting a cold engine.  (Read 5126 times)
Dreamscape
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« Reply #30 on: March 13, 2010, 11:05:34 AM »

Did you get your question answered John? Wink
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« Reply #31 on: March 13, 2010, 11:15:47 AM »

I feel a little better if there is oil always in the galleys (were ever they are) but I think as recommended on a cold engine I may turn the engine over a few time with the lever pushed allowing some pressure to build before start up.

Thanks to all.

John
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« Reply #32 on: March 13, 2010, 11:56:19 AM »

I just found a plug in the back lodged between the skin and the bumper. I thought it was a service light plug, turns out to be an engine warmer. Now I plug it in for 2 hours and the girl starts on the 1st turn vs the great white smoke out. M&C Grin
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« Reply #33 on: March 13, 2010, 07:12:16 PM »

On the electric consumption front..

another excellent job for your infrared thermometer.

Shoot the block and see just how little time you need to leave the block heater plugged in. It doesn't have to reach max temp capable, it just needs to be warm enough for a clean start.

No need to give the electric company any more of your beverage funds than absolutely necessary!

There are different watt ratings of block heaters, so everyone can't readily exchange times for given outside temperatures.

happy coaching!
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Sean
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« Reply #34 on: May 08, 2010, 10:04:34 AM »

This is "as of 2009" - I don't know of any later bulliten - FWIW
...

http://www.ddcsn.com/cps/rde/xbcr/ddcsn/DDC-SVC-BRO-0001.pdf



While doing research for a question in another thread, I discovered that DDC has modified the above-referenced publication and removed all two-stroke information from it.

It now refers you to the following publication, on the MTU site (Detroit sold the two-stroke business to MTU):

http://www.mtu-online.com/fileadmin/fm-dam/mtu-global/pdf/valuecare/A001061_33E.pdf

Not trying to re-start this thread -- just wanted to update the links, for anyone who comes along by doing an archive search (as I just did).

-Sean
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« Reply #35 on: May 10, 2010, 09:33:24 AM »

It's fortunate that I printed the previous version of DD's fuels/lubes specifications, because I cannot find any specific reference to our beloved old 2-strokes in this new MTU publication.   It is definitely Euro-centric, listing plenty of products not available outside the EU, plus some others from Asia and elsewhere.   Imagine going to your local friendly Detroit dealer and asking them for some Fascination of Power (on page 42)!   Seriously though, I do not see any reference to Delo 100 or Rotella T, or to any other 2-stroke oils still available in USA;  there is a fleeting mention of CF-2 at the bottom of page 5 that implies that such oils are Standard quality, not Higher quality (for what that's worth).

I guess we're now the unloved orphans of MTU, or maybe the oily-black sheep of MTU's flock.   Apart from giant marine powerplants, I cannot think of any 2-strokes still in common production (except for the US military's) around the rest of the world.   Foden FD6, Commer TS2 and Napier Deltic are even older than Detroits, so we're now the last of the last.

John
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« Reply #36 on: May 10, 2010, 10:39:53 AM »

John, I think there is some synchronization disconnect between the DDCSN site and the MTU site.  I think the DDC two-stroke information is already removed from the DDCSN publication, but not yet added to the MTU publication.

In any case, the 2005 version, which is relevant enough for most of us, is still available on the DDC site, here:

http://www.detroitdiesel.com/pdf/vocations/Lube-Oil-Fuel-Requirements.pdf

There were minor updates in 2009 relating to bio fuels and ULSD, but nothing significant in the lube oil section.

BTW, AFAIK, railway locomotive engines are also still two-stroke.

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
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« Reply #37 on: May 10, 2010, 12:21:40 PM »

BTW, AFAIK, railway locomotive engines are also still two-stroke.
Nobody likes 2-strokes any more, even railroads.   EMD's venerable 567, 645 and 710 engines have now been replaced by their H-series 4-stroke which powers the SD90 and others;  GE has always used 4-strokes in their locos, Alco is no more (except in India!), and Fairbanks-Morse also is history.   However there are still plenty of 2-stroke EMDs still to be found working hard, especially in the west and on secondary railroads, and in far-flung outposts of heavy haulage such as Mauretania and Australia where the longest trains in the world are run.

Yup, we're the end of the line (so to speak).
John
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« Reply #38 on: May 10, 2010, 12:51:42 PM »

Nobody likes 2-strokes any more, even railroads.   EMD's venerable 567, 645 and 710 engines have now been replaced by their H-series 4-stroke which powers the SD90 and others;


John, I believe the SD70 is EMD's only currently sold freight locomotive.  That's powered by the 16-710G3C-T2, which is an EPA Tier-2 two-stroke.

The SD90 is out of production, ironically because they do not have a Tier-2 version of the H series engine.  Also, AFAIK, UP is the only road in the US to ever buy any, and they are phasing them out.

-Sean
http://OurOdyssey.BlogSpot.com
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« Reply #39 on: May 10, 2010, 02:46:34 PM »

John-I beg to differ on the 2 stroke EMD's.  In Los Angeles, Metro Link just took delivery of new EMD locomotives that are powered by 16V-710's with a second smaller Diesel for electrical service in the passenger cars.  I was in Albuquerque, NM last year for the Camping World RV get together, and they too had new EMD's with 16V-710's running their version of light rail service.
Fairbanks-Morse opposed piston engines up to inline 12 cylinder are still being made-mostly in dual fuel natural gas operation for both generation and pumping.
The world's largest Diesel engines are 2 stroke engines running in overseas container ships (38" bore by 98" stroke)-and they are the most fuel efficient engines made in the world.
Don Fairchild can bring most turbo'd 2 stroke Detroits up to Tier 2 level with his kits.  Good Luck, TomC
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Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.
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